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Hypoglycemia - how do you feel?
#1
For those of you who have diabetes and use insulin, how do you feel when you have a 'low' (hypoglycemia) episode? I mean, how do you really feel? Lately it seems that when I have a low, I feel wiped out afterwards. I am working with my Endo to limit those episodes, but I don't think anyone can totally eliminate them or maybe I'm wrong?
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#2
I'm not diabetic, but I have mild hypoglycemia. My doctor said I didn't; the dietician said she has seen people with numbers "on the border" who do have it. I nearly fainted during the sugar test - had to ask for a bed to lay on - and I have symptoms, so I say I do have it.

My episodes show up as brain going foggy/ I'm not making smart decisions (such as, to eat now, rather than finishing mowing the lawn). And I get an overwhelming urge to lay down and nap; so I frequently DO.

However, other than taking quite a while to recover from that nap (perhaps that's the sensation you are having) I don't have any real after effects. I haven't let myself get that way for several years now, so I may be forgetting a bit ....

(ie I'm not sure I've helped, but "BUMP" in case others can.)
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#3
Both my brother and late Dad would get shakey legs when they stood. That was usually the first symptom. I am recent to insulin and have not yet had a low.

Is it preventable? Well, there are steps to prevent it, but I honestly don't know enough about it yet to give any advise. In my BIL's case, glipizide was causing his lows. Now they want him to maintain an A1C between 7 and 8 instead of 6 to 7. He has not had a low episode since, but he is 75 - they are less worried about damage from diabetes than having him pass out when he's home alone.
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#4
(08-04-2016, 04:20 PM)BadGoodDeb Wrote: I'm not diabetic, but I have mild hypoglycemia. My doctor said I didn't; the dietician said she has seen people with numbers "on the border" who do have it. I nearly fainted during the sugar test - had to ask for a bed to lay on - and I have symptoms, so I say I do have it.

My episodes show up as brain going foggy/ I'm not making smart decisions (such as, to eat now, rather than finishing mowing the lawn). And I get an overwhelming urge to lay down and nap; so I frequently DO.

However, other than taking quite a while to recover from that nap (perhaps that's the sensation you are having) I don't have any real after effects. I haven't let myself get that way for several years now, so I may be forgetting a bit ....

(ie I'm not sure I've helped, but "BUMP" in case others can.)

My episodes also show up as brain going foggy and/or not making smart decisions such as continuing with the task at hand instead of taking time to treat the low, now, instead of later. I rarely take a nap but perhaps I would be better off if I did nap after a low as I feel so very tired for quite a while.


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#5
(08-04-2016, 08:18 PM)Mosquitobait Wrote: Both my brother and late Dad would get shakey legs when they stood. That was usually the first symptom. I am recent to insulin and have not yet had a low.

Is it preventable? Well, there are steps to prevent it, but I honestly don't know enough about it yet to give any advise. In my BIL's case, glipizide was causing his lows. Now they want him to maintain an A1C between 7 and 8 instead of 6 to 7. He has not had a low episode since, but he is 75 - they are less worried about damage from diabetes than having him pass out when he's home alone.

I understand about your BIL trying to maintain an A1C in the 7-8 range instead of 6-7 range. The Endo tells me that when one gets older we tend to take longer to recover from a low, so whenever possible try to avoid the low to begin with. It isn't like anyone intentionally decides "Oh well, today I will take too much insulin so I have a low." Sometimes it just happens.

For example, this morning I had 2 scrambled eggs with a sausage pattie and a slice of wheat toast. I took insulin for the toast and 2 hrs later my blood sugar dropped to 57. The only reason I can think of that may have caused this is that the weather where we live is very hot, as is the weather over much of the US. Hot weather will often cause a low because of increased insulin sensitivity.

Thank you for sharing your thoughts.

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#6
I can't eat cold cereal with skim milk for breakfast - even Cheerios, which isn't overtly sugared. I wind up compelled to nap 1-2 hours later -- when I've just gotten up! So I eat large protein breakfasts.

I can sometimes eat cereal for *supper* .... so it must be the long fast before breakfast that gets me.
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#7
(08-05-2016, 12:09 PM)BadGoodDeb Wrote: I can't eat cold cereal with skim milk for breakfast - even Cheerios, which isn't overtly sugared. I wind up compelled to nap 1-2 hours later -- when I've just gotten up! So I eat large protein breakfasts.

I can sometimes eat cereal for *supper* .... so it must be the long fast before breakfast that gets me.

For me it isn't so much the sugar in cereal but the carb content that spikes me into the stratosphere as far as blood glucose rise. I used to love cereal and milk, but I don't eat it much anymore because of what it does to my blood sugar.

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#8
(08-04-2016, 08:52 PM)GrammaBear Wrote: For example, this morning I had 2 scrambled eggs with a sausage pattie and a slice of wheat toast. I took insulin for the toast and 2 hrs later my blood sugar dropped to 57. The only reason I can think of that may have caused this is that the weather where we live is very hot, as is the weather over much of the US. Hot weather will often cause a low because of increased insulin sensitivity.

Thank you for sharing your thoughts.

I saw an endo for the first time today and he specifically mentioned staying hydrated as even mild dehydration can cause a low unexpectedly. I thought I should mention that because, well, I didn't know, maybe you don't either!?
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#9
No, I didn't know that! However, I am trying to really drink 64 ounces each day, by filling two 32 oz bottles and getting them emptied. That's at my heart doc's suggestion.

Also, per the previous post, I didn't realize it was just *carbs* , not particularly sugar. I'll watch that. Although, oatmeal doesn't usually bother me too much, even with brown sugar on it. Is that a less glycemic carb, perhaps?
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#10
I didn't know about dehydration causing a unexpected low either. It is always good to learn new things.

Oatmeal, for me at least, is a slower digesting carb but it still sends my blood sugar spiking. However if I take my meal time insulin 20-30 minutes ahead of eating the oatmeal, I can 'sometimes' sneak a bowl of oatmeal past the blood sugar monster in me anyways. Thinking-about
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