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I have the cpap model...not the elite
#31
49er, WADR to your opinion, you are complicating matters. She has had fitful sleep for about 4 hours a night, if that much, reported before and after CPAP. She is at a relatively low pressure. She is new to all this and has not adapted to it yet. Let's focus on the forest and not the trees. Its not necessary to further complicate the matter where the solution appears obvious- cure the sleep deprivation. I mean, no wonder OP feels like cr*p, and her reported cognitive deficit may be related to not using the machine enough.
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#32
dittos on comments above -- it is much better to have greater data capability, not only for you, but for the sleep doc. as zonk says, [if you have a problem, you'll have the data to use to analyze it] and I'll add that the doc [if you have one that will analyze the data] will obtain the benefit as well.

let's assume for a moment that you do not get the responsible response you hope for from the doctor.
- in that case you can learn to use the one you have to the greatest extent (you will likely get, as noted above, significantly better sleep with the machine you now have than without a machine.)
- or buy a second-hand data capable one from reputable suppliers (some identified on this forum).

On the learning how to use this one, two basic suggestions (besides getting the setup manual):

1. keep diary of how you feel.
2. lying on side is usually better than lying on the back. [lying on left side usually better than right - more often stated in the community].

Do not worry about only getting a few hours sleep at a time. a lot of us do two-sleep (or more) getting up and reading/doing light conversation/crossword puzzles for up to 2 hours before doing another 3 to 4 hour sleep. I average 6.25 hours sleep for normal 8 hour night (after 8 months).

Good luck,

QAL

Dedicated to QALity sleep.
You'll note I am listed as an Advisory Member. I am honored to be listed as such. See the fine print - Advisory Members as a group provide advice and suggestions to Apnea Board administrators and staff concerning Apnea Board operation and administrative policies. Membership in the Advisory Member group should not be understood as in any way implying medical expertise or qualification for advising Sleep Apnea patients concerning their treatment.
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#33
Data this, data that...people are suggesting complicating the matter for a person who is clearly, IMO, overwhelmed by the process.

In this case, and at this time, KISS principle is the better path.
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#34
(07-11-2015, 03:31 PM)tedburnsIII Wrote: 49er, WADR to your opinion, you are complicating matters. She has had fitful sleep for about 4 hours a night, if that much, reported before and after CPAP. She is at a relatively low pressure. She is new to all this and has not adapted to it yet. Let's focus on the forest and not the trees. Its not necessary to further complicate the matter where the solution appears obvious- cure the sleep deprivation. I mean, no wonder OP feels like cr*p, and her reported cognitive deficit may be related to not using the machine enough.

Ted,

Without a fully data capable machine, a person is flying blind with therapy just like if someone who had high blood pressure or diabetes didn't have a bp monitor/glucometer that was fully functioning. Since Dawn still has time to exchange the machine, now is the time to do it before it is too late. And even if it turns out that nothing is complicating Dawn's sleep other than simply getting used to the machine, there might come a time where she runs into a problem where having a fully data capable machine will be crucial.
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#35
(07-11-2015, 02:32 PM)mzdawn74 Wrote:
(07-11-2015, 06:09 AM)OpalRose Wrote: mzdawn74,
This nonsense is typical of what DME's do to their customers. Annoyed-and-disappointed This same thing happened to me too.

You have a right to get the machine you want. Ask your doctor to write a script for an Auto CPAP, and it should state patient choice. Also ask him to prescribe a pressure range so there is no mistake with the DME. Tell your DME that you want a "new" machine", with no previous machine hours on it. They typically try to pawn off a used machine that someone else returned.

Do this ASAP, and tell the doctor you will be in to pick up the script. Don't take no for an answer.

As others have said, you will be stuck with this machine for 5 years, and you have no idea what your future needs will be.

Thank you for the advice. I know my doctor is going to try and debate with me just as the DME rep did. What do I say as to why I want to change machines other than it offers me the ability to track my therapy better? I need help explaining myself. I'm sorry if I sound dumb, but like I said earlier I am really not very knowledgeable in this area. I've tried reading and learning what I can, but with my brain not functioning properly its very difficult to say the least. Dont-know


Ok, tell your doctor that you want to be proactive in your treatment, and that the machine they gave you will not let you do that since you cannot see the data.

He is going to say you are fine because of the low AHI! Tell him that you feel a fully data capable Auto CPAP will allow you not only to tract your data, but meet any future needs you may have if a pressure change is needed. It shouldn't matter to him or her what machine you get. You know your doctor better than anyone else, so be firm, but make him or her feel that you will be able to meet compliance easier if you can tract your own data, and you can print out reports for him or her to look over.

The DME can do nothing but follow doctor's script.

OpalRose
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#36
You will find no argument from me that having more data available is beneficial (more to those here than the usual CPAP patient-look at our small numbers), but focus of the thread seems to distract from her issue.

If she can get a different machine without consequential loss, APAP with full data, then do so. But I was under the impression her machine was data-capable, maybe not so much as others, though. The fact her AHI numbers were stellar led me to believe that the issue is her adaptability to the whole process, not that APAP is the solution to her woes.

It appears that OP is overwhelmed and close to dropping out. In this precarious situation, it might be better not to complicate things with all this learning curve jargon and change of machine if she does not address the problem now, not with another machine, but dealing with her present one.

The best advice I can give OP presently is to see her doctor about placing her on prescription 'Z' drug, e.g, Ambien, to help her get over the hump. Not using her machine for nearly a week is not at all conducive to her success.
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#37
The AHI appears to be great, although it might not be a complete picture, she is clinically well treated. I think in discussing this with the doctor, I would not go over the AHI numbers. Honestly, they are among the best I've seen other than the hours of use. The quality of sleep is a more important matter. APAP is not a miracle. You will need to adjust regardless of what machine you have.

The main advantage of an Elite or Autoset is that you can be a participant in your treatment rather than just a patient. That can make the difference between success and failure in some people. CPAP is vitally important, and the more that can be done to encourage patient success, at minimal additional cost, the better. If it's important to you, it should be important to your doctor. We're not talking about a luxury here; just someone that wants to succeed and have a voice in their care.
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#38
(07-11-2015, 04:04 PM)49er Wrote:
(07-11-2015, 03:31 PM)tedburnsIII Wrote: 49er, WADR to your opinion, you are complicating matters. She has had fitful sleep for about 4 hours a night, if that much, reported before and after CPAP. She is at a relatively low pressure. She is new to all this and has not adapted to it yet. Let's focus on the forest and not the trees. Its not necessary to further complicate the matter where the solution appears obvious- cure the sleep deprivation. I mean, no wonder OP feels like cr*p, and her reported cognitive deficit may be related to not using the machine enough.

Ted,

Without a fully data capable machine, a person is flying blind with therapy just like if someone who had high blood pressure or diabetes didn't have a bp monitor/glucometer that was fully functioning. Since Dawn still has time to exchange the machine, now is the time to do it before it is too late. And even if it turns out that nothing is complicating Dawn's sleep other than simply getting used to the machine, there might come a time where she runs into a problem where having a fully data capable machine will be crucial.

I don't believe that to be true. She has AHI reporting, and certainly more data is better, but not 'flying blind' without fully data capable, SH, etc. That is for the afficionados and perfectionists who have the time and more likely to optimize their therapy. The general population benefits from the therapy, but perhaps not as much as some of us here.

I attribute much of my success thus far to being here and also to monitoring my data, which keeps me in the loop as to my progress or decline. But not everyone, especially those who are working full-time, have the desire, inclination, time or motivation to be so intimately involved with their therapy.

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#39
(07-11-2015, 04:04 PM)49er Wrote: Since Dawn still has time to exchange the machine, now is the time to do it before it is too late.
+1 ... strike while the iron is hot

General comments raised in this thread, not a direct response to the OP
The fact of the matter insurance is not some charity organization, handing out CPAP to the needy
Rather they're in the business of making money $$$
A little bird told me ... insurance pay the same amount $$$ for the brick or the AutoSet

Good DME, dispense fully data capable machines, while lousy counterpart make few dollars more by dispensing bricks
So, given a choice ... why anyone choose the brick over the AutoSet. After all, its their own money buying the machine

The fact remain, there is no diagnoses of sleep apnea or anything else without data
Data definition: facts and statistics collected together for reference or analysis

xPAP does not treat anything else beside sleep apnea, might have some healing effects on general health and well being
Oxygen starvation and sleep deprivation is deadly combo

Oh, CPAP makers ... discontinue the bricks, cost few cents more to turn brick into top-notch machine
Shame on you



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#40
Some people prefer all the bells and whistles, others don't really give a hoot. I would've obtained an arguably 'better' machine myself that were compatible with SH, if I had to do it all over again. Otherwise, my machine I believe to be on a nearly equal level with those that are twice as costly.

That's just me. I was ignorant and blindly accepted the machine DME provided, but my APAP machine is data-capable, and the software is quite adequate. My only regret is that it's not compatible with SH, but that is not a fatal flaw as far as I am concerned. My dissatisfaction there is not enough to sufficiently matter- to me! And my machine has not caused one problem, thus far. YMMV.

Nevertheless, a brick will do its job if you do, though I agree it would overall be better to do away with them.

Not that it really matters to those here, my machine is NOT a brick, although it may 'look' like one.
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