Hello Guest, Welcome to Apnea Board !
As a guest, you are limited to certain areas of the board and there are some features you can't use.
To post a message, you must create a free account using a valid email address.

or Create an Account


New Posts   Today's Posts

If you have Apnoea it might be time to see a Lawyer!
#11
(09-06-2012, 03:35 PM)Podd Wrote: I cannot see how the jaw can be forced forward under Cpap pressure, biologically I don't think this is possible?

I don't believe that the CPAP pressure would cause a problem - but I am fully prepared to believe that a badly fitted or over-tight mask or chin strap could.

Just sayin'...
Post Reply Post Reply



Donate to Apnea Board  
#12
'British?'Dielaughing, It appears to be a 'Canadian' based study with a sample set of forty six 'Japanese' subjects, it is inconclusive as even the authors freely admit but IMHO this type of study is important as they form the 'Backbone' of further research.
Anyway, here is a summary of the facts or lack of facts, food for thought?, well thats up to you?

Craniofacial changes after 2 years of nasal continuous positive airway pressure use in patients with obstructive sleep apnea.
Tsuda H, Almeida FR, Tsuda T, Moritsuchi Y, Lowe AA.
Source
Department of Oral Health Sciences, The University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada. htsuda@dent.kyushu-u.ac.jp
Abstract
BACKGROUND:
Many patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) use nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP) as a first-line therapy. Previous studies have reported midfacial hypoplasia in children using nCPAP. The aim of this study is to assess the craniofacial changes in adult subjects with OSA after nCPAP use.
METHOD:
Forty-six Japanese subjects who used nCPAP for a minimum of 2 years had both a baseline and a follow-up cephalometric radiograph taken. These two radiographs were analyzed, and changes in craniofacial structures were assessed. The cephalometric measurements evaluated were related to face height, interarch relationship, and tooth position.
RESULTS:
Most of the patients with OSA were men (89.1%), and the mean baseline values for age, BMI, and apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) were 56.3 ± 13.4 years, 26.8 ± 5.6 kg/m(2), and 42.0 ± 18.6/h. The average duration of nCPAP use was 35.0 ± 6.7 months. After nCPAP use, cephalometric variables demonstrated a significant retrusion of the anterior maxilla, a decrease in maxillary-mandibular discrepancy, a setback of the supramentale and chin positions, a retroclination of maxillary incisors, and a decrease of convexity. However, significant correlations between the craniofacial changes, demographic variables, or the duration of nCPAP use could not be identified. None of the patients self-reported any permanent change of occlusion or facial profile.
CONCLUSION:
The use of an nCPAP machine for > 2 years MAY change craniofacial form by reducing maxillary and mandibular prominence and/or by altering the relationship between the dental arches.
Thinking-about

There are some unwelcome 'side' effects to Cpap as I am sure you are well aware of, we tend to accept these as 'Par for the Course' as the benefits outweigh these, if this is true and Cpap can 'Alter' our appearance or cause Pain then perhaps this 'Balance' needs revising.Thinking-about

Post Reply Post Reply


Possibly Related Threads...
Thread Author Replies Views Last Post
  AHI 2.54 but time over leak redline is 28% vsk2010 10 225 02-20-2018, 10:55 AM
Last Post: vsk2010
  [CPAP] AHI increased after doctor increases pressure 2nd time ppk8 14 386 02-20-2018, 07:39 AM
Last Post: Walla Walla
  issue with airsense 10 bogus usage time mrwhitee 4 304 02-19-2018, 01:29 PM
Last Post: mrwhitee
  Time Setting/Hours Wrong on Replacement Bipap bluemom51 5 154 02-15-2018, 02:03 PM
Last Post: HalfAsleep
  Time for new machine PaulaO2 6 229 02-15-2018, 10:30 AM
Last Post: Sleep2Snore
  Session break same time every night WiredUp 9 408 02-04-2018, 05:03 AM
Last Post: Ockrocket
  Back for a Second Round...this time I'm going to get it ATLApnea 6 253 01-28-2018, 10:51 PM
Last Post: ATLApnea

Forum Jump:

New Posts   Today's Posts




About Apnea Board

Apnea Board is an educational web site designed to empower Sleep Apnea patients.