Hello Guest, Welcome to Apnea Board !
As a guest, you are limited to certain areas of the board and there are some features you can't use.
To post a message, you must create a free account using a valid email address.

or Create an Account


New Posts   Today's Posts

Interpreting O2 Data?
#1
Interpreting O2 Data?
I'm not sure if this is a good place to post this or not so let me know if I should go somewhere else.  I was diagnosed with mild to moderate apnea.  I'm kind of claustrophobic and was not comfortable with the CPAP test so am using a dental appliance.  I use an O2 monitor and the data is pretty variable. 
- Does anyone know how a score is calculated?  It is not directly drops per hour.
- Sometimes there are drops to down near 70%.  How bad is that?  Big drops or maybe average O2 seem to have more of an affect on the way I feel than the score. 
- Sometimes the O2 level even starts out in the low 90s which seems really odd.  Is it?
- Are there any references available with examples of "how bad is bad" or something similar? 

I have others wear the monitor and it sits right around 98%.  I'm trying to attach an example but notice that new members can not.


Attached Files Thumbnail(s)
   
Post Reply Post Reply






Donate to Apnea Board  
#2
RE: Interpreting O2 Data?
1 - I've never understood how an O2 score is calculated - sorry
2 - Anything below 88% is a cause for concern. 70% is definitely bad, but yours may be a momentary artifact, not a true drop
3 - The low 90s% is definitely odd. Most people are 95% to 98%. Mine used to be 94% to 97%. and the I got a quadruple bypass operation, and it went up to 98% most of the time.
Check with your doctor and insurance about the feasibility of a Radial artery angiogram... I'd like to say it won't hurt, but it will. But less than a heart attack. Also less than the quad...
Apnea Board Monitors are members who help oversee the smooth functioning of the Board. They are also members of the Advisory Committee which helps shape Apnea Board's rules & policies. Membership in the Advisory Members group does not imply medical expertise or qualification for advising Sleep Apnea patients concerning their treatment.
Post Reply Post Reply
#3
RE: Interpreting O2 Data?
Usually spikes like that is the problem with the probe losing good contact. However, under 88 for a while needs to be looked into.
Apnea (80-100%) 10 seconds, Hypopnea (50-80%) 10 seconds, Flow Limits (0-50%) not timed  Cervical Collar - Dealing w DME - Chart Organizing
Post Reply Post Reply
#4
RE: Interpreting O2 Data?
(07-12-2021, 06:31 PM)mcman56 Wrote: I'm not sure if this is a good place to post this or not so let me know if I should go somewhere else.  I was diagnosed with mild to moderate apnea.  I'm kind of claustrophobic and was not comfortable with the CPAP test so am using a dental appliance.  I use an O2 monitor and the data is pretty variable. 
- Does anyone know how a score is calculated?  It is not directly drops per hour.
- Sometimes there are drops to down near 70%.  How bad is that?  Big drops or maybe average O2 seem to have more of an affect on the way I feel than the score. 
- Sometimes the O2 level even starts out in the low 90s which seems really odd.  Is it?
- Are there any references available with examples of "how bad is bad" or something similar? 

I have others wear the monitor and it sits right around 98%.  I'm trying to attach an example but notice that new members can not.

First   Welcome

Oxygen Saturation or SpO2 stands for Saturation of peripheral Oxygen.  It is how well saturation of oxygen is at usually the distal end of the finger.  Its a good indication of how well the entire body is saturated with Oxygen.

99 - 95% is considered good or average (normal)
89% or lower is consider not good.  Mean something is hampering the delivery of oxygen to the body.

70% is as you can imagine not good.  If you want to think of it as a glass full or empty.  The glass is 30% empty.

While you are awake your SpO2 is 98% thats good.  Its an indication normally your body isn't hampered for processing oxygen.  It seems the Dental Appliance might not be enough for you.  CPAP is the standard for therapy for Sleep Apnea.  You most likely will need to discuss treatment options with you MD.  Dental appliances dont work for a-lot of people. https://www.health.harvard.edu/blog/dent...1042822476

Tell us more about the CPAP test.  Did they use a full face mask?  They make small nasal pillow masks that go under the nose only.  Usually those work great and aren't claustrophobic at all for most.  You dont mention your AHI so not sure how really bad it is.

Hope that helps.
Thank you,
Brent aka Factor

Just a Regular guy.
My untreated AHI was 87.  You can do it hang in there.
"You can if you will"   Jerry Kramer

Got OSCAR?
Organize Charts
Optimizing Therapy

My Story
Post Reply Post Reply






Donate to Apnea Board  
#5
RE: Interpreting O2 Data?
I tried the the full mask because I tend to be a mouth breather.  Do the nose ones work for mouth breathers?  I may repeat.

The test results are quite odd.  As I look at the pre device vs post device results, the results looks 2x as bad to me with the device.  My doctor thought that was OK because I spent more time on my back during the post device test.  When I challenged him, he said the if the device is not working I could stop using it.  That seems like a really poor response.  So, I'm wondering how bad is bad and if I should pursue CPAP or accept this as good enough.   

 Test 1
Summary of study data::  
· All night pRDI= 16.5/h and pAHI= 13.3/h.  
· Supine pRDI= 20.5/h and pAHI= 17.6/h.  
· SpO2 data: Mean = 95%, minimal 85 % and < 90% is 0.2% of TST.  
_________________________________________________________________________________________  
Post dental device
All night pRDI= 29.2/h and pAHI= 27.6/h.  
○ Supine pRDI= 38.8/h and pAHI= 37.7/h.  
· SpO2 data: Mean = 93%, minimal 80% and < 90% is 3.0% of TST.  
Findings:  
Valid with acceptable Data.  
This study is consistent with moderate obstructive sleep apnea  
The patient's sp02 was less than 90% for 2% or greater duration of the PSG.  
Post Reply Post Reply
#6
RE: Interpreting O2 Data?
I read it the same way you do. That is with the caveat that I've not looked at either full test.

Is this the doc that set you up with the MAD?

IMHO, based on these two summaries,
1. I would quit the MAD
2. I would get a ResMed AirSense 10 AutoSet (keyword is AutoSet) and begin APAP treatment, initial settings

Mode: Auto
Pressure 7-15
EPR = 2, Fulltime
These will need to be modified after either your 1st or 2nd night.

Masks, Nasal Masks can work for Mouth Breathers, but you would have to try to know for sure. Read the Mask Primer (in my signature). Masks MUST be tried on.
Post Reply Post Reply
#7
RE: Interpreting O2 Data?
It Simply put you are worse off with the dental device.  Higher AHI numbers are worse not better.

http://www.apneaboard.com/wiki/index.php...ndex_(AHI)
AHI
Rating
<5
Normal (no Sleep Apnea)


5-15
Mild Sleep Apnea


15-30
Moderate Sleep Apnea


>30
Severe Sleep Apnea


Before the dental device 
 pAHI= 13.3/h.   Mild Sleep apnea

After the device 
pAHI= 27.6/h.  2.4 points for Severe OSA


Quote:My doctor thought that was OK because I spent more time on my back during the post device test. 

Add you never sleep on your back?  

Your on the back (Supine) pAHI= 37.7/h is way over severe.



Quote:When I challenged him, he said the if the device is not working I could stop using it.  

He should know if your AHI is anything above 5 its not working.  Your TREATED AHI should be 5 or less.  


Quote:That seems like a really poor response.
 I agree.  Are they a Sleep Doctor?  a GP, or an ENT? 


Quote:So, I'm wondering how bad is bad and if I should pursue CPAP or accept this as good enough.
It is the gold standard of treatment.  If you want to get better you need CPAP.  No dont accept it.  You are not Treated until your AHI is 5 or below.


Quote:I tried the the full mask because I tend to be a mouth breather.  Do the nose ones work for mouth breathers?
You are a mouth breather most likely because you have had OSA for years.  So the body uses the Mouth to get in all the Oxygen it can.  Most people can revert to Nose breathing with in a few months.  There are a few types of FM.

I cant post commercial links. google these

Dreamwear Nasal CPAP Mask - Philips


Airfit N30i - ResMed Nasal Mask StarterPack

DreamWear Full Face Mask - Philips

ResMed AirFit F30i Full Face CPAP Mask

You dont have to be retested.  You have Sleep Apnea just tell the Doctor/Sleep doctor to write you a prescription for cpap.

Here is the machine.
ResMed AirSense 10 AutoSet CPAP with HumidAir
Hope that helps.
I am sure other will comment to.
Thank you,
Brent aka Factor

Just a Regular guy.
My untreated AHI was 87.  You can do it hang in there.
"You can if you will"   Jerry Kramer

Got OSCAR?
Organize Charts
Optimizing Therapy

My Story
Post Reply Post Reply






Donate to Apnea Board  
#8
RE: Interpreting O2 Data?
(07-13-2021, 06:36 PM)Gideon Wrote: I read it the same way you do.  That is with the caveat that I've not looked at either full test.

Is this the doc that set you up with the MAD?

IMHO, based on these two summaries,
1. I would quit the MAD
2. I would get a ResMed AirSense 10 AutoSet (keyword is AutoSet) and begin APAP treatment, initial settings

Mode: Auto
Pressure 7-15
EPR = 2,   Fulltime
These will need to be modified after either your 1st or 2nd night.

Masks,  Nasal Masks can work for Mouth Breathers, but you would have to try to know for sure.  Read the Mask Primer (in my signature).  Masks MUST be tried on.

Right on what Gideon said as well..

We stand ready to help you make it mcman56.

read My Story in my signature..
Thank you,
Brent aka Factor

Just a Regular guy.
My untreated AHI was 87.  You can do it hang in there.
"You can if you will"   Jerry Kramer

Got OSCAR?
Organize Charts
Optimizing Therapy

My Story
Post Reply Post Reply
#9
RE: Interpreting O2 Data?
Thanks for this input.  I'll go see my doc today.

Believe it or not, I was all done by a sleep doc.  The same one.  When challenged he just said I could stop wearing the dental device if it was not helping.  I was quite shocked at his response.
Post Reply Post Reply
#10
RE: Interpreting O2 Data?
FWIW while I was awaiting my OSA diagnosis I used an O2Ring with O2 Insight and found my SpO2 was dropping every 50 seconds, often down to 70% (the minimum the sensor will report). Literally the day I started using CPAP that improved drastically. Now my SpO2 almost never drops below 90%. If I look in detail the few apnea events I'm having correlate very closely to SpO2 drops, only now the APAP catches them early and ramps up the pressure enough to get me breathing again before my SpO2 can drop too much.

So for me at least I've come to trust my SpO2 data as a good measurement of my OSA, as confirmed by its correlation to both my sleep study and what the APAP device is telling me. Also wanted to post this as encouragement to maybe try the CPAP again. I'm sure this board has lots of advice on how to overcome feeling claustrophobic.
Post Reply Post Reply






Donate to Apnea Board  


Possibly Related Threads...
Thread Author Replies Views Last Post
  help interpreting data Canemedic 5 173 07-22-2021, 03:31 PM
Last Post: Canemedic
  Need help interpreting OSCAR data zombied 3 158 07-05-2021, 07:36 PM
Last Post: Geer1
  [Treatment] struggling, help interpreting OSCAR data and possible adjustments? manganCPAP 21 469 06-27-2021, 12:53 PM
Last Post: Geer1
  NEED HELP INTERPRETING OSCAR DATA JoeyC 50 816 06-20-2021, 10:33 AM
Last Post: JoeyC
  [Diagnosis] Interpreting breath patterns mrtea 11 345 06-04-2021, 03:14 AM
Last Post: Gideon
  Interpreting Daily Oscar Reports lbl82 7 189 06-01-2021, 03:50 PM
Last Post: jaswilliams
  [CPAP] First time with APAP, requesting help with interpreting the results deep303 5 244 05-28-2021, 12:40 AM
Last Post: Melman


New Posts   Today's Posts






About Apnea Board

Apnea Board is an educational web site designed to empower Sleep Apnea patients.