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Is my mechanic trying to take me to the cleaners?
#11
(08-04-2013, 12:00 PM)SuperSleeper Wrote:
(08-04-2013, 06:23 AM)Don in Austin Wrote: Be aware that after a sensor is replaced some simple programming is required or it will not register with the system and you will have a flashing TPMS light.
Don in Austin -- Auto repair shop owner

Don, can that re-set be done via a standard OBD II code reader that can clear the codes?

Or is it more complicated that that?

Thanks. Coffee

A generic OBDII code reader won't do it. The transmitter will have an ID code printed on it which will need to be registered not in the engine computer but elsewhere. Any legitimate tire store should be able to do this. TPMS transmitters get broken on a regular basis when tires are mounted or dismounted. I strongly advise taking pictures of the labels on the TPMS unit before installing it. OBDII is just generic uniform engine data and codes.

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#12
(08-04-2013, 06:23 AM)Don in Austin Wrote: Do you live somewhere where they salt the road in the winter? That makes a big difference.

Be aware that after a sensor is replacemed some simple programming is required or it will not register with the system and you will have a flashing TPMS light.

Don in Austin -- Auto repair shop owner

Yes, I do, and that makes a lot of sense. The weird thing is that it survived winter fine. It was only recently with all the rain storms that this happened. When it rains, my brake rotors turn brown and the pads stick until I back out of my driveway and use them a couple of times. Then they're shiny again.

I don't know if the mechanic entered any codes, but with my car the TPM light automatically turns off after you've been driving for 15 minutes with the new sensor installed.
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#13
Wink 
Do ResMed or Respionic supply an OEM part for this ? LOL Wink
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#14
(08-05-2013, 11:35 AM)robertbuckley Wrote: Do ResMed or Respionic supply an OEM part for this ? LOL Wink

I bet if I called the local DME they'd find something to sell me. You think I can get sensors on a medicare replacement schedule? Big Grin
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#15
(08-04-2013, 02:17 PM)Paptillian Wrote: The weird thing is that it survived winter fine. It was only recently with all the rain storms that this happened.

You mean that it only broke when the rain washed away the crusted salt that was the only think holding it together?

Edit: Bah: s/think/thing/
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#16
(08-05-2013, 05:47 PM)RonWessels Wrote:
(08-04-2013, 02:17 PM)Paptillian Wrote: The weird thing is that it survived winter fine. It was only recently with all the rain storms that this happened.

You mean that it only broke when the rain washed away the crusted salt that was the only think holding it together?

It wasn't that bad... I do put air in my tires from time to time.

I think there's something in the water Whistle
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#17
A friend of mine mentioned that newer cars aren't using sensors anymore and instead relying on wheel speed differences to detect low tire pressure. Looks like he's right. It's not a new idea, but it's making a comeback and sensors may be going the way of the dodo bird.

http://www.tpmsmanager.com/blog/category/indirect-tpms/

Of course this all probably means that ABS and/or traction control systems may be mandatory in the future instead of options.

Sometimes I wonder... is safety really the goal, or is it just the guise to sell more expensive systems? After all, what charlatan would opt out of safety?! Rolleyes
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