Hello Guest, Welcome to Apnea Board !
As a guest, you are limited to certain areas of the board and there are some features you can't use.
To post a message, you must create a free account using a valid email address.

or Create an Account


New Posts   Today's Posts

Just How Deadly is Untreated Sleep Apnea really ?
#31
About Joan Rivers: there is some deep concerns about the sedation during the endoscopy which was not done in a hospital. when a patient is of the age bracket that Joan Rivers was, it requires less sedation (they mentioned propofol....not sure how to spell it), crash cart close by, oxygen close by, etc. Because this was not done in a hospital setting, when she went into cardiac arrest she had to be transported to a hospital. That meant waiting for an ambulance to arrive and transport her. CPR only provides 30% of oxygen. Joan Rivers was brain dead due to lack of oxygen to the brain. Autopsy is inconclusive and the facility where the procedure was being done is being investigated. Initial thoughts as the cause of death is from the sedation, possibly too much propofol and contributing factors being there was not access to oxygen, etc.

I was given propofol during my endoscopy and colonoscopy (routine 5 year exam) and I had problems with the endoscopy portion (I insisted on having it done in a hospital) and I was given oxygen. Then the colonoscopy was done and I had no issues with that portion of the test. This leads me to believe it was not caused by OSA or I would have continued to have a breathing problem when they were doing the colonoscopy.

I suspect since a scope is placed in the throat for an endoscopy that a narrow throat passage, an excess of tissue in the area and other things contribute to breathing problems with an endoscopy that would not occur during a colonoscopy. If this does happen, access to oxygen and other things such as being in a hospital and not a stand alone facility gives the patient a better chance of recovery and survival.

Joan Rivers had a lot of surgeries in her lifetime and sometimes, that much anesthesia can take a toll on a body. For a long, long time, our daughter had to be taken to the OR and put under anesthesia to debride her and I know that it was a concern to me that she was under anesthesia so much but at the time, it was necessary.

I am not a doctor and I am just expressing my thoughts. I am not discounting that Joan Rivers could have had OSA and I think the big culprit in this case (this is speculation on my part) is that there was not adequate emergency assistance in place and she was not in a hospital setting which delayed getting critical emergency treatment that included oxygen.

Time will tell what caused this to happen to Joan Rivers and I think that there will be a decision that part of the problem was having the procedure done in a stand alone facility and not in a hospital setting.
Post Reply Post Reply
#32
(09-05-2014, 08:55 PM)me50 Wrote: I suspect since a scope is placed in the throat for an endoscopy that a narrow throat passage, an excess of tissue in the area and other things contribute to breathing problems with an endoscopy that would not occur during a colonoscopy. If this does happen, access to oxygen and other things such as being in a hospital and not a stand alone facility gives the patient a better chance of recovery and survival.
Dr.Sanjay Gupta said in an interview this afternoon on CNN that the throat "can" go into spasms during this procedure as well. Maybe another contributing factor.

Post Reply Post Reply
#33
My father had severe OSA. For some reason, when going from regular insurance to COBRA, his CPAP was taken away (he was in compliance). His apnea was so bad, and he would stop breathing for so long, that eventually he died in his sleep at 54 years old.
Apnea will kill you.
Post Reply Post Reply


#34
(09-29-2014, 04:37 PM)CynthiaMueller Wrote: My father had severe OSA. For some reason, when going from regular insurance to COBRA, his CPAP was taken away (he was in compliance). His apnea was so bad, and he would stop breathing for so long, that eventually he died in his sleep at 54 years old.
Apnea will kill you.

Cynthia,

I am sorry for your loss. Sleep apnea is deadly.

My father had a CPAP, etc and yet refused to use it. He gave himself dementia and damaged his heart valve enough it had to be replaced; then died while eating desert.
Evpraxia in the Pacific Northwest USA
Diagnosed: 44 AHI when supine, O2 down to 82%
Treated since 20 Sept 2014:: 0.7 AHI, Settings 7-15, EPR on Full Time at Level 3
Better living through CPAP/APAP machines!
Post Reply Post Reply
#35
(09-29-2014, 04:37 PM)CynthiaMueller Wrote: My father had severe OSA. For some reason, when going from regular insurance to COBRA, his CPAP was taken away (he was in compliance). His apnea was so bad, and he would stop breathing for so long, that eventually he died in his sleep at 54 years old.
Apnea will kill you.
My most sincere condolences, Cynthia.
Post Reply Post Reply
#36
How do you determine the difference between deadly and less deadly and a little bit deadly.
A bullit to the heart is very deadly, a knife to the heart is not as deadly, a pencil in the heart is the least deadly?
Post Reply Post Reply


#37
It's not just a matter of falling asleep at the wheel or being predisposed to Diabetes, etc., but when you are struggling for air you are not providing properly oxygenated blood to your body. Have you ever recorded your SpO2 overnight using something like a Contect 50EW Pulse Oximeter? Long story, but my SpO2 was dropping way low and the family doc suggested that would drive my BP sky high. My epitaph would be "He died peacefully in his sleep". From a massive stroke or aneurism. It is like playing with fire and we have seen it regrettably.
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
Educate, Advocate, Contemplate.
Herein lies personal opinion, no professional advice, which ALL are well advised to seek.



Post Reply Post Reply
#38
(10-01-2014, 06:03 PM)TorontoCPAPguy Wrote: It's not just a matter of falling asleep at the wheel or being predisposed to Diabetes, etc., but when you are struggling for air you are not providing properly oxygenated blood to your body. Have you ever recorded your SpO2 overnight using something like a Contect 50EW Pulse Oximeter? Long story, but my SpO2 was dropping way low and the family doc suggested that would drive my BP sky high. My epitaph would be "He died peacefully in his sleep". From a massive stroke or aneurism. It is like playing with fire and we have seen it regrettably.

I agree with you - my father "played with fire" and refused to use his CPAP/BiPAP or anything else we and the medical folks tried. He died eating his desert, almost with his face in the chocolate pudding.
Evpraxia in the Pacific Northwest USA
Diagnosed: 44 AHI when supine, O2 down to 82%
Treated since 20 Sept 2014:: 0.7 AHI, Settings 7-15, EPR on Full Time at Level 3
Better living through CPAP/APAP machines!
Post Reply Post Reply
#39
(09-03-2014, 02:15 PM)bwexler Wrote: Slightly less dangerous than Russian Roulette...

Since studies show you are 46% more likely to die from untreated SA (than if you are treated), I think maybe "slightly less dangerous" than three pulls in a row at RR.
Post Reply Post Reply


#40
(09-03-2014, 04:14 PM)archangle Wrote: I don't think there are really good numbers.

Actually there has been a bit of work done in the field... and it was some time ago...

One that interested and convinced me is :

Sleep Apnea as an Independent Risk Factor for All-Cause Mortality: The Busselton Health Study

Click on the PDF tab on the page to get the longer document.

HTH

David
Disclaimer: The 'Advisory Member' title is a Forum thing that I cannot change. I am not a doctor and my comments are purely my opinion or quote my personal experience. Regardless of my experience other readers mileage may vary.
Post Reply Post Reply


Possibly Related Threads...
Thread Author Replies Views Last Post
  Sleep Apnea And Bad Dreams? harmon k 11 285 6 hours ago
Last Post: GrammaBear
  mouth guard and sleep apnea Novello1234 6 155 06-26-2017, 03:32 PM
Last Post: Novello1234
  Sleep Apnea can kill you (or at least contribute) PsychoMike 3 271 06-20-2017, 06:38 PM
Last Post: srlevine1
  Fitbit going after the sleep apnea market. DavePaulson 1 172 06-20-2017, 06:24 PM
Last Post: srlevine1
  Carrie Fisher died from 'sleep apnea and other causes' dwd1249 15 659 06-20-2017, 01:48 PM
Last Post: personal111
  I just got my sleep results back and I dont have Sleep Apnea??? Navi 6 386 06-16-2017, 06:43 PM
Last Post: MikeV99
  Sleep Apnea Machine - How many years of use? macheta 3 193 06-15-2017, 10:30 PM
Last Post: PollCat

Forum Jump:

New Posts   Today's Posts




About Apnea Board

Apnea Board is an educational web site designed to empower Sleep Apnea patients.

For any more information, please use our contact form.