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Just learned I have sleep apnea, waiting to hear full results of sleep study
#11
Thank you for all the kind replies and encouragement, it is so very appreciated right now. The only other time I think I've ever been this scared was when the doctors thought I had cancer some years back (I didn't, and it turned out it was just a super rare possibility for me and a nurse just REALLY dropped the ball in communicating that to me).

Around 10 or 11 this morning (it's pretty hazy lol) I moved to the couch and fell asleep pretty quickly. I guess maybe that angle is just better for me right now. I was basically sitting up, but laying kind of on my side. Still had I think a couple rough starts and then woke up a few times throughout, but I did actually sleep for several hours.

I've been reading a bit more, and I've discovered that asthma can make sleep apnea worse, and vice versa? That sucks, but would explain why my sleep has gone fully terrible since I got bronchitis.
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#12
Haven't slept more than a couple hours since my last post. When I try to sleep I just keep jolting awake right away. It's gotten to the point where my body starts pumping adrenaline if I even lie back. I'm just so scared of falling asleep, because I don't want to not wake up. I've mostly gotten myself relaxed as long as I'm awake and just doing something, but the prospect of sleep is terrifying. My asthma is acting up pretty badly too, so breathing is tough even before I fall asleep. Are my fears irrational or unfounded? I can't tell anymore, probably from lack of sleep... Rolleyes
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#13
Your anxiety is understandable, but we're at the beginning of a long holiday weekend, and you'll need to relax and try not to focus on this breathing difficulty as you fall asleep. Make yourself as comfortable as possible and be assured that this jolting awake is just your body's way of reminding you to breath. Somethings that may help you before you can get CPAP is to check out DIY mandibular advancement mouthpiece at the drug store, or a soft, foam cervical collar that keep your neck a little straighter and prevents the airway from closing. These are not necessarily long-term solutions, but might make things a bit easier in the short term.

Any sudden change in your ability to breath or sleep is not likely related to sleep apnea alone. You have developed apnea over a long period of time, and it is not a rapidly progressing condition. Try to relax, and avoid things that may aggravate your asthma.
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#14
Thanks for the tips! I guess a main concern of mine has been that my apnea was getting way worse all of the sudden, but I suppose that doesn't really make sense. I will focus on avoiding asthma triggers for now, and using my 3 inhalers (freaking asthma...)

Thanks again for the reassurances. I think aside from asthma, anxiety is a huge factor in my current troubles. I have not had much anxiety in the past but recently I'm barely able to reason. Looking forward to some sleep!
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#15
I really can relate to what you are going through. I suffered a lot of anxiety between the time I was diagnosed and the day I got my Cpap. I had to wait almost 3 months to get a machine, that's why I slept practically sitting up. I was a total wreck, and pretty sure I wouldn't wake up if I let myself sleep.

But I was wrong....I woke up every time. Smile

Take care of your asthma. I used a nebulizer machine just to help me breath, but found after I started Cpap therapy, I didn't need it as much.

I know from experience your anxiety is real, but you need to try and stay calm. Distract yourself with some other activity. This feeling will pass, and you will be fine.
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#16
(09-01-2016, 03:53 AM)SleeplessInOklahoma Wrote: I never reached REM sleep, and didn't think I had slept at all, but I apparently did!
You'd be amazed at how common this is. When I did my test I didn't think I had fallen asleep. Far from it, I had fallen asleep and was measured at 40 AHI events per hour (30+ is considered severe)!

Quote:I can't seem to decide if I'm relieved that a cure for my high blood pressure may be in sight, or terrified that I now know I have a life threatening condition.
The way I looked at my diagnosis was that it was a blessing to have a condition that can be life threatening that is 100% treatable. And not only is it 100% treatable, but if your conditions are caused by it they can actually REVERSE with treatment! Just to give one example, my memory not only started improving, but long term memories started coming back. Which I wouldn't have believed possible if I hadn't experienced it myself, and then found it so amazing I started reading all the studies confirming this can happen.

Quote:I'm afraid to go to sleep, which I suspect is common upon learning you might just die in your sleep.
Totally understandable but people typically live with apnea for years, sometimes even decades before diagnosis. I'm almost 50 and am positive I lived with it for at least 10 years before diagnosis and maybe many more. So while it increases chances of strokes and heart attacks, the odds something are going to happen to you at your age in the short time you have to wait are SO low. I know that doesn't just make the stress go away, but it may help a little.

The other thing you can do is do everything possible to avoid back sleeping until you find out if you have it and get a machine. For most people, back sleeping makes apnea worse. It's not that it's not there with side sleeping (for those who have it), but it's usually less severe. So try to limit your back sleeping.

Which BTW was another thing I was convinced I never did, and it was only after treatment that I realized I often moved to my back during the night. But because I would usually be on my side when I awoke I didn't realize I often back slept. Some people use a backpack with tennis balls or things like that to stop them from moving onto their back. Again, this would be short term if you want to be extra careful as you wait. Once you have a machine you can sleep however you want.

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#17
Thanks everyone. Still waiting to hear back from the doctor, but we had a long weekend so we'll see. I am doing a bit better with the anxiety and such. I had what my wife told me was a panic attack a few nights back, but I'm staying calmer now. Definitely have a ton of anxiety lately, and I'm not really used to that, so having to learn how to chill better.
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#18
Wooshing in my ear turned out to be a symptom of a much worse condition, so I'm glad yours is figured out. With all the steroids, be sure to regularly check your blood sugar (or have your doc do A1C). That is how I ended up with diabetes in the first place and just 10 days of it earlier this year put me on insulin.
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#19
Hello Sleepless...

Your symptoms sound very much like mine. No hypertension or asthma, the rest seems to fit. During my first study, I felt like I did not sleep either. The texh did not share anything with me other than I was asleep most of the time. It took about 2 weeks for the results to get back to my doc. Then preapproval for the titration study, which is where they will figure out how much pressure is needed to control the symptoms. The lack of quality rem sleep is common. It takes a bit to hit that stage, so it is likely you are waking before you get there. There is times when you may hit it, but dropping to that stage too quickly is also bad.

There is a ton of medical challenges related to apna, hypertension being one of them. You arw prtty young for that, so that could very well be it. I know I was relieved when I got the diagnosis. While yes it is something that you will have to live with, it is very manageable and you will feel mich better with treatment. Your other challenges will also likely be improved with treatment as well.
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