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Larger reservoir for Air Sense 10 Autoset
#11
I tried adding water to my oxygen concentrator and it made the prs1 humidifier water last all night. But, the rainout caused by injecting the water that close to the mask made very loud and annoying gurgling sounds while it was trying to drown me.
I tried an in line water catcher, but once it filled up it actually made things worse.
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#12
Hi RonKMiller,
WELCOME! to the forum.!
It seems like I read here on the board about some people using the Fisher & Paykle humidifier along with the S9Autoset machines but I’m not sure how that would work with the AirSense 10 machines.
Hang in there for more responses to your post and much success to you with your CPAP therapy.
trish6hundred
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#13
[attachment=2132]
(02-09-2016, 11:22 PM)OMyMyOHellYes Wrote: Nope - One thing that has not been mentioned - Respironics has a passive humidificator - Passover - that could be added between the S-10 humidifier and the hose to the user. It wouldn't be heated humidification, but it would add more water volume and might keep the S-10 tank from running dry, or if it does go dry, at least you are still getting some humidification.

Oh, doesn't Fisher & Paykel have an external heated humidificator that could be added in the same fashion?

OMMOHY

I like the way you think! like

I'll have to check it out but love a good DIY challenge. I'm a horizontal thinker.

I'm kind of thinking a simple wide mouth plastic Nalgene bottle - added on the SIDE, with a tapped/barbed hose connection to the tank, might be the answer. The hard part will be to keep the upper level mark on the tank from being exceeded. Might take a bit of experimenting with the height of the hole I'll need to drill on the side of the tank. It's worth a try even having to buy multiple tanks, but I could always plug 'em and save for future use.

Film at eleven. Big Grin

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#14
Maybe, since the reservoir is always going to be either at room pressure or pressurized above room pressure, the nalgene bottle could work like those pet water dispensers. As long as the bottle is sealed and air tight, and the input into the reservoir is below the maximum water level line, the reservoir shouldn't overfill and you could have a functional liter sized (or 3 gallon for that matter) reservoir.

[Image: shopping?q=tbn:ANd9GcTMwmE_XKrNc3c8UibTo...K&usqp=CAE]
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#15
(02-09-2016, 08:41 PM)justMongo Wrote: Some folks I worked for leased office space in the bank buildings in La Jolla CA. That was a great place to work. Near the ocean; great places to eat; and young ladies in swimwear!

La Jolla is beautiful. As long as you don't mind the snotty, pretentious locals, it's perfect. However, if I were a millionaire and lived in that zip code, I would probably be more elitist as well! Too-funny
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#16
(02-10-2016, 02:34 PM)nsherry61 Wrote: Maybe, since the reservoir is always going to be either at room pressure or pressurized above room pressure, the nalgene bottle could work like those pet water dispensers. As long as the bottle is sealed and air tight, and the input into the reservoir is below the maximum water level line, the reservoir shouldn't overfill and you could have a functional liter sized (or 3 gallon for that matter) reservoir.

All of you haven't really thought this through. You will have to pressurize any external reservoir with CPAP pressure. Any pressure differential will cause water to flow in a direction of lower pressure. You flood that internal tank; and the PAP blower unit is a dead box of parts.
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#17
(02-10-2016, 03:51 PM)justMongo Wrote: All of you haven't really thought this through. You will have to pressurize any external reservoir with CPAP pressure. Any pressure differential will cause water to flow in a direction of lower pressure. You flood that internal tank; and the PAP blower unit is a dead box of parts.
It is not nessesary to pressurize the external reservoir.
All you have to do is place it higher than the CPAP watertank.
If your CPAP runs with 12 cmH2O place the external reservoir waterlevel 12 cm higher, if it runs with 15 cmH2O, place it 15 cm higher.

The connecting hose must be installed inside of the original watertank in a way, that it is below the waterlevel when the tank is at max. level.
For example: if the hose ends 1 cm above the bottom, water will start to flow as soon as the waterlevel drops below 1 cm.

This will only work when the cpap is running.
As soon as the pressure is dropping, all the water will dump into the cpaps original tank and destroy the machine.

Better would be a small floatvalve, but that will make it more expensive.

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#18
(02-10-2016, 03:51 PM)justMongo Wrote:
(02-10-2016, 02:34 PM)nsherry61 Wrote: Maybe, since the reservoir is always going to be either at room pressure or pressurized above room pressure, the nalgene bottle could work like those pet water dispensers. As long as the bottle is sealed and air tight, and the input into the reservoir is below the maximum water level line, the reservoir shouldn't overfill and you could have a functional liter sized (or 3 gallon for that matter) reservoir.

All of you haven't really thought this through. You will have to pressurize any external reservoir with CPAP pressure. Any pressure differential will cause water to flow in a direction of lower pressure. You flood that internal tank; and the PAP blower unit is a dead box of parts.

That's an interesting point and thanks for the heads up on potentially trashing a very expensive machine. I've been guilty of "fixing things until they break" more than once. Grin One way around that would be to run another small hose from the top of the CPAP reservoir to the top of the Nalgene bottle. You would have equal atmospheric pressure in both chambers. It might be necessary to bump up the pressure setting a bit to compensate for the extra volume, but I'm comfortable at 9 so figure I'm only using about 50% of the available pressure.

I haven't gotten around to thinking at what level the inlet hose to the CPAP should be mounted but I suspect at the bottom would be preferred. It would seem that the max fill level in the Nalgene bottle would have to be the same as the CPAP reservoir - in which case a more flat rectangular reservoir (also easier to mount the hose barb on a flat vs. curved surface) might make sense since the volume could be increased laterally without relying on height to do it.

I'm not an engineer, but I did stay at a Holiday Inn last night. Too-funny

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#19
(02-10-2016, 04:21 PM)HermannTheGerman Wrote:
(02-10-2016, 03:51 PM)justMongo Wrote: All of you haven't really thought this through. You will have to pressurize any external reservoir with CPAP pressure. Any pressure differential will cause water to flow in a direction of lower pressure. You flood that internal tank; and the PAP blower unit is a dead box of parts.
It is not nessesary to pressurize the external reservoir.
All you have to do is place it higher than the CPAP watertank.
If your CPAP runs with 12 cmH2O place the external reservoir waterlevel 12 cm higher, if it runs with 15 cmH2O, place it 15 cm higher.

The connecting hose must be installed inside of the original watertank in a way, that it is below the waterlevel when the tank is at max. level.
For example: if the hose ends 1 cm above the bottom, water will start to flow as soon as the waterlevel drops below 1 cm.

This will only work when the cpap is running.
As soon as the pressure is dropping, all the water will dump into the cpaps original tank and destroy the machine.

Better would be a small floatvalve, but that will make it more expensive.

That makes sense, but if you *forgot* one night to place the reservoir correctly you may have just trashed the machine as it overflowed... and as noted it would only function when the CPAP is running.

...and as I already mentioned a float valve would be ideal, but dramatically complicate things. Plus if the float valve failed one night while you were sleeping $$$$. Oh-jeez

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#20
    [attachment=2133] I may have just found the ideal reservoir. This packable (which is fantastic since it collapses for travel!) one quart bottle placed on it's side may work well. One tube from the cap to the reservoir base to allow water out, another to the top of the cap to allow CPAP air pressure in... Since it's going to be on it's side - I'll need some volume for the air - I would probably only be able to use half of it's capacity - assuming the max fill level will be the same as the CPAP reservoir. The hard and flat plastic cap should make it easy to mount some tiny nylon hose barbs.
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