Hello Guest, Welcome to Apnea Board !
As a guest, you are limited to certain areas of the board and there are some features you can't use.
To post a message, you must create a free account using a valid email address.

or Create an Account


New Posts   Today's Posts

Long Time User...First Time 'Advanced Detail' User
#21
It will be interesting to see what your doctor changes your prescription to, given you want an auto CPAP device. If it were me, I'd recommend pressure settings of 10 (min) to 20 (max) for the long term, but 10 (min) to 12 (max) until you get used to the device. It really is the case that you will eventually not notice the pressure. Meantime, the ramp feature is your friend. You can start with pressures as low as 4, and have them climb to your minimum setting in as long as 45 minutes (at least for PSR1 machines; I assume ResMed machines have similar settings). Eventually, you will probably find that a pressure of 4 is too low, and it feels like there's not enough air! When you want to try to stop using the ramp, simply turn on the machine and "force" the first two or three breaths, just like blowing up a balloon. At that point, the pressure will stabilize and breathing becomes easier.
Post Reply Post Reply
#22
Thanks for that. My AHI is reducing night on night. I don't know what the AHI was on diagnosis to compare with what I am achieving now. I am finding after the initial 2 nights though that it is a struggle to breath when I put the machine in - it's like there isnt enough oxygen. Wondering if this could be harmful ? or is it just a good workout for the lungs ?


(07-23-2013, 05:42 PM)RonWessels Wrote: Be careful with an auto range of 4 - 20, particularly if your actual effective treatment pressure is 8 or higher.

If you look at the Philips Respironics article on [snip in order to post reply] Non-Responsive Apnea/Hypopnea[/url], you'll see that if the auto CPAP device detects apnea/hypopnea events that are not eliminated after a pressure increase of 3 cmH2O, it treats the events as "non-responsive" and decreases the pressure to "stabilize the airway".

In other words, if your pressure range lower limit is too low for effective treatment, it may be that the device never actually gets to a high enough pressure to treat your apneas/hypopneas!

Post Reply Post Reply
#23
Its probably because you still need to get used to it....it took me a couple of weeks to be comfortable with my first one and it didn't have EPR as an option. It was set to a fixed pressure of 10cm which feels normal for me now but at first felt like an incredible amount of flow pressure which made me feel a bit claustrophobic. The EPR setting and ramp functions should help alleviate the problems of getting used to air being forced in to your airway.
Post Reply Post Reply


#24
Derek, thanks - but I'm actually experiencing the opposite problem of that. When I put the machine in it feels like I'm not getting enough oxygen. It starts off at 4. First thing I did was switch off the ramp function but it still takes time to build up sufficient flow to where I am comfortable. I dread putting the machine in because I am not getting enough air. Was wondering if this is harmful.

(08-04-2013, 06:35 PM)DerekN Wrote: Its probably because you still need to get used to it....it took me a couple of weeks to be comfortable with my first one and it didn't have EPR as an option. It was set to a fixed pressure of 10cm which feels normal for me now but at first felt like an incredible amount of flow pressure which made me feel a bit claustrophobic. The EPR setting and ramp functions should help alleviate the problems of getting used to air being forced in to your airway.

Post Reply Post Reply
#25
(08-07-2013, 03:46 PM)sleepyhead2 Wrote: Derek, thanks - but I'm actually experiencing the opposite problem of that. When I put the machine in it feels like I'm not getting enough oxygen. It starts off at 4. First thing I did was switch off the ramp function but it still takes time to build up sufficient flow to where I am comfortable. I dread putting the machine in because I am not getting enough air. Was wondering if this is harmful.

It's not actually harmful, but you won't get used to feeling air-starved. Most people need a minimum pressure of at least 6 to avoid feeling air-starved. I'm a big guy, and I'm uncomfortable with the pressure set any lower than 8.

Here are the instructions: http://www.apneaboard.com/adjust-cpap-pr...tup-manual and http://www.apneaboard.com/resmed-s9-cpap-setup
Post Reply Post Reply
#26
Thanks a million !! Much appreciated, Derek.

(08-08-2013, 12:42 AM)big_dave Wrote:
(08-07-2013, 03:46 PM)sleepyhead2 Wrote: Derek, thanks - but I'm actually experiencing the opposite problem of that. When I put the machine in it feels like I'm not getting enough oxygen. It starts off at 4. First thing I did was switch off the ramp function but it still takes time to build up sufficient flow to where I am comfortable. I dread putting the machine in because I am not getting enough air. Was wondering if this is harmful.

It's not actually harmful, but you won't get used to feeling air-starved. Most people need a minimum pressure of at least 6 to avoid feeling air-starved. I'm a big guy, and I'm uncomfortable with the pressure set any lower than 8.

Here are the instructions:[Snip to post]

Post Reply Post Reply




Possibly Related Threads...
Thread Author Replies Views Last Post
  Future BiPAP user.. Which machine to ask for? Herb 78 2,155 1 hour ago
Last Post: SarcasticDave94
  Time and Date Wrong on Airsense 10 Autoset biyahero 10 324 9 hours ago
Last Post: lab rat
  Time at Max Pressure Gr8Catter 22 408 Today, 05:05 AM
Last Post: ajack
  [Diagnosis] New user need help interpreting Sleepyhead results fyero 4 107 04-23-2017, 06:44 PM
Last Post: fyero
Rainbow [CPAP] Total Time in Apnea (TTIA) OleJunk 8 266 04-22-2017, 01:26 PM
Last Post: PaytonA
  New user, new diagnosis derekf 31 679 04-20-2017, 11:17 PM
Last Post: PaytonA
Question How Long Before Centrals Subside hartikka 28 1,731 04-20-2017, 07:25 PM
Last Post: richb

Forum Jump:

New Posts   Today's Posts




About Apnea Board

Apnea Board is an educational web site designed to empower Sleep Apnea patients.

For any more information, please use our contact form.