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Maybe I'm Just Weird...
#11
One thing possibly to consider: AHI is only an index of how many events you had per hour. It does not relate in any way to how long each of or any of these events were. 22.7 events per hour that were each 11 seconds long is very different from 22.7 events per hour that were each 51 seconds long, when looked at from the perspective of how those events are negatively affecting you.

While it is true that there is a direct relationship between SA events and 02 desat, just how desaturated you might get is anyone's guess when looking at AHI, because there is no direct relationship between AHI and that. Longer events are directly related to deeper desats, of course, but AHI doesn't provide us with that level of granularity.

Which is why we have oximeters and PSG tests.

So a person may have mild SA (according to AHI readings) and severe desats, or severe AHI, and mild desats.

But the good news is that if you treat the SA, it handles the desats for the most part. If not, other measures might be in order.

Of course how restricted your breathing is also is not a universal constant; an SA event may be equivalent in two people as to how long it is and how restrictive to breathing it is, and one person might get more desatted than the other, simply due to how efficient their breathing is. If you have COPD, for instance, the same mild event that only affects me slightly might affect you much more.

Elevation is probably another factor that will make an equivalent SA event more or less serious, even for or the same exact patient, depending on whether they are at 8800 ft or at sea level. People at high altitudes adapt, but only if their breathing is healthy in the first place.

Respiration is complex, and we use AHI and desat percentages as summary alarms to dumb down the understanding and clear confusion, but when you do that you give up some of the important fine points of that understanding. This is why we need professionals to help us get all of this under control. They understand the fine points. It's not like going to a car website and learning how to put bondo into a crumpled fender. You can learn a lot here, but trust the pros to help you get the fine points of your therapy right.

A number such as AHI or desat percentage is just a number, and is only truly understandable within the big picture.

So no, you're not weird; you're unique, just like the rest of us.
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#12
I think you're going to do great with whatever CPAP therapy you use. I would recommend you try to obtain an auto titrating machine as I think it may be better for people at higher altitudes. I have used mine at places like Allen's Park, Estes, Aspen, and Brekenridge where elevation is similar to where you live. I sleep great at altitude, and heated humidity really makes a difference for me in the cool dry air of Colorado. I have always acclimated quickly and enjoyed lots of skiing, hiking and other activities in CO. Prior to CPAP it was harder to recover at night and go to the 12K+ altitudes the following day.
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#13
(05-13-2015, 06:08 PM)sgearhart Wrote:
(05-13-2015, 03:36 PM)kingskid Wrote: If 90% is low, 70% is what--almost dead?

Rumor has it that if you have a 0% for 10 minutes or more, you are no longer allowed to post on this forum.

Oh-jeez
"Freedom is the oxygen of the soul."
Moshe Dayan
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#14
(05-14-2015, 09:52 AM)Sleeprider Wrote: I think you're going to do great with whatever CPAP therapy you use. I would recommend you try to obtain an auto titrating machine as I think it may be better for people at higher altitudes. I have used mine at places like Allen's Park, Estes, Aspen, and Brekenridge where elevation is similar to where you live. I sleep great at altitude, and heated humidity really makes a difference for me in the cool dry air of Colorado. I have always acclimated quickly and enjoyed lots of skiing, hiking and other activities in CO. Prior to CPAP it was harder to recover at night and go to the 12K+ altitudes the following day.

Hi Sleeprider. Yes, I am definitely going for an auto CPAP. Depending on the results of my upcoming titration test, I am right now looking at the S9 auto for her with H5i and Climateline heater tube and the Airfit P10 nasal pillow mask. I see lots of folks here use both of those items. Been living at 6,000+ altitude here in Colorado since 1989, and the 8800' for 9 months. Love it here and the CPAP will be a great benefit.
"Freedom is the oxygen of the soul."
Moshe Dayan
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#15
(05-13-2015, 08:10 PM)TyroneShoes Wrote: One thing possibly to consider: AHI is only an index of how many events you had per hour. It does not relate in any way to how long each of or any of these events were. 22.7 events per hour that were each 11 seconds long is very different from 22.7 events per hour that were each 51 seconds long, when looked at from the perspective of how those events are negatively affecting you.

While it is true that there is a direct relationship between SA events and 02 desat, just how desaturated you might get is anyone's guess when looking at AHI, because there is no direct relationship between AHI and that. Longer events are directly related to deeper desats, of course, but AHI doesn't provide us with that level of granularity.

Which is why we have oximeters and PSG tests.

So a person may have mild SA (according to AHI readings) and severe desats, or severe AHI, and mild desats.

But the good news is that if you treat the SA, it handles the desats for the most part. If not, other measures might be in order.

Of course how restricted your breathing is also is not a universal constant; an SA event may be equivalent in two people as to how long it is and how restrictive to breathing it is, and one person might get more desatted than the other, simply due to how efficient their breathing is. If you have COPD, for instance, the same mild event that only affects me slightly might affect you much more.

Elevation is probably another factor that will make an equivalent SA event more or less serious, even for or the same exact patient, depending on whether they are at 8800 ft or at sea level. People at high altitudes adapt, but only if their breathing is healthy in the first place.

Respiration is complex, and we use AHI and desat percentages as summary alarms to dumb down the understanding and clear confusion, but when you do that you give up some of the important fine points of that understanding. This is why we need professionals to help us get all of this under control. They understand the fine points. It's not like going to a car website and learning how to put bondo into a crumpled fender. You can learn a lot here, but trust the pros to help you get the fine points of your therapy right.

A number such as AHI or desat percentage is just a number, and is only truly understandable within the big picture.

So no, you're not weird; you're unique, just like the rest of us.

Hello TyroneShoes. Thanks for all the good points. I received my sleep test results in the mail yesterday and don't know what to make of the numbers so will post all that a little later today. My dr. didn't say much about it, except to tell me the AHI and low oxygen. You're right; we are all unique. God didn't use a cookie cutter on us. It'd be a boring life otherwise!Smile
"Freedom is the oxygen of the soul."
Moshe Dayan
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#16
The reason lots of use the S9 is because it has been the de facto choice of many professionals for a long time. Fewer use the Airsense, but not because the Autoset is better, but because the newer machine is not as well distributed yet. If you are getting in the game now, I would go for the newest machine you can get. The older Resmeds don't measure RDI, which is something some folks may find important.
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#17
(05-16-2015, 06:41 PM)TyroneShoes Wrote: The reason lots of use the S9 is because it has been the de facto choice of many professionals for a long time. Fewer use the Airsense, but not because the Autoset is better, but because the newer machine is not as well distributed yet. If you are getting in the game now, I would go for the newest machine you can get. The older Resmeds don't measure RDI, which is something some folks may find important.

Oh, that's a good point. I have been vacillating between the two, but having the newest machine does make sense....
"Freedom is the oxygen of the soul."
Moshe Dayan
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#18
The newest machine has some compromises depending on your needs. Everything is integrated, particularly the modem and the humidifier. The treatment, other than the "For Her" algorithms in the Autoset, seem pretty much unchanged. If you want to be able to separate the humidifier, or not have a wi-fi modem hooking into Resmed, then the S9 is an entirely acceptable machine. Retail cost is the same, but there are certainly more S9s on the used market.
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#19
(05-13-2015, 04:01 PM)kingskid Wrote:
(05-13-2015, 03:43 PM)Sleeprider Wrote: Out of curiosity, at what elevation did you conduct your study?
I lived at 6,000+' prior to getting married 9 months ago, so have been at this 8800' altitude for awhile.

If you are thinking about an Airsense A10 its Operating Altitude is Sea Level to 8500'. That doesn't mean it will not work at 8800' but my concerns would be with the warranty.


Using FlashAir W-03 SD card in machine. Access through wifi with FlashPAP or Sleep Master utilities.

I wanted to learn Binary so I enrolled in Binary 101. I seemed to have missed the first four courses. Big Grinnie

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#20
(05-17-2015, 08:21 AM)Sleeprider Wrote: The newest machine has some compromises depending on your needs. Everything is integrated, particularly the modem and the humidifier. The treatment, other than the "For Her" algorithms in the Autoset, seem pretty much unchanged. If you want to be able to separate the humidifier, or not have a wi-fi modem hooking into Resmed, then the S9 is an entirely acceptable machine. Retail cost is the same, but there are certainly more S9s on the used market.

Good points, Sleeprider. And yes, I have been concerned about that modem. I tend to like controlling my privacy, and having the humidifier separate is appealing, too.
"Freedom is the oxygen of the soul."
Moshe Dayan
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