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Poll: PAP Breathing Habits
This poll is closed.
In and out nasal
75.00%
12 75.00%
In and out mouth
12.50%
2 12.50%
In thru nose out thru mouth
6.25%
1 6.25%
In thru mouth out thru nose
6.25%
1 6.25%
Both in Both out
0%
0 0%
Total 16 vote(s) 100%
* You voted for this item. [Show Results]

Mounth Breathing in or out?
#1
I typically swim 3 miles twice a week and utilize a breathing technique where I inhale through my mouth and exhale through my nose.

This is typically of breath training for exhaustive exercise. I have this so imbedded in those little gray cells that I when I wake up I am always inhaling thru my mouth and exhaling through my nose.

I always go to sleep using the DariaVader tongue technique breathing through my nose but at sometime during the night habit takes over.

How many mouth breathing variants do we have in the forum and what kind of impact odes this have to our therapy.
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#2
I doubt I could swim three miles if a Great White was behind me! Before I joined the forum, I called the DariaVader tongue technique "how people normally breathe". So file me under "will get up in the middle of the night and do a saline rinse to avoid having to breathe through my mouth". Mouth breathing -- hate it! Big Grin
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#3
I don't think what you are doing has any negative effect on your therapy, here's why.

The objective of CPAP is to maintain a positive pressure in your airway. When your mouth is closed, the pressure is just fine. When you only inhale through your mouth, air is going in and not out so the pressure is still fine.

Mouth breathing with CPAP is when you open our mouth and air escapes, causing the pressure to drop below therapeutic levels and this is not what is happening with you

I have no idea how you do it, but don't see a problem with it. Your machine should also not flag it as leaking, if what you describe is actually what you are doing.
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#4
(06-28-2016, 01:22 PM)chill Wrote: I doubt I could swim three miles if a Great White was behind me! D

Laugh-a-lotRolling laughLaugh-a-lot
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#5
I'm a swim coach and one of my biggest bugbears with my younger swimmers is making sure they breathe out effectively when they swim any stroke (as opposed to holding their breath under water). This is a major issue with butterfly where inexperienced swimmers will try to both exhale then inhale as their head clears the water. They don't have the time to do this to execute the stroke properly. I have a number of drills I put them through to encourage good breathing habits.

I always encourage them to breathe out and in using their mouth as good air exchange is a vital compenent in swimming. They have to breathe at least every three strokes for freestyle to make sure that they inhale enough air and also exhale enough air. The inhale is quick and the exhale is slow. As they get older I work on using a nasal exhale for the longer distances only but it's not vital. A really good swimmer will exhale through both their mouth and nose at the same time.
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#6
I'm a nose breather, but... when I get stuffy nose, mouth breathing starts on auto pilot... (it's strange too as occasionally I don't get stuffy until close to bed time..wt*?? )
I enjoy being with a group who like to share their "Hosehead" experiences, to remind me I am not alone.
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#7
I inhale on every other stroke, (right side when freestyle) I exhale slowly under the water though during the stroke.(except on backstroke) I was always told exhaling through the nose keep the water out. Maybe that's an out-of-date concern.

of course I have never been a "really good" swimmer

Thanks Coach
Do you ever find yourself inhaling though your mouth when on CPAP?

(06-29-2016, 04:35 AM)holden4th Wrote: I'm a swim coach and one of my biggest bugbears with my younger swimmers is making sure they breathe out effectively when they swim any stroke (as opposed to holding their breath under water). This is a major issue with butterfly where inexperienced swimmers will try to both exhale then inhale as their head clears the water. They don't have the time to do this to execute the stroke properly. I have a number of drills I put them through to encourage good breathing habits.

I always encourage them to breathe out and in using their mouth as good air exchange is a vital compenent in swimming. They have to breathe at least every three strokes for freestyle to make sure that they inhale enough air and also exhale enough air. The inhale is quick and the exhale is slow. As they get older I work on using a nasal exhale for the longer distances only but it's not vital. A really good swimmer will exhale through both their mouth and nose at the same time.

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#8
Reading about breathing techniques for swimming is interesting. Not being able to breathe correctly has always been the major thing keeping me from enjoying swimming freestyle stroke. (That, and my tendency to wander over into the next lane. I don't mind that so much myself, but the person in the next lane doesn't like it.)

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#9
I've been wanting to ask this question somewhere, and this seems like the right place. I almost never see any "large leaks" scored, but pretty much every night, I can see "expiratory mouth breathing" (aka mouth leaking) on my breathing flow rate waveform. It tends to happen at the same time as I'm having high-event periods (REM sleep?) It usually only happens for about 20-30 minutes total.

My questions. I have to be losing my tongue seal a little bit for air to come out of my mouth, don't I? Sometimes I will see the "unintentional leak rate" increase from zero to around 3-5 l/min during the mouth leaking, but other times it stays at zero.

I suppose my biggest question is whether this sort of mouth leaking affects my therapy.
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#10
Keeping the water out of your nose is a very similar technique to the tongue suck technique recommended to prevent mouth breathing.

Yes, years of swimming probably turned me into a mouth breather. I'm now seeing CPAP start to reverse this process. My soft cervical collar has done wonders in helping with the process.

(06-29-2016, 07:36 AM)0rangebear Wrote: I inhale on every other stroke, (right side when freestyle) I exhale slowly under the water though during the stroke.(except on backstroke) I was always told exhaling through the nose keep the water out. Maybe that's an out-of-date concern.

of course I have never been a "really good" swimmer

Thanks Coach
Do you ever find yourself inhaling though your mouth when on CPAP?

(06-29-2016, 04:35 AM)holden4th Wrote: I'm a swim coach and one of my biggest bugbears with my younger swimmers is making sure they breathe out effectively when they swim any stroke (as opposed to holding their breath under water). This is a major issue with butterfly where inexperienced swimmers will try to both exhale then inhale as their head clears the water. They don't have the time to do this to execute the stroke properly. I have a number of drills I put them through to encourage good breathing habits.

I always encourage them to breathe out and in using their mouth as good air exchange is a vital compenent in swimming. They have to breathe at least every three strokes for freestyle to make sure that they inhale enough air and also exhale enough air. The inhale is quick and the exhale is slow. As they get older I work on using a nasal exhale for the longer distances only but it's not vital. A really good swimmer will exhale through both their mouth and nose at the same time.

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