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Need help interpreting SP02 report
#1
Hi there,

So I am getting a real sleep test once my insurance approves it, but in the mean time I decided to sleep with a SP02 monitor and see if it indicated sleep apnea.

I'm not sure how to interpret the results. There are spikes in pulse every hour or two that correspond with a dip in SP02. I would think that would indicate that I stopped breathing, my oxygen levels dropped, and then my heart rate jumped when I started breathing again trying to catch my breath.

Also I'm only 30 and very fit, so if I did have sleep apnea, maybe that is why my report is atypical? I wake up exhausted every day, have to get up to pee every night, and have had high blood pressure for the last 15 years.

   
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#2
I think the spikes are artifact and your results are within normal range. Oximeters are prone to artifact, reading the baseline is what is important.
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#3
Hi! tiredofbeingtired,

Welcome

I'm inclined to go with Dagmar. Simple movement or bumping of the probe can induce these artifacts. Nothing to worry about.
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#4
Hi tiredofbeingtired,
WELCOME! to the forum.!
Hang in there for help with interpreting your report.
Much success to you and hopefully you can get a sleep study done, soon.
trish6hundred
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#5
I wish mine looked like yours and mine are not all that bad anyway. Understand that I DO have sleep apnea even though my O2 levels are fine
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#6
(09-19-2015, 02:03 AM)tiredofbeingtired Wrote: So I am getting a real sleep test once my insurance approves it, but in the mean time I decided to sleep with a SP02 monitor and see if it indicated sleep apnea.

I'm not sure how to interpret the results. There are spikes in pulse every hour or two that correspond with a dip in SP02. I would think that would indicate that I stopped breathing, my oxygen levels dropped, and then my heart rate jumped when I started breathing again trying to catch my breath.

Hi tiredofbeingtired,

If we are having an obstructive apnea we are trying to breathe but are unable, and I think our body tends to give us a jolt of adrenalin to become aroused enough to overcome the obstructive apnea, which increases our heart rate.

I think your interpretation of your SpO2 report is reasonable, especially since you are having symptoms which may be caused by OSA.

Which type of Pulse Oximeter are you using?

I think the kind worn on the wrist with separate finger cup are both more comfortable and less susceptible to artifact false blips in their data caused by movement.

Take care,
--- Vaughn
Membership in the Advisory Member group should not be understood as in any way implying medical expertise or qualification for advising Sleep Apnea patients concerning their treatment. The Advisory Member group provides advice and suggestions to Apnea Board administrators and staff on matters concerning Apnea Board operation and administrative policies - not on matters concerning treatment for Sleep Apnea. I think it is now too late to change the name of the group but I think Voting Member group would perhaps have been a more descriptive name for the group.
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#7
I'm a former RT and while I'm no longer in the field my interpretation is that your O2 Sat never dropped below 97% and your heart rate was mostly between 60 - 80. The spikes look like artifact from movement. I can't tell you how many times I've silenced alarms due to that. Anyway, I'm no longer working as an RT so my interpretation is as a layman. I wish my report looked yours! Having said that, I agree get your sleep test and be sure.
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#8
tiredofbeingtired,

The SpO2 cannot change instantaneously.

The time scale of the posted report does not allow us to see fine detail in how quickly the recorded SpO2 changes.

I suggest you zoom in on all the large dips to see if the large dips drop and come back in a discontinuous manner, in just a second or two (definitely not valid) or gradually, smoothly taking tens of seconds for a sizable change (likely valid, I think).




Membership in the Advisory Member group should not be understood as in any way implying medical expertise or qualification for advising Sleep Apnea patients concerning their treatment. The Advisory Member group provides advice and suggestions to Apnea Board administrators and staff on matters concerning Apnea Board operation and administrative policies - not on matters concerning treatment for Sleep Apnea. I think it is now too late to change the name of the group but I think Voting Member group would perhaps have been a more descriptive name for the group.
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#9
Good point, vsheline! If you can zoom in that would be most helpful.
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#10
Hello, Based the graphic that you posted it is difficult to say what is happening. Looking at the graph I assume you use a Contec pulseOX. If so in your report output from their software towards the top of the page you will see a section with "Event Data" In this area look for % Artifact. This will give you an indication of what the machine thinks are artifacts caused by motion, light, etc on the sensor.

You can always play with the recorder to see how YOUR body reacts to effects. Start with recording for about a half hour while sitting and resting (not sleeping) try not moving the finger with the probe and see what the data looks like. (this tells you more about your equipment than you) You can also do this laying down (I would fall asleep quickly so for me that would not work). This will give an indication of what might be typical for you.

Another one I like to try is to record for 10 minutes or so to get a baseline, then try holding your breath for as look as you can (assuming there is no medical reason to not do this) and see what the effect is. This will tell you how quickly YOUR body is using O2 and the graph will indicate what you can expect to see in a nights recording if you stop breathing. Not 100% but it will give you a good idea for sure. You can also try hyperventilating and see the effects (again assuming no underlying medical conditions where you should not do this).

So - my opinion - the best way to start to understand the data is to play with the recordings and see the effects... You also should develop an understanding on how the PulseOX works, as that will help to understand the accuracy and effects.

I will try to post a link to " how medical equipment works" for pulse oximeter as that site has a good explanation of how these things work... howequipmentworks.com/pulse_oximeter/ (as of 2015 09 19 the link is working)
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