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New to CPAP...
#1
I just got a called from the DME to let me know they verified insurance, etc., and I asked what machine the physician ordered. This is the info I was given:

Respironics CPAP Model 460TS. In digging around on Philips' site, it appears to correspond with the REMstar Pro C-flex+ with heated tube humidifier, model DS460TS. So, my question is how does this compare to what I've been reading about the ResMed S2 Autoset that seems to be a preferred model by a lot of folks?

My test was done with full face mask, which I really did not find too uncomfortable and was able to sleep on my side with some shifting around of the pillows. I am most definitely a mouth breather...lots of sinus issues and very narrow nasal passages (ENT has said basically only choice there is surgery) and no matter what I do, my nose stuffs up within 2-3 hours of going to sleep, so I foresee that always being an issue no matter the mask style, so my goal is to figure out the mask style that best accommodates a mouth breather. I have spent time on the boards reading comments about different masks and welcome any feedback/insight on masks that are good for mouth breathers who side sleep.

Thanks!
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#2
(12-18-2013, 11:04 AM)rascalsmom Wrote: Respironics CPAP Model 460TS. In digging around on Philips' site, it appears to correspond with the REMstar Pro C-flex+ with heated tube humidifier, model DS460TS. So, my question is how does this compare to what I've been reading about the ResMed S2 Autoset that seems to be a preferred model by a lot of folks?
The Respironics CPAP Model 460TS is also called the PR System One Series 60 CPAP Pro with C-Flex+. It is a high quality CPAP, but it is a CPAP rather than an APAP. It is more closely equivalent to the Resmed S9 Elite rather than the S9 AutoSet.

The PR System One Series 60 PRO (model 460) is a machine that has these features:
  • Records full efficacy data and has a CA/OA detection algorithm.
  • Has an optional heated hose
  • Has a "smart" humidifier, even if you don't use the heated hose
  • Has C-Flex+ as a form of exhalation relief.
  • Has a ramp.
What the PR System One Series 60 PRO does not have is an Auto mode that automatically adjusts the pressure in response to the various kinds of events that it records.

If you really want an APAP, you might have better luck asking the DME to provide you with the PR System One Series 60 CPAP Auto CPAP (model 560) in the Respironics line of machines. It does everything the Resmed S9 AutoSet does, although there are some differences in the Auto algorithms the two machines use and the way exhalation relief is accomplished. For most new PAPers, there's not enough of a difference between the Resmed S9 AutoSet and the PR System One Auto to matter.

Asking which APAP is "better" is really like asking Coke and Pepsi fanatics, "Which tastes better? Coke or Pepsi?" In other words, there are people out there who have better luck with the PR System One Auto and there are also people out there who have better luck with the Resmed S9 AutoSet, but for most people the differences between how the two machines feel in use and the quality of the therapy delivered is so small that it's hard to actually tell them apart.

It's also worth keeping in mind that some DMEs have a very strong preference for only supplying one line of machines, in part because that means they only have to maintain one piece of professional software for monitoring their patients' data. That's another reason that you might have more luck requesting the DME supply you with the System One Auto instead of the Resmed S9 Auto. Moreover, the PR System One AUTO machine typically costs the DME less than the Resmed S9 AutoSet, and that affects the DME's bottom line because they're going to get the exact same $$$ from your insurance company regardless of whether they sell you the PR System One PRO, the PR System One AUTO, or the Resmed S9 AutoSet. And that too may make it easier for you to persuade them to set you up with a System One AUTO rather than a Resmed S9 AutoSet.
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#3
Welcome hosehead~!

As a long-time mouth breather, my nose surgery was well worth what I went through (just a thought)...
*I* am not a DOCTOR or any type of Health Care Professional. My thoughts/suggestions/ideas are strictly only my opinions.

"Only two defining forces have ever offered to die for you. Jesus Christ and the American Soldier. One died for your Soul, the other for your Freedom."
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#4
Welcome rascalsmom, on the masks, if you are a mouth breather you will need a full face mask. They take a bit of getting used to but work well for mouth breathers.
I sleep on my back and can sleep on either side with my mask, we can give you more tips when you get the mask of your choice.
Make sure you get one that is comfortable for you and has the least amount of leaks as possible.
I have been using the a Resmed Quattro Air for about a month which is the newest Resmed on the market, after using the Mirage Quattro for a couple of years.
Don't worry about your sleep position anything can be overcome getting the right mask is the most important thing, good luck.
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#5
(12-18-2013, 11:04 AM)rascalsmom Wrote: I just got a called from the DME to let me know they verified insurance, etc., and I asked what machine the physician ordered. This is the info I was given:

Respironics CPAP Model 460TS. In digging around on Philips' site, it appears to correspond with the REMstar Pro C-flex+ with heated tube humidifier, model DS460TS. So, my question is how does this compare to what I've been reading about the ResMed S2 Autoset that seems to be a preferred model by a lot of folks?

My test was done with full face mask, which I really did not find too uncomfortable and was able to sleep on my side with some shifting around of the pillows. I am most definitely a mouth breather...lots of sinus issues and very narrow nasal passages (ENT has said basically only choice there is surgery) and no matter what I do, my nose stuffs up within 2-3 hours of going to sleep, so I foresee that always being an issue no matter the mask style, so my goal is to figure out the mask style that best accommodates a mouth breather. I have spent time on the boards reading comments about different masks and welcome any feedback/insight on masks that are good for mouth breathers who side sleep.

Thanks!
Hi rascalsmom, welcome to the forum
You cannot go wrong with either Phillips Respironcis System One (PRS1) or Resmed S9, both makes good machines and useless machines
PRS1: avoid model numbers below 460 and PRS1 SE, model number printed on the label at the bottom of the machine
[remove water tank if checking at home]
Resmed S9: avoid Escape models, model name printed on top of the machne, next to on/off button

Your DME have an obligation to give you what the doctor wrote on the prescription, so if you wanted an auto machine (model number 560) which can used in either CPAP (fixed pressure) or APAP modes, than you need to ask the doctor to specify the machine and pressure range setting on the prescription and write "dispense as written" so wont be any confusion.

The 60 series machines comes with the heated hose option which is the same as S9 climateline or Fisher Paykel thermosmart hoses

Full face masks works best for mouth breathers as allows you to breathe through your nose or mouth without compromise to the treatment.
Check with your DME, some have "mask return policy" allows you to try a mask at home and return within 30 days if the mask did not work for you so you can try another one

I had septoplasty and turbinate reduction surgery last year out of desperation, did not help a great deal with stuffy nose but my pressure did come down couple of cmH2O. What I find most helpful using saline sinus rinse bottle at night and warming up the humidifier so the air does not feel cold when start treatment, the heated hose is godsend



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#6
I have a Remstar machine and it is making a high pitched squealing sound, I have no insurance so I can't get a new one, so how can I clean the inside and take machine apart without ruining it? any help sure would be nice
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#7
Hi rascalsmom,
WELCOME! to the forum.!
You might have to try several different masks till you find the right one that works for you.
Best of luck to you with your CPAP therapy.
Hang in there for more responses to your post.
trish6hundred
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#8
Thanks robysue, Peter_C, Tez62, zonk and trish6hundred. I did read all of your responses when they were posted. I got my equipment and subsequently have had two respiratory illnesses back to back Sad, so haven't been spending much time on the computer and have been remiss in coming back here and thanking everyone for their input.

I stuck with the machine they had told me I was getting, with the assurance that if the physician saw a need to change to an APAP, it would be done. This was information from the physician's office, not the DME.

If we ever get done passing colds and flu around, maybe I will get a better feel of how well it is all going to work, but overall it seems to be helping. I do find I don't do well with it when I have a respiratory infection with a lot of congestion, though, so will need to discuss with the physician at followup more about how to handle this, as right now I have had to skip a few nights just simply because I felt way to claustrophobic with not being able to breath well even with decongestants.

I will persevere and make it work for me! On a funny note, I have a 14-year-old son who has autism and he doesn't think much of it. The first night, he kept asking "You will take it off in the morning??" He has decided that he doesn't like sneaking into bed with mom so much any more, so that's a good thing...he's decided sleeping in his bed isn't such a bad thing Banana -- I consider that a good side effect!
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#9
rascalsmom, glad you got a solution to your son coming in and waking you in the mornings and glad the CPAP seems to be working for you.
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#10
Feeling icky and trying to get used to your machine at the same time is a real pain, I do feel for you. FYI - I have found that I do not suffer as much when sick as I sleep much better with my dream machine when sick, I just crank the humidity to just before rain-out and breathe the warm moist air. (Just wash your mask more often when you are sick)
*I* am not a DOCTOR or any type of Health Care Professional. My thoughts/suggestions/ideas are strictly only my opinions.

"Only two defining forces have ever offered to die for you. Jesus Christ and the American Soldier. One died for your Soul, the other for your Freedom."
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