Hello Guest, Welcome to Apnea Board !
As a guest, you are limited to certain areas of the board and there are some features you can't use.
To post a message, you must create a free account using a valid email address.

or Create an Account


New Posts   Today's Posts

New to the world of Apnea
#1
Hi,
I have been lurking on the forum for the last few days before I posted.
My basic history is that I have been suffering from headaches (waking up) that were partially alleviated through hot packs, coffee and (at times) Imigran. I have also been suffering fatigue, low energy and brain fog over the last number of years. As I am a bit of migrainer I had attributed most of my symptoms to the headaches.

I am of normal weight (156 pounds) for 5 foot 11 and don't have any other ailments. I also have a partner who sleeps like the dead and given I am not aware I snore (sleep mainly on my side) has never noticed me snoring or not breathing at night.

I went and saw an ENT (Ear/Nose/Throat) Dr about a year ago (amongst many things over the past number of years) who recommended I use Nasenex to deal with the morning headaches as I have a deviated septum from rugby damage and he claimed I was a mouth breather (albeit I don't wake with a dry mouth).

Anyway, the long and short of it was things were not getting better. - continued brain fog, low energy, negative moods, and seemingly poorer memory. I had suspicions regarding sleep apnea as my father (75yo) had been diagnosed a few years ago and uses a cpap. I had put this theory to the ENT Dr who dismissed it. My father and grandfather ( since passed) have/had dementia. I wonder if apnea had anything to do with this as my fathers dementia has not progressed like standard Alzheimers.

3 weeks ago I got a referral from my Dr to have a home sleep test which I picked up from Res Sleep. The sleep study came back with an AHI of 17. Apparently most of it was hypopnea and only a few actual OSA and CSA. My oximeter had a nadir of 85% and a lot of incidences of greater than 4% below per hr (cannot remember).

So, on going back to Res Sleep (who surprisingly only sell ResMed CPAPs...) I have picked up an AirSense 10 for one month. I have been using it for 4 nights and its amazing how much better I am feeling (no haze, more energy). It appears that the unit (when I looked in the the settings) hasn't really been adjusted at all. The pressure is just std 4-20 with no ramp and it shows I have been using an average pressure of 7.16. I have been recording an AHI of 1.6 -1.9.

I don't mind the N10 mask and tried the pillow but didn't like it. I have ordered the Wisp nasal mask after reading comments which I expect to receive next week. I haven't setup any software yet.

I was wondering if there is something I should be considering on doing/changing to improve things? I say this although the change (my daily feeling) seems to be transformative (fingers crossed).

thanks
Fred
Post Reply Post Reply
#2
(02-19-2015, 05:40 PM)Dafod Wrote: I haven't setup any software yet.

I was wondering if there is something I should be considering on doing/changing to improve things? I say this although the change (my daily feeling) seems to be transformative (fingers crossed).

I think you should definitely download the "SleepyHead" software and install it and use it. You will learn a lot about your Apnea from the graphs and figures it provides. The more you know the more easily you can judge what changes might be best.

You can download the ResScan software too, but I have both installed and the SleepyHead program is clearly better.

Either will allow you to print out a report to take to your doctor. The more your doctor knows about how you are doing the better, too.
Ed Seedhouse
VA7SDH

I am neither a Doctor, nor any other kind of medical professional.

Actually you know, it is what it isn't.
Post Reply Post Reply
#3
Dafod, welcome, I would leave everything as it is till you have been using it for a while. If things aren't broken, don't try and play with fate. A lot of us get that instant burst of energy when we start as our bodies and brains have been so straved of oxygen for so long. Sometimes it drops off after a few days / weeks then as you heal, you start to feel fresher again long term.

I do believe Sleep Apnea could be one of the causes of Alzheimers, if we are not getting blood and oxygen to our brains, who knows what damage it is doing.
Similar to people with heart problems etc, it all seems to fit together.
Post Reply Post Reply


#4
(02-19-2015, 05:40 PM)Dafod Wrote: Hi,
I have been lurking on the forum for the last few days before I posted.
My basic history is that I have been suffering from headaches (waking up) that were partially alleviated through hot packs, coffee and (at times) Imigran. I have also been suffering fatigue, low energy and brain fog over the last number of years. As I am a bit of migrainer I had attributed most of my symptoms to the headaches.

I am of normal weight (156 pounds) for 5 foot 11 and don't have any other ailments. I also have a partner who sleeps like the dead and given I am not aware I snore (sleep mainly on my side) has never noticed me snoring or not breathing at night.

I went and saw an ENT (Ear/Nose/Throat) Dr about a year ago (amongst many things over the past number of years) who recommended I use Nasenex to deal with the morning headaches as I have a deviated septum from rugby damage and he claimed I was a mouth breather (albeit I don't wake with a dry mouth).

Anyway, the long and short of it was things were not getting better. - continued brain fog, low energy, negative moods, and seemingly poorer memory. I had suspicions regarding sleep apnea as my father (75yo) had been diagnosed a few years ago and uses a cpap. I had put this theory to the ENT Dr who dismissed it. My father and grandfather ( since passed) have/had dementia. I wonder if apnea had anything to do with this as my fathers dementia has not progressed like standard Alzheimers.

3 weeks ago I got a referral from my Dr to have a home sleep test which I picked up from Res Sleep. The sleep study came back with an AHI of 17. Apparently most of it was hypopnea and only a few actual OSA and CSA. My oximeter had a nadir of 85% and a lot of incidences of greater than 4% below per hr (cannot remember).

So, on going back to Res Sleep (who surprisingly only sell ResMed CPAPs...) I have picked up an AirSense 10 for one month. I have been using it for 4 nights and its amazing how much better I am feeling (no haze, more energy). It appears that the unit (when I looked in the the settings) hasn't really been adjusted at all. The pressure is just std 4-20 with no ramp and it shows I have been using an average pressure of 7.16. I have been recording an AHI of 1.6 -1.9.

I don't mind the N10 mask and tried the pillow but didn't like it. I have ordered the Wisp nasal mask after reading comments which I expect to receive next week. I haven't setup any software yet.

I was wondering if there is something I should be considering on doing/changing to improve things? I say this although the change (my daily feeling) seems to be transformative (fingers crossed).

thanks
Fred

First off, Welcome to the Group!
Wow your off to a good start!, If you went from an AHI of 17 to 1.6 in four days AND you don't mind your mask you doing VERY WELL!!
I'd take things slowly and don't make too many adjustments at one time, If you decide to change things like your pressure just give things time to adjust.
Right now I'd leave things alone other than getting your software(Sleepyhead/ResScan) in place so you can track things.
Always check in here time to time you will receive a lot of good advise.
Great Job!
Sleep-well
Post Reply Post Reply
#5
Dafod,
Welcome to the forum! Wow, your numbers are great.
I agree with all above... Leave setting alone for now and watch
your progress on sleepyhead.
Eventually, maybe after a few weeks, you should consider narrowing that pressure range. Leaving it wide open at 4 to 20 isn't always the best setting.
Well-done
OpalRose
Post Reply Post Reply
#6
Hi Dafod,
WELCOME! to the forum.!
Wow, you're off to a good start, GREAT JOB.!
I wouldn't make any changes, at least for now, since you are doing so well.
Hang in there for more suggestions and much success as you continue your CPAP therapy.
trish6hundred
Post Reply Post Reply


#7
Thanks for all the responses and advice. I wasn't sure if I was doing all that well.

Anyway, I think I can tolerate the nasal mask pretty well due to having smashed my nose in my youth. It required surgery and face plaster cast for 2 weeks. Essentially I got used to sleeping with something covering my face pretty quickly. I now have named myself Mr Snuffaluffagus, and the kids seem to like it
Post Reply Post Reply
#8
Hi Fred,

I agree with everyone that you are off to a great start.

However, as to whether or not you should make any changes? Download the sleepyhead reports so you/we can start to see what is really going on. As a general rule, I really dislike the 4 and 20 blackbird settings they sometimes leave the machines at. To me, it's a way to get people started with therapy without having to really research their individual condition. Once that's determined, I think it's very useful to narrow the ranges to get a more precise treatment tailored to the individual.
Post Reply Post Reply
#9
I agree with retired_guy about downloading the Sleepyhead software to monitor your therapy. It can be very helpful and reinforcing. A wide open APAP is pretty common, and not too many of us can live with the 4 cm starting pressure. Considering you're spending the night at 7.0 I have a suggestion. If you feel like you are struggling for breath at the beginning of the night, you probably are. Changing the minimum pressure to 6.0 can alleviate that.

Since the "system" saddled you with a nasal mask, if mouth leaks are not a problem with you, you're going to love changing that to nasal pillow. If you are in your first month of therapy, talk to your DME about exchanging your nasal POS with the Resmed Airfit P10. This is a nasal pillows mask with minimal contact and the best air diffusion of any mask. No jet of cold air blowing on you or your bed partner, comfortable, and considerably reduced leaks. Many of us began with the antiquated nasal mask...for heavens sake, as a healthy young person, upgrade!
______________________________________________
Organize your SleepyHead Data
Post your SleepyHead Data from Imgur
Robysue's Beginner's Guide to Sleepyhead
Post Reply Post Reply


#10
Good for you. The feeling of wellbeing is wonderful, but you may have the same thing in store for you that I did. The instant refreshing result does sort of fade out a little. The lasting things are the attitude, concentration, clear headedness. Now that you are getting good sleep, you may gradually start craving more sleep. It is unlikely that you'll awake with that 'I feel lousy, don't want to go anywhere' feeling anymore.

I would not be at all surprised that oxygen deprivation and your body's reaction to it can bring on dementia. Studies are available that dementia patients (apnea or not) had halted progression when subjected to CPAP. It is more likely that the link is the disrupted sleep versus the oxygen desaturation. By the way, I am sorry about your grandfather and dad. Hopefully you can work with your dad and keep him sleeping well, and that partial reversal or halting of dementia results. I also have lost friends and family members to dementia. I suggest you find ways to tease his brain immediately prior to his sleep. Variation and getting challenges to the brain before bed have shown to be most effective as the brain works on these during sleep. Better recall and more reasoning strength result.

Your sleep test results say you had some episodes that starved you of oxygen enough to cause cell damage, (nadir of 85). But, as far as the damage of cells is concerned, the other figure (multiple desaturations of 4% or more) does not matter much. Most of those are drops from untreated apneas, and are likely drops from 98-99% down to low 92-95%, none of those were particularly damaging.

Your apneas were causing you not to be able to get deep enough sleep to eliminate the fogginess. Now treated, you won't have the disruptions. You will feel even better as you go. Feeling more energetic is usually a more long term result. Anger management and happiness typically result. You may even feel a spontaneous desire to skip or dance.

Ok - so I would not change a thing at the moment. In 20 or so days, you may have a better idea of whether to narrow settings or raise the start pressure. If you stayed with this machine, you probably will as some point desire a slightly higher start pressure. Since your average pressure is about 7.16, a start pressure of 6 is not a bad choice.

Good luck as these wonderful days are dawning for you.

QAL
Dedicated to QALity sleep.
You'll note I am listed as an Advisory Member. I am honored to be listed as such. See the fine print - Advisory Members as a group provide advice and suggestions to Apnea Board administrators and staff concerning Apnea Board operation and administrative policies. Membership in the Advisory Member group should not be understood as in any way implying medical expertise or qualification for advising Sleep Apnea patients concerning their treatment.
Post Reply Post Reply


Possibly Related Threads...
Thread Author Replies Views Last Post
Sad Sinus congestion, APAP, and the end of the world jeffmackatron 8 433 01-16-2017, 07:53 PM
Last Post: Hydrangea
  How come the CPAP world hasn't embraced the theory of interchangable parts DPerretta 5 387 11-16-2016, 07:50 PM
Last Post: Sleeprider
  Newbie in the sleep apnea world Rousseau21 4 680 02-04-2016, 09:38 AM
Last Post: Rousseau21
  Need Portable Battery Suggestions for 3rd World bayareacpap 0 531 10-19-2015, 05:07 PM
Last Post: bayareacpap
  The thoughts that I have on Apnea Board, and two other Apnea/PAP related forum ares. BiLevel48 15 4,703 04-30-2015, 07:05 AM
Last Post: SaldusMiegas
Cool Upgrade time what's new in the world of masks? Advice plz MsDixie 9 2,688 10-31-2013, 09:57 PM
Last Post: archangle
  The World of DME's SleepEZ 33 10,976 08-11-2013, 05:46 PM
Last Post: archangle

Forum Jump:

New Posts   Today's Posts




About Apnea Board

Apnea Board is an educational web site designed to empower Sleep Apnea patients.

For any more information, please use our contact form.