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New to this - I'm not getting enough air
#11
Hello Opal,

Yes, the setting for the DreamWear mask is X1 and for my Nuance Pro it's X2. I set each code prior to use.

As I've written, I like the Nuance Pro, but the DreamWear was uncomfortable and the slit opening can get mashed closed. So I'll be continuing with the Nuance for a while. I haven't even unpacked my third mask, the Wisp.

Thank you for your help.

Alan
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#12
Help Please:

If I enter the provider mode and set my DreamStation to CPAP (not auto), will the knob then adjust the pressure while in the user mode?

Thank you,

Alan
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#13
No. The pressure is set in the clinician menu. It's "normally" not made available to the user.
So, if you are comfortable with navigating the clinician menu, you can go to set pressure.

A preference by a significant number of people on auto cpap is to stay in auto mode; but limit the latitude the machine has to work in.

The PR machines seem a bit less aggressive in raising pressure compared to ResMed; so most people on PR auto machines need a floor pressure closer to what would be the higher percentile pressure found by a "wide-open" trial. That is why reference to 90 and 95 percentile pressures are made when considering a minimum pressure.
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#14
Many Thanks justmongo.

I tried setting the minimum pressure to 10, then 8, then 6. In each case I can feel air blowing out the vent holes at the center of the mask (where the hose attaches) while I inhale. I feel the blow-by by holding my hand about 5 inches in front of the vent holes. Obviously the lower minimums had less blow-by. But it's still substantial at 6.

I pressed the Nuance mask (which fits each nostril separately) harder against my nostrils, to be certain of a leak-free fit. But it still blows out the vent holes when I inhale.

So an earlier message suggesting that I don't need much pressure seems correct.

Next session, I'll give the Wisp mask a try.

Best regards,

Alan
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#15
Alan, quit foolin' around and get the Resmed Airfit P10 pillows mask. Even with higher pressure it is very hard to hear or feel the intentional venting of air from this mask's diffuser. It appears you tolerate nasal therapy, now get the one you will be using next year.
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#16
That venting is to flush the CO2 out of the mask.
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#17
I'm have some success at reducing the RLS pain of sleeping by using CPAP. I can't declare total victory, but I've seen some promising results.

Alan
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#18
(12-04-2016, 06:52 PM)Sleeprider Wrote: Alan, quit foolin' around and get the Resmed Airfit P10 pillows mask. Even with higher pressure it is very hard to hear or feel the intentional venting of air from this mask's diffuser. It appears you tolerate nasal therapy, now get the one you will be using next year.

Thank you, I've ordered it. It sure looks like my Nuance Pro. Last night, I tried my third mask, the Wisp. I like it best of the three. For the first hour I found it comfortable but there was a lot of air noise. Then I tightened the straps and it was suddenly almost silent.

The machine never raised the pressure above my minimum setting of 10 with the Wisp. But the previous night it settled on 12.2 with the Nuance Pro.

Alan

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#19
Sounds like you have an impressive collection. At the end of this, you'll have to give us your review. Anyway, your best mask in in the mail... Smile
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#20
I did some googling of RLS CPAP today and discovered that I wasn't the first to try CPAP for RLS. There have been formal studies with promising results. For example I'm barred from putting the link here, but you can google "Prevalence of restless legs syndrome among patients with obstructive sleep apnea before and after CPAP treatment, compared to the general population." A quote from this paper follows:

"Subjects using CPAP had a decreased prevalence of RLS from 25.7% to 13.8% while no change was observed in those subjects not using CPAP (p=0.04 for difference between groups). Conclusions: RLS is more prevalent among OSA patients than controls. CPAP treatment decreases RLS symptoms significantly."

Regards,
Alan
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