Hello Guest, Welcome to Apnea Board !
As a guest, you are limited to certain areas of the board and there are some features you can't use.
To post a message, you must create a free account using a valid email address.

or Create an Account


New Posts   Today's Posts

Newbie
#1
Hi everyone This is my first forum. I have had sleep apena for a long time. I have used my CPAP Machine for a very long time. I have had no real good results from it. I mean I really tried like a year try. I have seen my sleep specialist, I have ENT specialist, I have four sleep studies. they all say the same thing. I have a surgery scheduled for the 29th of OCT. The UPPP. I was hoping to get some advice to see what people think.
Post Reply Post Reply
#2
Hi Crystal Ann,
WELCOME! to the forum.!
I'm sorry you are having a rough time getting used to CPAP therapy because I think it is the better way to go, rather than the surgery you mentioned. I have not heard many good things about UPPP. hang in there for more suggestions, as mine is not the only opinion.
Best of luck to you.
trish6hundred
Post Reply Post Reply
#3
Welcome to the forum. I know what it is like to be the Newbie on the forum. I will let those that are more knowledgeable respond to your questions.
Post Reply Post Reply


#4
Crystal Ann, welcome, I have heard it is a very painful operation with limited success, the few that have had it have only changed the severity of sleep apnea and have still needed to use a CPAP, they all regretted it, but evryone is different and if that is what you want to do I wish you the best of luck with it. Personally I'm wrapped with the results of my CPAP and will never look for an alternative.
Post Reply Post Reply
#5
I am not an expert, but wikipedia contains an entry for this procedure Of course, wikipedia is not an expert source either, so take it for what it is worth.

The entry states in part:

Success

The effectiveness of UPPP in isolation

When UPPP has been administered in isolation, the results are variable. As explained above, sleep apnea is often caused by multiple co-existing obstructions at various locations of the airway such as the nasal cavity, and particularly the base of the tongue. The contributing factors in the variablility of success include the pre-surgical size of the tonsils, palate, uvula and tongue base. Also, patients who are morbidly obese (body mass index >40 kg/m2) are significantly less likely to have success from this surgery.

Effectiveness of "The Stanford Protocol" operation

Over one thousand people have undergone The Stanford Protocol operation and received follow-up sleep study testing. The results have been that 60 to 70 percent of patients have been entirely cured. In approximately ninety percent of patients, a significant improvement can be expected.

Multilevel approach In the recent years, many surgeons have tried to address the multiple levels of obstruction by performing multiple procedures during on the same surgical day, called the "multi-level approach" (septum, turbinates, UP3, base of tongue, etc. at the same time). This approach seems to importantly improve postoperative results in very well selected patients.[citation needed]


Risks

One of the risks is that by cutting the tissues, excess scar tissue can "tighten" the airway and make it even smaller than it was before UPPP. Some individuals who have undergone UPPP as a stand alone procedure have written on internet forums that they experienced a worsening of their breathing following UPPP[1][2][3]. Others have spoken of severe acid reflux.

After surgery, complications may include these:

Sleepiness and sleep apnea related to post-surgery medication
Swelling, infection and bleeding
A sore throat and/or difficulty swallowing
Drainage of secretions into the nose and a nasal quality to the voice. English language speech does not seem to be affected by this surgery.
Narrowing of the airway in the nose and throat (hence constricting breathing) snoring and even iatrogenically caused sleep apnea.
Patients who have had the uvula removed will become unable to correctly speak French or any other language that has a uvular 'r' phoneme.

In 2008, Dr. Labra, et al., from Mexico, published a variation of UP3, by adding a uvulopalatal flap, in order to avoid such complications, with a good rate of success.[1]
Post Reply Post Reply
#6
(08-16-2013, 08:37 PM)Crystal Ann Wrote: I have seen my sleep specialist, I have ENT specialist, I have four sleep studies. they all say the same thing.

Hi Crystal Ann, welcome to the forum!

Regarding "they all say the same thing", what exactly was said?

If possible, I suggest again trying to use your AutoSet machine and posting data from your machine on this forum for comments and suggestions.

Or even just installing SleepyHead or ResScan and looking over and posting data for some of the days you last used your machine.

Take care,
--- Vaughn
Membership in the Advisory Member group should not be understood as in any way implying medical expertise or qualification for advising Sleep Apnea patients concerning their treatment. The Advisory Member group provides advice and suggestions to Apnea Board administrators and staff on matters concerning Apnea Board operation and administrative policies - not on matters concerning treatment for Sleep Apnea. I think it is now too late to change the name of the group but I think Voting Member group would perhaps have been a more descriptive name for the group.
Post Reply Post Reply


#7
My sister has a friend that had surgery for sleep apnea. they cut her esophagus during surgery and because of this, she had a long recovery period once they determined she would live. She is still on cpap therapy.
Post Reply Post Reply
#8
Welcome to the forum!!! We are glad you joined us!!! Welcome
INFORMATION ON APNEA BOARD FORUMS OR ON APNEABOARD.COM SHOULD NOT BE CONSIDERED AS MEDICAL ADVICE. ALWAYS SEEK THE ADVICE OF A PHYSICIAN BEFORE SEEKING TREATMENT FOR MEDICAL CONDITIONS, INCLUDING SLEEP APNEA. INFORMATION POSTED ON THE APNEA BOARD WEB SITE AND FORUMS ARE PERSONAL OPINION ONLY AND NOT NECESSARILY A STATEMENT OF FACT.
Post Reply Post Reply
#9
Let us know what you decide. Would be glad to see what your monitoring results are from rescan or sleepy head. Wishing you the best in whatever choice you make!
Post Reply Post Reply




Possibly Related Threads...
Thread Author Replies Views Last Post
  Greetings From a Newbie rooy1960 12 347 04-18-2017, 06:57 AM
Last Post: rooy1960
  Another newbie F Mac 14 414 04-06-2017, 08:52 AM
Last Post: bonjour
  Greetings from a newbie age237 9 305 03-19-2017, 08:19 PM
Last Post: Beej
  newbie brother 78 4 227 02-04-2017, 04:17 PM
Last Post: trish6hundred
  newbie yossarian 14 1,006 09-01-2016, 02:01 PM
Last Post: Maskup Sleepwell
  From a Newbie to a newbie PappinLikeABoss 11 1,318 08-22-2016, 05:38 PM
Last Post: chill
Exclaimation Greetings from a newbie Rjhoeper 17 1,390 04-16-2016, 10:24 PM
Last Post: DeepBreathing

Forum Jump:

New Posts   Today's Posts




About Apnea Board

Apnea Board is an educational web site designed to empower Sleep Apnea patients.

For any more information, please use our contact form.