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Newbie Question
#1
I have a general question for you guys.  I've been using CPAP for 2 months and everything (readings,getting used to sleeping with mask,etc.) has been fine.  I believe I have had Sleep Apnea for many years and was totally exhausted when I received my diagnosis.  I felt better immediately.  Here is my question/concern.  I am still very tired.   Does it take a certain amount of time to recoup one's energy level totally--and is that even possible?  I am retired, so I am able to get in 8 hours of quality sleep and the instances of apnea came down from 73 per hour to 1.5.   I'm just concerned that this is as good as I will feel and that I have damaged by body for so long that there is little hope of a recovery.    Your personal stories would be very helpful to me at this point.
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#2
It does take time for most of us. It's going to take 3-12 months for your brain to repair
http://www.sleep-apnea-guide.com/sleep-a...brain.html
For new auto cpap users. From machine data or sleepyhead, it is suggested to initially set the max CPAP pressure higher (1 or 2 cm) than the 95% pressure. The minimum a little lower than the median pressure. This will get you quickly into range. Fine tuning can be done from there, with the help of the forum.
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#3
Can you explain a little more about "brain repairing"? I don't understand what is happening.
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#4
Sleep apnea damages the brain's white and gray matter, it takes a while to return to a normal state. The link I posted and the studies that are also linked in the article would answer a lot of your questions.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25142557
Results in pre-treatment OSA patients showed impairments in most cognitive areas, mood and sleepiness that were associated with diffuse reduction of WM fiber integrity reflected by diminished fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD) in multiple brain areas. After 3 months of CPAP, only limited changes of WM were found. However, over the course of 12 months CPAP treatment, an almost complete reversal of WM abnormalities in all the affected regions was observed in patients who were compliant with treatment. Significant improvements involving memory, attention, and executive-functioning paralleled WM changes after treatment.
CONCLUSIONS:
Changes of WM DTI "signatures" of brain pathology in OSA patients are appreciable over the course of 12-month treatment with CPAP in most of the regions involved. Recovery of cognitive deficits after treatment is consistent with the presence of a reversible structural neural injury in OSA in patients who were compliant with treatment.

full study
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4153061/
For new auto cpap users. From machine data or sleepyhead, it is suggested to initially set the max CPAP pressure higher (1 or 2 cm) than the 95% pressure. The minimum a little lower than the median pressure. This will get you quickly into range. Fine tuning can be done from there, with the help of the forum.
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#5
Hi suzpigott,
Like you, I've had sleep apnea many years before being diagnosed.  Untreated SA over a period of many years can no doubt do damage to your body.  

Your AHI was 73 before treatment.  That means you stopped breathing 73 times an hour.  

That's a constant dozing off and being aroused all night.  Alot of that you're not even aware is happening, but the damage accumulates over time if left untreated.  This can cause or aggrevate already existing illnesses, like heart disease, diabetes, high blood pressure, etc.  
Your AHI is 1.5, so you are doing well with that.

The good news is that once you are on therapy for awhile, many (including myself) find that some things improve, like high blood pressure.  

Be sure you have regular checkups and blood work done to rule out anything else that might cause you to feel tired.  Having low Vitamin D levels and a Thyriod out of kilter can be culprits.

Like you, I adapted to therapy easily enough, but it did take almost 8 months to start feeling like I had more energy.  Give it some time.
OpalRose
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#6
Thanks so much for your comment.  It gives me hope!   And I think keeping a positive attitude will help get me back to feeling 100%.
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#7
Definitely check for other things too.  Taking Vitamin D supplements after a year of feeling like you do now helped me a lot.  I recommend getting your levels tested and working with a doctor and regular re-tests to get you levels up to the mid range.  I had to go it alone and was taking 15K IU a day for a couple of week and and now down to 4-5K IU a day (and it is summer).  I think that low Testosterone was also having an effect, but I think that you can rule that out!   Grin  Don't assume that sleep apnea is the only issue.  Keep digging.
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#8
I just had annual physical 3 months ago and all my panels are normal. I take Vit D and Magnesium supplement daily. I am on anti depression med and BP med. I believe the culprit is my current weight -- gained 40 pounds in 4 years and I have no motivation to get up and move. But I'm trying to set small goals.
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#9
Hi suzpigott,
WELCOME! to the forum.!
It takes time for your body to get used to CPAP therapy, so hang in there, it dose get better.
It sounds like you are off to a pretty good start.
Good luck to you on your CPAP journey.
trish6hundred
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#10
How much Vitamin D you do take?  Most recommendations are woefully inadequate. 

When I responded to CPAP therapy, my depression was almost totally resolved.  Have hope!
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