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Normal Snoring
#11
(03-08-2012, 10:48 PM)Cutter Wrote: I think that the actual medical term is mask flatulence. Maybe you have heard of that term.

Yes, that's a much less graphic term, I suppose... okay, I guess I'll use "mask flatulence" from now on instead of mask farts.

Thanks Cutter for helping me to be more civilized. Bigwink Smile
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#12
(03-08-2012, 10:28 PM)lesdavdel Wrote:
(03-08-2012, 02:24 PM)SuperSleeper Wrote:
(03-08-2012, 02:12 PM)zonk Wrote: Snoring is not normal with CPAP, sometimes mask fart mistaken as snoring.

Too-funny Dielaughing

Never heard that medical term before. GoodOne

No. I have had a CPAP for 6 years, so I know a little about it. I think there is a difference. A lot of people snore and they don't have sleep apnea.

Well...honestly, snoring *is* apnea. It's the same mechanical action. It's just not causing those other snorers to actually stop breathing often enough, or for long enough, to affect their health (if they stop at all.) If you ever have the opportunity to listen to a room full of snorers, you can hear the stops and starts etc.
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#13
(03-09-2012, 10:09 AM)CHanlon Wrote:
(03-08-2012, 10:28 PM)lesdavdel Wrote:
(03-08-2012, 02:24 PM)SuperSleeper Wrote:
(03-08-2012, 02:12 PM)zonk Wrote: Snoring is not normal with CPAP, sometimes mask fart mistaken as snoring.

Too-funny Dielaughing

Never heard that medical term before. GoodOne

No. I have had a CPAP for 6 years, so I know a little about it. I think there is a difference. A lot of people snore and they don't have sleep apnea.

Well...honestly, snoring *is* apnea. It's the same mechanical action. It's just not causing those other snorers to actually stop breathing often enough, or for long enough, to affect their health (if they stop at all.) If you ever have the opportunity to listen to a room full of snorers, you can hear the stops and starts etc.

I would respectfully disagree- snoring IS NOT apnea. Apnea is a lack of breathing- no air is being moving. By default, if one is snoring, air is moving. Snoring is certainly associated with apnea, but is not apnea.

Back to the orignal post, "what is the difference be 'normal' snoring and apnea?" I would say the difference is if apnea or hypopnea is involved. There are people who snore, but who are breath perfectly fine. The do not have any significant AHI and do not desaturate when snoring. So, to me, the difference is if there is any clincally significant AHI issues or desaturations invovled.
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#14
(03-09-2012, 10:09 AM)CHanlon Wrote:
(03-08-2012, 10:28 PM)lesdavdel Wrote:
(03-08-2012, 02:24 PM)SuperSleeper Wrote:
(03-08-2012, 02:12 PM)zonk Wrote: Snoring is not normal with CPAP, sometimes mask fart mistaken as snoring.

Too-funny Dielaughing

Never heard that medical term before. GoodOne

No. I have had a CPAP for 6 years, so I know a little about it. I think there is a difference. A lot of people snore and they don't have sleep apnea.

Well...honestly, snoring *is* apnea. It's the same mechanical action. It's just not causing those other snorers to actually stop breathing often enough, or for long enough, to affect their health (if they stop at all.) If you ever have the opportunity to listen to a room full of snorers, you can hear the stops and starts etc.

OK! I guess that is one way to look at it. I did turn my pressure up a bit (from 6 to 7) and my wife said I was better. Actually, the purpose of my original question was to determine if turning up the pressure would help and I think it may have. I don't feel like getting another sleep test for this minor tweaking. I have my annual visit with my Doctor next month and will discuss it with him. Thanks!
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#15
OK, I will go out on a limb here.

Snoring in itself does not necessarily mean one has Sleep Apnea.
Or, they have Sleep Apnea so mildly that a CPAP is not even prescribed.

But, if one does have Sleep Apnea & you either start snoring again or do not stop snoring, chances are you might need a higher pressure.

As lesdavdel reported, raising his pressure from 6 to 7 did seem to help.

As always, if you are in doubt, always consult your Sleep Doctor.

The 3 times in 13+ years that my pressure was increased by my Sleep Doctor was because I reported a very low (sound) level of snoring.
In all 3 cases, my Sleep Doctor just raised my pressure by 2 each time based on that information alone. If "my" Sleep Doctor raises anyones pressure, it is for the minimum of 2.

If one does raise their pressure, "I" would do it no more than 1 at a time.
Then use your machine at that new pressure for a week or more to see whether or not it has any effect. You can always reduce it if needed.
Using the ResMed Mirage SoftGel Nasal Mask with a chinstrap

I do not use either the Ramp nor the EPR Comfort features

Have been on CPAP since December 1998

This is my 3rd machine

I use the ResMed ResScan Software (Version 3.16)
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#16
(03-09-2012, 04:07 PM)Steven Wrote: OK, I will go out on a limb here.

Snoring in itself does not necessarily mean one has Sleep Apnea.
Or, they have Sleep Apnea so mildly that a CPAP is not even prescribed.

But, if one does have Sleep Apnea & you either start snoring again or do not stop snoring, chances are you might need a higher pressure.

As lesdavdel reported, raising his pressure from 6 to 7 did seem to help.

As always, if you are in doubt, always consult your Sleep Doctor.

The 3 times in 13+ years that my pressure was increased by my Sleep Doctor was because I reported a very low (sound) level of snoring.
In all 3 cases, my Sleep Doctor just raised my pressure by 2 each time based on that information alone. If "my" Sleep Doctor raises anyones pressure, it is for the minimum of 2.

If one does raise their pressure, "I" would do it no more than 1 at a time.
Then use your machine at that new pressure for a week or more to see whether or not it has any effect. You can always reduce it if needed.

are you speaking of the high number or the low number? for instance mine is 8-12. if i never get to 12, whats the point of raising the high number? just trying to get it clear in my mind.
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#17
(03-09-2012, 04:14 PM)greatunclebill Wrote:
(03-09-2012, 04:07 PM)Steven Wrote: OK, I will go out on a limb here.

Snoring in itself does not necessarily mean one has Sleep Apnea.
Or, they have Sleep Apnea so mildly that a CPAP is not even prescribed.

But, if one does have Sleep Apnea & you either start snoring again or do not stop snoring, chances are you might need a higher pressure.

As lesdavdel reported, raising his pressure from 6 to 7 did seem to help.

As always, if you are in doubt, always consult your Sleep Doctor.

The 3 times in 13+ years that my pressure was increased by my Sleep Doctor was because I reported a very low (sound) level of snoring.
In all 3 cases, my Sleep Doctor just raised my pressure by 2 each time based on that information alone. If "my" Sleep Doctor raises anyones pressure, it is for the minimum of 2.

If one does raise their pressure, "I" would do it no more than 1 at a time.
Then use your machine at that new pressure for a week or more to see whether or not it has any effect. You can always reduce it if needed.

are you speaking of the high number or the low number? for instance mine is 8-12. if i never get to 12, whats the point of raising the high number? just trying to get it clear in my mind.

Those 3 increases were all on dumb machines on straight CPAP & not on the Auto I now have.

If one has an Auto, deciphering snoring is easier because the level of snoring is noted & you would probably be hitting at the upper level of your pressure range. If so, "I" would raise the upper level of the Auto pressure range.
Using the ResMed Mirage SoftGel Nasal Mask with a chinstrap

I do not use either the Ramp nor the EPR Comfort features

Have been on CPAP since December 1998

This is my 3rd machine

I use the ResMed ResScan Software (Version 3.16)
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#18
(03-09-2012, 04:07 PM)Steven Wrote: OK, I will go out on a limb here.

Snoring in itself does not necessarily mean one has Sleep Apnea.
Or, they have Sleep Apnea so mildly that a CPAP is not even prescribed.

But, if one does have Sleep Apnea & you either start snoring again or do not stop snoring, chances are you might need a higher pressure.

As lesdavdel reported, raising his pressure from 6 to 7 did seem to help.

As always, if you are in doubt, always consult your Sleep Doctor.

The 3 times in 13+ years that my pressure was increased by my Sleep Doctor was because I reported a very low (sound) level of snoring.
In all 3 cases, my Sleep Doctor just raised my pressure by 2 each time based on that information alone. If "my" Sleep Doctor raises anyones pressure, it is for the minimum of 2.

If one does raise their pressure, "I" would do it no more than 1 at a time.
Then use your machine at that new pressure for a week or more to see whether or not it has any effect. You can always reduce it if needed.

Stephen,

Thanks for the input. I agree that we should not increase the pressure much without the Sleep Doctor's concurrence. I think I am OK at "7" and will have a month's worth of experience before I see him in early April. If I am still happy, I would want him to change my prescription so the CPAP provider will also be on-board.

My insurance will pay for a sleep test, but it is a pain!!! In any case, I am glad I am at the low end of the scale!
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#19
(03-09-2012, 04:21 PM)Steven Wrote:
(03-09-2012, 04:14 PM)greatunclebill Wrote:
(03-09-2012, 04:07 PM)Steven Wrote: OK, I will go out on a limb here.

Snoring in itself does not necessarily mean one has Sleep Apnea.
Or, they have Sleep Apnea so mildly that a CPAP is not even prescribed.

But, if one does have Sleep Apnea & you either start snoring again or do not stop snoring, chances are you might need a higher pressure.

As lesdavdel reported, raising his pressure from 6 to 7 did seem to help.

As always, if you are in doubt, always consult your Sleep Doctor.

The 3 times in 13+ years that my pressure was increased by my Sleep Doctor was because I reported a very low (sound) level of snoring.
In all 3 cases, my Sleep Doctor just raised my pressure by 2 each time based on that information alone. If "my" Sleep Doctor raises anyones pressure, it is for the minimum of 2.

If one does raise their pressure, "I" would do it no more than 1 at a time.
Then use your machine at that new pressure for a week or more to see whether or not it has any effect. You can always reduce it if needed.

are you speaking of the high number or the low number? for instance mine is 8-12. if i never get to 12, whats the point of raising the high number? just trying to get it clear in my mind.

Those 3 increases were all on dumb machines on straight CPAP & not on the Auto I now have.

If one has an Auto, deciphering snoring is easier because the level of snoring is noted & you would probably be hitting at the upper level of your pressure range. If so, "I" would raise the upper level of the Auto pressure range.

now i'm understanding what the snore numbers mean. ours are all mostly 1.00 with occasional 4, well below even our minimum pressures. i guess they could mostly be mask farts and not even snoring.
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#20
(03-09-2012, 05:04 PM)greatunclebill Wrote: now i'm understanding what the snore numbers mean. ours are all mostly 1.00 with occasional 4, well below even our minimum pressures. i guess they could mostly be mask farts and not even snoring.

I don't use SleepyHead as you do, so I can't comment on what it shows for snoring. I use the ResMed ResScan Version 3.16.

Some have reported that the snore loudness shown in the ResScan data can be increased by merely dragging the hose along your pillow, etc., etc.

So, I would not be alarmed with some limited snoring noted, especially if all of the other numbers are great.
It might not be snoring at all.
Using the ResMed Mirage SoftGel Nasal Mask with a chinstrap

I do not use either the Ramp nor the EPR Comfort features

Have been on CPAP since December 1998

This is my 3rd machine

I use the ResMed ResScan Software (Version 3.16)
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