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Not getting enough air
#11
RE: Not getting enough air
(06-28-2018, 06:15 PM)SueDonym Wrote: I'm still a newbie here, but I'm getting used to using the CPAP.

When I wear the mask (dreamwear nasal pillow) with no hose attached, I can breathe fine.  However when I have it hooked up to the CPAP (dreamstation go auto) I feel like breathing is hard work.  Like the pipe isn't big enough.  The CPAP supplier suggested that it's because the pressure isn't high enough (6cm).  But since I can get enough air at 0cm (no CPAP) I disagree.

What do you guys think?

I think they are right, 6 is quite low and if you require more air that the machine is supplying you have to fight to get it.
Without a machine attached you simply pull the air through you require.  This is why I do not use ramp, I always feel as if I am suffocating and fighting the machine to get enough air.
Also, if you are using nasal pillows, start with the biggest size and if to big, go down a size rather than the other way round.


Quote:But since I can get enough air at 0cm (no CPAP) I disagree.

You have no machine connected, therefore no resistance against the air flow.
I am NOT a doctor.  I try to help, but do not take what I say as medical advice.


Every journey, however large or small starts with the first step.

Sleep-well
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#12
RE: Not getting enough air
There seems to be some confusion...

With no hose attached - breathing is easy.

With 6cmw breathing seems impeded.

With 8cmw breathing is ok.

From what I understand from you guys. At 6cmw the CPAP isn't providing enough air, this is where I become confused. If it's supplying a CONSTANT 6cmw, that's a lot more than the 0cmw which I can easily breathe (with the mask not attached to anything). I guess that the CPAP isn't actually maintaining true constant pressure. It can't keep up when I inhale. Is that correct?
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#13
RE: Not getting enough air
I have no clue but I will throw some things out there. When you don't have any hose I'm guessing your standing or sitting up. If that's the case you would breath easy due to no restriction on air due to the vents plus you can breath through your mouth. Now if you turn on the machine with the hose connected your probably lying down. If you sleep on your side there's a good chance the flow is getting cut off on the side of the mask. Also the fact that you can't breath in through your mouth with the machine on may make it feel like you can't breath. I don't know if any of this is happening but it's something to check out.
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#14
RE: Not getting enough air
You are not receiving 0 cm with the hose not attached, you are drawing in an unrestricted amount at whatever rate your lungs pull in - probably 8 cm or more. 

When you have the hose attached, but the machine switched OFF, you are trying to PULL air through the restriction of the filter material with the strength of your lungs. 

Once you turn the machine ON the fan motor PUSHES air through the filter and up the hose to your lungs, it needs to push "x" cm to be sufficient for what your lung draw capacity requires.

If you are feeling starved for air at 6 cm, then you need to go up to 8 cm and see how that goes. 

Think of breathing through your CPAP hose as the same as sucking water through a garden hose.

Garden hose not connected = no resistance when sucking on the hose. 

Hose connected with tap OFF = you can't suck water through.

Hose connected with tap ON = water being pushed through to your mouth. 

The more you turn the tap up ( increase CM volume ) the more your mouth/lungs fills with water.

The same principal applies with the air you need, but you need the machine to push the required volume through the filter and on up to your lungs.
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#15
RE: Not getting enough air
 I am well aware that the automatic on off of machines is not even common. I have been on CPAP since '92 and this machine is the first to have that feature - also have Airmini which has it too. It has taken me some time to get used to it, but I do love it, especially in the motorhome where the machine is on a step back under the side of the bed, a real pain to reach for the 3 AM trip to the head. 

It would seem hard to believe someone was trying to breath through a CPAP without having it on. Not sure what would be accomplished other than asphyxiation.
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#16
RE: Not getting enough air
(07-06-2018, 10:37 PM)xctraveler Wrote: It would seem hard to believe someone was trying to breath through a CPAP without having it on. Not sure what would be accomplished other than asphyxiation.

You can't suffocate wearing a CPAP mask, even if the hose is connected and the machine off.. there is a vent that is designed to let excess air/exhaled air out ( the machine pumps a constant positive flow, it does not cut off when the patient exhales ).. this vent will also allow air to be breathed in if the machine is off. 

Although my Dreamstation has the "auto on/off" feature, I have never tried it, I have my machine easily accessible even when I set up in a motel or tent.
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#17
RE: Not getting enough air
I can't stand manual start, i love the auto start feature on the resmed machines, I get into bed, get comfy and then put the mask on, take a breath and everything's running. no ramp, no delay, straight in at set pressure.

"go hard or go home" hehehe I could never get used to sucking for air until the ramp timer expired so i turned it off. Also means i can take the mask off and everything shuts off with no issues, and re-starts if i have a power outage.
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#18
RE: Not getting enough air
(07-08-2018, 02:43 AM)matthewb Wrote: I can't stand manual start, i love the auto start feature on the resmed machines, I get into bed, get comfy and then put the mask on, take a breath and everything's running. no ramp, no delay, straight in at set pressure.

"go hard or go home" hehehe I could never get used to sucking for air until the ramp timer expired so i turned it off. Also means i can take the mask off and everything shuts off with no issues, and re-starts if i have a power outage.

I have my Dreamstation set to start straight to set pressure, no ramp / no timer / no delay / no getting comfy and then taking a breath, just hit the button and straight in at set pressure.

"Go harder"  Grin
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#19
RE: Not getting enough air
(07-09-2018, 06:43 AM)Ockrocket Wrote: I have my Dreamstation set to start straight to set pressure, no ramp / no timer / no delay / no getting comfy and then taking a breath, just hit the button and straight in at set pressure.

"Go harder"  Grin

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#20
RE: Not getting enough air
(07-10-2018, 03:10 AM)matthewb Wrote:
(07-09-2018, 06:43 AM)Ockrocket Wrote: I have my Dreamstation set to start straight to set pressure, no ramp / no timer / no delay / no getting comfy and then taking a breath, just hit the button and straight in at set pressure.

"Go harder"  Grin

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Nothing like a bit of friendly 'Skippy vs Kiwi' rivalry siht stirring.  Laugh-a-lot

Cheers mate.  Coffee
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