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Operating Altitude Question
#1
While looking at the specs for different CPAP machines, I noted that some have an Operating Altitude of Seal Level to 8500'. I ski and routinely stay at resorts at 9000' or higher; what happens past 8500'? Is there anything that can be done to improve the performance at the higher altitudes?
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#2
(12-10-2012, 10:00 PM)aehjr Wrote: While looking at the specs for different CPAP machines, I noted that some have an Operating Altitude of Seal Level to 8500'. I ski and routinely stay at resorts at 9000' or higher; what happens past 8500'? Is there anything that can be done to improve the performance at the higher altitudes?

HI aehjr,

Below is a forum link where a similar situation was discussed. Maybe it will be helpful Smile

http://www.apneaboard.com/forums/Thread-...t=altitude
"Goodnight Chesty wherever you are!"
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#3
I don,t think makes much difference at 9000 ft but maybe at 12000 or higher might need to bump up pressure a bit to compensate
start with your normal set pressure and if AHI shows any significant jump, you can increase pressure by small increment
use SleepyHead to see whats going
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#4
(12-10-2012, 11:00 PM)pssnn Wrote: HI aehjr,

Below is a forum link where a similar situation was discussed. Maybe it will be helpful Smile

http://www.apneaboard.com/forums/Thread-...t=altitude

Thanks, pssnn.

And Semper fi.
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#5
My machine also gives an 8500 ft. statement. But I have had occasions to use my machine for a total of 7 or 8 weeks at altitudes of as much as 10,500 ft. and everything seemed to be OK- I slept well, awoke rested, and the machine ran smoothly each of the times that I spent a week at high elevation. I don't believe that there is any cause for concern.

I was much more aware of the elevation during the daytime hours when I was out and about in the mountains and got short of breath when I walked uphill.

TheDuke
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#6
That would be a good place for a pulse oximeter with SO2 Assistant software and data collected for Sleepyhead. You might be running into desaturation events though your BiPAP is running its heart out but not quite able to produce enough pressure at those altitudes. Some O2 to bleed into the system might be a good idea too.
Not medical oxygen though, aviation oxygen (it has a lower dewpoint and wont freeze in the regulator)
I am just guessing at this point though.
Are there any engineers in the house?

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#7
I wonder what the pressure is in airliner cabins when they zoom around at 20,000 meters.
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#8
(12-23-2012, 10:44 PM)JJJ Wrote: I wonder what the pressure is in airliner cabins when they zoom around at 20,000 meters.

From the World Health Organization:

Although aircraft cabins are pressurized, cabin air pressure at cruising altitude is lower than air pressure at sea level. At typical cruising altitudes in the range 11 000–12 200 m (36 000–40 000 feet), air pressure in the cabin is equivalent to the outside air pressure at 1800–2400 m (6000–8000 feet) above sea level.

This is just under the 8500 ft altitude recommendation from the manufacturer!
Sleepster
Apnea Board Moderator
www.ApneaBoard.com


INFORMATION ON APNEA BOARD FORUMS OR ON APNEABOARD.COM SHOULD NOT BE CONSIDERED AS MEDICAL ADVICE. ALWAYS SEEK THE ADVICE OF A PHYSICIAN BEFORE SEEKING TREATMENT FOR MEDICAL CONDITIONS, INCLUDING SLEEP APNEA. INFORMATION POSTED ON THE APNEA BOARD WEB SITE AND FORUMS ARE PERSONAL OPINION ONLY AND NOT NECESSARILY A STATEMENT OF FACT.
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#9
Maybe I am reading it wrong but it seems to contradict itself.

First: cabin air pressure at cruising altitude is lower than sea level
Second: at typical cruising altitudes, the pressure is equivalent to x ft above sea level

So which is it?
PaulaO2
Apnea Board Moderator
www.ApneaBoard.com


Breathe deeply and count to zen.

INFORMATION ON APNEA BOARD FORUMS OR ON APNEABOARD.COM SHOULD NOT BE CONSIDERED AS MEDICAL ADVICE. ALWAYS SEEK THE ADVICE OF A PHYSICIAN BEFORE SEEKING TREATMENT FOR MEDICAL CONDITIONS, INCLUDING SLEEP APNEA. INFORMATION POSTED ON THE APNEA BOARD WEB SITE AND FORUMS ARE PERSONAL OPINION ONLY AND NOT NECESSARILY A STATEMENT OF FACT.




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#10
(12-23-2012, 11:14 PM)PaulaO2 Wrote: Maybe I am reading it wrong but it seems to contradict itself.
First: cabin air pressure at cruising altitude is lower than sea level
Second: at typical cruising altitudes, the pressure is equivalent to x ft above sea level.
So which is it?

What Sleepster meant was that the higher you go above sea level, i.e., in a balloon without pressurization or in a car up a mountain, the lower the air pressure. So the air pressure in an airliner cabin at 40,000 feet is pressurized, but only to the equivalent of being at 8,000 feet without pressurization.
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