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Oxygen Level and Dr's Comments
#11
And it's good not to ignore srlevine1's points. In my case, a slow heart, not apnea is why my oxygen level is so low. There are a number of reasons why they haven't hooked me up to oxygen or given me a pacemaker yet. Both of these involve a lot more interventions and complications than you think. But, as I said, you should get a good explanation from the doc as to why this is appropriate for you and not this other path. Also, as mentioned, upload some graphs - people here can help you maximize your therapy often better than a doctor.
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#12
I should have stated that I tracked my SpO2 when on oxygen. I was warned about it's use. I only use oxygen now when the level drops. My oxygen use lately is zero. When needed I will use it again.
For more information explore and read the wiki or just start with the link below.
http://www.apneaboard.com/wiki/index.php...re_success

Just my personal opinion. My posts are not medical advice or a statement of fact. Please consult a qualified physician or other qualified medical personnel. Please comply with all applicable laws, codes, regulations, and protocols.
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#13
Thanks, all. Yes, the doc said that, other than for those 12 seconds, my O2 level was 88% or higher for the remainder of the night. And that 88% is fine. Just dunno why everything I've read seems to state that over 90% is fine??
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#14
(03-07-2017, 07:56 PM)harmon k Wrote: Thanks, all. Yes, the doc said that, other than for those 12 seconds, my O2 level was 88% or higher for the remainder of the night. And that 88% is fine. Just dunno why everything I've read seems to state that over 90% is fine??

The key to having peace of mind is being comfortable about what your physician is telling you -- and if this peace of mind is not present or you have lingering doubts, ask for a second opinion.

Personally, I am facing a procedure to correct a life-threatening arrhythmia. I have full confidence in the first doctor, but got a second opinion anyway since the procedure is not without risk. Both independently concur -- as does my cardiologist. I feel that I have done all I can and it is now in the hands of skilled people and a higher power.

Best of luck for a restful tonight for much better tomorrow.
"The object in life is not to be on the side of the majority, but to escape finding oneself in the ranks of the insane." -- Marcus Aurelius
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#15
(03-07-2017, 07:56 PM)harmon k Wrote: Thanks, all. Yes, the doc said that, other than for those 12 seconds, my O2 level was 88% or higher for the remainder of the night. And that 88% is fine. Just dunno why everything I've read seems to state that over 90% is fine??

First, bodies differ.  Second, the O2 level is measured indirectly and there is a built in erro rate.

A climber on Mt. Everest was filmed standing up and talking fairly rationally with a measured O2 level of 32%!  Of course he was a highly trained athlete I'm not and you probably aren't either.

90% is an accepted normal level.  Short dips below that are not unusual or necessarily of concern.  A long stay below 90% may be concerning.  Myself I was below 85% for more than half the night on CPAP alone, so O2 was prescribed and made a big difference.  During the day my O2 levels are fine without any supplemental oxygen.

Given what you are telling us, I don't see any need for concern and wouldn't worry about it.  As you get older that may change of course.
Ed Seedhouse
VA7SDH

Your brain is not the boss.

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#16
(03-07-2017, 10:42 PM)eseedhouse Wrote: A climber on Mt. Everest was filmed standing up and talking fairly rationally with a measured O2 level of 32%!  Of course he was a highly trained athlete I'm not and you probably aren't either. 

Did he have a smile on his face? It appears that many mountaineers routinely take VI*GRA to help them with their breathing.

Quote:German medical researchers reported that sildenafil (the generic name for Vi*gra) enabled 14 experienced Swiss and German climbers to better tolerate hypoxia, or lack of oxygen, while scaling the Himalayan peak. Hypoxia causes altitude sickness and hinders exercise by constricting lung blood vessels, as well as triggering other changes in the heart and lungs.

The drug is believed to be the first shown to increase exercise capacity during severe hypoxia at high altitudes. The researchers also found that it had a similar effect at sea level, where hypoxia-like conditions were induced on volunteers to produce an effect akin to what is experienced by patients suffering from lung disease or obstructions.
[Image: pixel.gif]
http://articles.latimes.com/2004/aug/30/...-everest30
"The object in life is not to be on the side of the majority, but to escape finding oneself in the ranks of the insane." -- Marcus Aurelius
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#17
Thanks. Asked my original sleep doc/pulmonologist about the "88% O2 readings with cpap. He said and that's perfectly fine and would consider any reading even over 85% to be ok.
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#18
(03-15-2017, 12:51 AM)harmon k Wrote: Thanks. Asked my original sleep doc/pulmonologist about the "88%  O2 readings with cpap. He said and  that's perfectly fine and would consider any reading even over 85% to be ok.

I'll bet he wouldn't say "Fine" if it was his oxy level at 86%...
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#19
88% SPO2 for 4 minutes is the level that my doc uses as starting oxygen.
For more information explore and read the wiki or just start with the link below.
http://www.apneaboard.com/wiki/index.php...re_success

Just my personal opinion. My posts are not medical advice or a statement of fact. Please consult a qualified physician or other qualified medical personnel. Please comply with all applicable laws, codes, regulations, and protocols.
Post Reply Post Reply


#20
(03-07-2017, 08:31 PM)srlevine1 Wrote:
(03-07-2017, 07:56 PM)harmon k Wrote: Thanks, all. Yes, the doc said that, other than for those 12 seconds, my O2 level was 88% or higher for the remainder of the night. And that 88% is fine. Just dunno why everything I've read seems to state that over 90% is fine??

The key to having peace of mind is being comfortable about what your physician is telling you -- and if this peace of mind is not present or you have lingering doubts, ask for a second opinion.

Personally, I am facing a procedure to correct a life-threatening arrhythmia. I have full confidence in the first doctor, but got a second opinion anyway since the procedure is not without risk. Both independently concur -- as does my cardiologist. I feel that I have done all I can and it is now in the hands of skilled people and a higher power.

Best of luck for a restful tonight for much better tomorrow.

Best of luck for your upcoming procedure. Prayers sent your way.
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