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Phillips AVAPS best machine?
#1
is the Phillips AVAPS the best machine out now better than the bipap auto sv? I'm still struggling with the bipap, I still damask when the pressure shoots up to 20 while the epap is going up
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#2
Physics, I moved your thread to the Main Forum area so it can get the attention it deserves.
PaulaO2
Apnea Board Moderator
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Breathe deeply and count to zen.

INFORMATION ON APNEA BOARD FORUMS OR ON APNEABOARD.COM SHOULD NOT BE CONSIDERED AS MEDICAL ADVICE. ALWAYS SEEK THE ADVICE OF A PHYSICIAN BEFORE SEEKING TREATMENT FOR MEDICAL CONDITIONS, INCLUDING SLEEP APNEA. INFORMATION POSTED ON THE APNEA BOARD WEB SITE AND FORUMS ARE PERSONAL OPINION ONLY AND NOT NECESSARILY A STATEMENT OF FACT.




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#3
It's not a better/worse thing.

AVAPS is optimized for a specific problem. (Hypoventilation, I think.)
ASV is optimized for central/mixed apnea.
BiPAP (bilevel) is needed by others.

You need the specific machine for your medical condition. I think AVAPS doesn't do ASV, and ASV doesn't do AVAPS. I don't even think ASV or AVAPS do "standard" bilevel.

It's a little different from CPAP/APAP. All APAPs can do standard CPAP, so the APAP machine is always "better," other than cost.
Get the free SleepyHead software here.
Useful links.
Click here for information on the main alternative to CPAP.
If it's midnight and a DME tells you it's dark outside, go and check it yourself.
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#4
(12-03-2013, 02:32 AM)archangle Wrote: AVAPS is optimized for a specific problem. (Hypoventilation, I think.)
ASV is optimized for central/mixed apnea.
BiPAP (bilevel) is needed by others.

You need the specific machine for your medical condition. I think AVAPS doesn't do ASV, and ASV doesn't do AVAPS. I don't even think ASV or AVAPS do "standard" bilevel.

Right.

I think an AVAP machine adjusts relatively slowly, perhaps a little bit after each breath or after several breaths, and might not adjust at all while the patient is in the middle of an apnea.

In contrast, an ASV machine can adjust extremely quickly, stepping in with a "backup rate" to maintain a normal breathing rate and prevent a potential apnea or hypopnea, perhaps adjusting from minimum PS (Pressure Support) to maximum PS in the time for one breath, stopping potential apneas within a second or two, long before they last 10 seconds and can officially be considered an "apnea". (As long as the Max IPAP and the Max PS are not set too low.)


Membership in the Advisory Member group should not be understood as in any way implying medical expertise or qualification for advising Sleep Apnea patients concerning their treatment. The Advisory Member group provides advice and suggestions to Apnea Board administrators and staff on matters concerning Apnea Board operation and administrative policies - not on matters concerning treatment for Sleep Apnea. I think it is now too late to change the name of the group but I think Voting Member group would perhaps have been a more descriptive name for the group.
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#5
yeah I have mixed. how about this nippy machine?
I tried the resmed s9 and it seemed too aggressive and there was no ramp so phillips works better except that on auto mode I get chest pains. so I think phillips is much better
on bpm 10, ti 1.0 and max ipap 18cm I had one night of great sleep with klonopin, but I can't get it to work even on that setting now. I'm so exhausted I fall asleep on the couch and suffer apneas all night now after years of this
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#6
Physicsstudent, you are making a simple mistake. When you achieve one night of success with your therapy you try to repeat it by setting the machine exactly as it was, or taking the same medicine you took that night.

You're assuming there's a cause-and-effect relationship there when in fact there is so much natural variation that it's not possible to do this based on just one night's data.

Wear the mask whenever you sleep, leave the settings on the machine alone and stop changing them.

Try listening to us, and if the advice we're giving you doesn't work for you, you're wasting your time when you look here for help.

Sleepster
Apnea Board Moderator
www.ApneaBoard.com


INFORMATION ON APNEA BOARD FORUMS OR ON APNEABOARD.COM SHOULD NOT BE CONSIDERED AS MEDICAL ADVICE. ALWAYS SEEK THE ADVICE OF A PHYSICIAN BEFORE SEEKING TREATMENT FOR MEDICAL CONDITIONS, INCLUDING SLEEP APNEA. INFORMATION POSTED ON THE APNEA BOARD WEB SITE AND FORUMS ARE PERSONAL OPINION ONLY AND NOT NECESSARILY A STATEMENT OF FACT.
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#7
the problem is there's a central, PLMD component to my sleep apnea and I need to take klonopin for the asv to work, without it I still feel foggy and nauseous and tired. but somehow I had a great night at these settings, I thought auto was better, but I woke up on BPM 10 feeling rested, kind of tired but like I had slept deeply

http://www.healthcare.philips.com/main/h...nology.wpd

anyway I seem to get a lot of hypopneas on sleepyhead but I have mixed apnea so I don't know if this is a better machine, it seems to be designed for COPD patients and people with low oxygen like me
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#8
(04-27-2014, 08:14 PM)physicsstudent13 Wrote: the problem is there's a central, PLMD component to my sleep apnea and I need to take klonopin for the asv to work, without it I still feel foggy and nauseous and tired.

Nope. That's not the reason.

The reason is because you don't use the machine when you're sleeping.

You have to use the machine every time you sleep, for every minute of time that you're sleeping. You'll still have days when you're foggy, nauseous, and tired. Those will never go away. But the cumulative effect of using your machine every time you sleep will be to reduce those symptoms, and reduce the number of days that you have those symptoms.

It takes a long time. Weeks or even months for some of us to gradually overcome those symptoms and start to have at least some days where we feel better. It's the cumulative effect of using the machine that brings the kind of long-lasting relief we seek. When you take klonopin and have a good day, it's just one day of goodness. When you use the CPAP machine religiously it's a lifetime of goodness.

If you keep doing what you've been doing you'll never get any better. You'll just have the occasional good day and be continuously seeking that magic bullet that'll make every day good. There's no magic bullet. There is only CPAP therapy.

Sleepster
Apnea Board Moderator
www.ApneaBoard.com


INFORMATION ON APNEA BOARD FORUMS OR ON APNEABOARD.COM SHOULD NOT BE CONSIDERED AS MEDICAL ADVICE. ALWAYS SEEK THE ADVICE OF A PHYSICIAN BEFORE SEEKING TREATMENT FOR MEDICAL CONDITIONS, INCLUDING SLEEP APNEA. INFORMATION POSTED ON THE APNEA BOARD WEB SITE AND FORUMS ARE PERSONAL OPINION ONLY AND NOT NECESSARILY A STATEMENT OF FACT.
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#9
(04-27-2014, 09:43 PM)Sleepster Wrote: Nope. That's not the reason.

The reason is because you don't use the machine when you're sleeping.

100% agree.


Quote: There's no magic bullet. There is only CPAP therapy.

Yep, true again. Use the machine all the time. Period. That's the way it's intended to be used.

oldman
SuperSleeper
Apnea Board Administrator
www.ApneaBoard.com


INFORMATION ON APNEA BOARD FORUMS OR ON APNEABOARD.COM SHOULD NOT BE CONSIDERED AS MEDICAL ADVICE. ALWAYS SEEK THE ADVICE OF A PHYSICIAN BEFORE SEEKING TREATMENT FOR MEDICAL CONDITIONS, INCLUDING SLEEP APNEA. INFORMATION POSTED ON THE APNEA BOARD WEB SITE AND FORUMS ARE PERSONAL OPINION ONLY AND NOT NECESSARILY A STATEMENT OF FACT.



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#10
By the way, while "chest pains" might sound rather ominous, if they feel like "muscle ache" rather than sharp pains, they are actually normal when getting used to CPAP therapy. Because of the increased pressure, your lungs have to do more work than they normally do, and just like your muscles getting sore after a workout, "muscle ache" in your lungs can be a temporary effect of using your machine. Another common effect along the same lines is a back ache right between the shoulder blades. They do go away eventually (mine took about a month or two) with consistent use of the CPAP therapy as your body gets used to it.
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