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[Product Review] Battery Powered!
#21
(03-06-2014, 11:40 AM)MAPnea Wrote: Hi, me50,

Thanks for your suggestion about contacting my power company to let them know I'm on a CPAP. That would work if I lived in "civilization", but I don't. Our power company is a rural co-op and during high wind activity and storms, our power frequently "goes out" for a few hours (or more). Two summers ago we lost power for three days thanks to a "wild fire" at one of our substations, sixty miles away.

I thought sleeping with a battery powered CPAP might be a good solution when storms were predicted for our area. Maybe I should just invest in a generator!
If I were you, I would invest in a small generator for those times you DO lose power for >2 days.

You're going to need it to charge that battery back up. How will you do so otherwise ?

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#22
I just did a presentation on disaster preparedness for a sleep apnea support group in AR.

One issue you need to look at is how long can you "survive" without heated humidification.

My suggestion is to try going with your humidifier heat turned off (with water in the chamber) AKA pass over humidification, and use nasal irrigation with something like Neil Med's prepackaged nasal irrigation sprays and see how things go.

For me I use CPAP in a semi truck where it's bone dry. My sinuses react badly after more than three days without good heated humidification (like an S9 with heated hose turned all the way up...lol)

If you can't survive for long without humidification look at a generator. Running heated humidification on batteries isn't realistic. (13 years of experience using CPAP in semi-trucks on battery).
If you can survive then its an issue of how you want to charge. Some of the smaller battery CPAP like Transcend don't take much to charge and have solar panel options. Charging a transcend battery from a car is realistic in a >2 day power failure.

In disaster situations bringing your cpap battery to a shelter during the day to charge would be an option. Special needs shelters will be ready to help CPAP users "shelter in place" rather than move into a disaster shelter. They should help you charge your CPAP batteries.

Hope this helps.

(Just a truck driver with sleep apnea )
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#23
(02-08-2015, 04:13 PM)truckerdad57 Wrote: I just did a presentation on disaster preparedness for a sleep apnea support group in AR.

One issue you need to look at is how long can you "survive" without heated humidification.

My suggestion is to try going with your humidifier heat turned off (with water in the chamber) AKA pass over humidification, and use nasal irrigation with something like Neil Med's prepackaged nasal irrigation sprays and see how things go.

For me I use CPAP in a semi truck where it's bone dry. My sinuses react badly after more than three days without good heated humidification (like an S9 with heated hose turned all the way up...lol)

If you can't survive for long without humidification look at a generator. Running heated humidification on batteries isn't realistic. (13 years of experience using CPAP in semi-trucks on battery).
If you can survive then its an issue of how you want to charge. Some of the smaller battery CPAP like Transcend don't take much to charge and have solar panel options. Charging a transcend battery from a car is realistic in a >2 day power failure.

In disaster situations bringing your cpap battery to a shelter during the day to charge would be an option. Special needs shelters will be ready to help CPAP users "shelter in place" rather than move into a disaster shelter. They should help you charge your CPAP batteries.

Hope this helps.


Honda makes a pretty much dead-silent generator that runs two nights on one gallon of gas.

[link removed] (Honda EU1000i)

It's very well regulated and makes electronics happy.

I have the 3000 watt model and it's been flawless for years.

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#24
(08-18-2014, 05:50 PM)snuffles Wrote: It's approx. 13 kilo, (29lbs) or 2 stone for those in the UK..

It's a Trojan..

(08-18-2014, 03:07 PM)PaulaO2 Wrote: What is the weight and size of the battery you got? Does it have a brand name?

A Trojan flooded SCS-150 100 amp-hour deep cycle marine battery weighs 50 pounds. That's fine as a yacht battery but I'd rather not have a flooded battery in my bedroom. A Trojan 27-AGM weighs 64 pounds. It would be challenging to find either one for less than $150.00. 100 amp-hour batteries are pretty expensive.
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