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Q: ResMed CPAP S9 AutoSet vs. VPAP ST ???
#1
Smile 
Hello, Smile

Wondering, in your opinion, which is a better machine (for more comfortable use) out of the...
- ResMed CPAP S9 AutoSet
and the
- ResMed VPAP ST (from S9 series)
???

Which would be more comfortable to wear?

If I have to chose out of Bipap and Auto-adjusting - which is better/more important??

Which is newer model?

Which is better overall?

Thank you
Thanks
Kind regards
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#2
I think the VPAP, the bilevel, is also an autoPAP. A machine can do both.

But bilevel and auto-adjusting are two different things and there is no "better overall".

Bilevel means the inhale to exhale pressure can be more than 3 points apart. Regular CPAPs can only be up to 3. Bilevel is typically used for folks who have lung issues or who otherwise need that extra gap between the two. This means that if the inhale--the treatment pressure--is set for 15, the exhale can 12 or less.

Auto-adjusting means the user can have a set range of treatment pressures and the machine adjusts within that range during the night as the user needs it. This can be more comfortable for many users.

So you can have one or both.
PaulaO2
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#3
VPAP makes the machine bi-level but not auto. To my knowledge all of the VPAPs are bilevel but only the machines with "auto" in the name are auto titrating.

Best Regards,

PaytonA
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#4
Hi dubli,
WELCOME! to the forum.!
Hang in there for more responses to your post and best of luck to you on your CPAP decision.
trish6hundred
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#5
(10-12-2014, 09:56 AM)dubli Wrote: Hello, Smile

Wondering, in your opinion, which is a better machine (for more comfortable use) out of the...
- ResMed CPAP S9 AutoSet
and the
- ResMed VPAP ST (from S9 series)
???

Which would be more comfortable to wear?

If I have to chose out of Bipap and Auto-adjusting - which is better/more important??

Which is newer model?

Which is better overall?

Thank you
Thanks
Kind regards

Have you had a sleep study? What type of apnea do you have?
You are putting the cart before the horse.

Which machine is best for you cannot be determined from the information given.
Are you working with a doctor?
INFORMATION ON APNEA BOARD FORUMS OR ON APNEABOARD.COM SHOULD NOT BE CONSIDERED AS MEDICAL ADVICE. ALWAYS SEEK THE ADVICE OF A PHYSICIAN BEFORE SEEKING TREATMENT FOR MEDICAL CONDITIONS, INCLUDING SLEEP APNEA. INFORMATION POSTED ON THE APNEA BOARD WEB SITE AND FORUMS ARE PERSONAL OPINION ONLY AND NOT NECESSARILY A STATEMENT OF FACT.
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#6
All depend on the diagnoses and what are you try to treat

CPAP/APAP works for the majority of people with just simple OSA diagnoses
Using more expensive and complex machine is like cracking walnut with a sledgehammer
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#7
I would say imho that I do not know as much as many of the people that have answered you here. Having said that I started with a straight cpap pressure of 18, and when I bought my own machine I bought a BiPAP Auto. It allows me to set as stated above not only the inhale but the exhale pressures as well. I do not understand why anyone would not want to have that ability as why would you want to breathe out (exhale) against 18 until you absolutely had to? And if you did the Auto would take you there. My current pressures are 13 EPAP and 16 IPAP with auto max at 20. That means for at least half the night (during exhalation) I am at 13, and then the other half the night is spent between 16 and 20 (during inhalation). For me personally this has made my personal therapy experience far better. But again, that is me, and my experience, and my personal opinion, the others have far more advanced knowledge than I do (again my opinion) as I am relatively new only less than a year for me.
If everyone thinks alike, then someone isn't thinking.
Everyone knows something, together we could know everything.
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#8
(10-12-2014, 04:28 PM)Galactus Wrote: Having said that I started with a straight cpap pressure of 18, and when I bought my own machine I bought a BiPAP Auto.
Based on American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM) titration protocol criteria, switch to bi-level if patient cannot tolerate pressure increase or pressure threshold of 15 cmH2O is reached


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#9
I agree that you should get the type of machine that fits your apnea. But sometimes there's more to it that might be good to think about.

For instance, my husband was diagnosed with OSA and given an APAP. Now, after 6 months of treatment in both CPAP and APAP modes, he has many more centrals than obstructives, and the centrals are difficult to control. So maybe he would have done better with a VPAP.

On the other hand, I have centrals and was given a VPAP. But I have difficulties in limiting the maximum pressure with this machine, so have difficulty with air swallowing. I would have liked a button for max inhalation pressure, but instead it's dependent upon exhalation pressure and pressure support (a somewhat convoluted arrangement).

I think there are ways to get around some of these issues with both machines, but no one really knows what will turn up once they start treatment. My advice is to clearly understand what your untreated apnea situation is so that you can be in on the selection of the machine. Try to determine if your doctor is informed enough to guide you. Use caution when starting with wide-open ranges, and narrow them when possible. Use the resources of this forum and continue to ask questions. You can probably count on some bumps in the road, but most will say (including me and my husband) that it's totally worth it to get your life back.
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#10
(10-12-2014, 04:51 PM)zonk Wrote:
(10-12-2014, 04:28 PM)Galactus Wrote: Having said that I started with a straight cpap pressure of 18, and when I bought my own machine I bought a BiPAP Auto.
Based on American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM) titration protocol criteria, switch to bi-level if patient cannot tolerate pressure increase or pressure threshold of 15 cmH2O is reached

I have two things to add to that;
1- Seems I know more than I thought.
2- Someone should tell that to my Dr and DME that gave me a brick.
If everyone thinks alike, then someone isn't thinking.
Everyone knows something, together we could know everything.
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