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Question about my sleep study results.. is my oxygen low?
#1
So I have had a couple sleep study tests done and both times they told me I did not have sleep apnea.  I went to see a TMJ doctor about something else and he started asking about sleep apnea and asked to have the sleep study results sent over.

So long story short, my number of "events" which I guess is what classifies a sleep apnea disorder is pretty low.  My average oxygen level is at 91.9% though and dipped to as low as 87%.  The TMJ doctor said this could have a lot to do with my headaches/fatigue/etc but I'd be paying out of pocket and it's pretty expensive.

Just wondering what you guys think about those numbers?
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#2
You might consider purchasing an inexpensive pulse oximeter which is data capable so you can upload the data to its software (in the case of many of the newer CMS models) and possibly to SleepyHead.
The CMS software will show you how much of the time you spend below a particular level, such 89%.
If you don't have apnea and you do have desaturations, you should consult a physician to determine what is causing them. It could be pulmonary, cardiac, or something else.
                                                                                                                                                                                  
Please organize your SleeyHead screenshots like this.
I'm an epidemiologist, not a medical provider. 
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#3
(03-27-2017, 09:24 PM)Beej Wrote: You might consider purchasing an inexpensive pulse oximeter which is data capable so you can upload the data to its software (in the case of many of the newer CMS models) and possibly to SleepyHead.
The CMS software will show you how much of the time you spend below a particular level, such 89%.
If you don't have apnea and you do have desaturations, you should consult a physician to determine what is causing them. It could be pulmonary, cardiac, or something else.

Thanks!  I shall buy one.

I have the numbers from my sleep study.

439 minutes were spent below 95%
20 minutes were spent below 90%
Average 91.9
Lowest 87.0

These numbers don't really mean much to me though.  Is this something I should be worried about or are those fairly standard?  Should I take these numbers to my PCP?  Thanks!

Edit* Oh and I had a max heart rate of 106.0 and the doctor also told me that was worrisome
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#4
Normal sleep O2 is between 90 and 92%. So you're doing good on that. What were the other events? Hypopnea and Apnea events?

You really didn't spend very long, in that one night, below "average" SpO2. Not enough to cause the symptoms your dentist is suggesting. If you do decide to invest in an oximeter, make sure it is one that records.
PaulaO2
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#5
(03-27-2017, 10:35 PM)PaulaO2 Wrote: Normal sleep O2 is between 90 and 92%. So you're doing good on that. What were the other events? Hypopnea and Apnea events?

You really didn't spend very long, in that one night, below "average" SpO2. Not enough to cause the symptoms your dentist is suggesting. If you do decide to invest in an oximeter, make sure it is one that records.

Hypopneas 3.3/hour 27 total events
O. apneas 1 event total
M. apneas 1 event total
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#6
my average is 95-96 while sleeping and I read 97 is ideal. I guess it depends on what you read, but I saw that "Any value of blood oxygen level below 92% is abnormal. However, the number of desaturations and the time spent with abnormal oxygen levels is important."
http://www.sleep-apnea-guide.com/sleep-a...level.html
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#7
Hi cokeguy223,
WELCOME! to the forum.!
Good luck to you with getting your health problems straightened out, hang in there for more responses to your post.
trish6hundred
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#8
Also note that the inexpensive pulse oximeters may be less precise than a sleep lab's machine. They are not intended to diagnose, but to provide some feedback. This is similar to home glucose testing - intended to give you some clues, but not as exact as lab tests.
                                                                                                                                                                                  
Please organize your SleeyHead screenshots like this.
I'm an epidemiologist, not a medical provider. 
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#9
Thanks guys. I bought an oximeter off Amazon to get a better idea of what it looks like. I'll update with some results after a few nights.
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