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Questions about stage 3/4 slow wave sleep
#1
Now that I've gotten more involved in my sleep therapy I just got copies of my original sleep study and titration done 10 years ago. (I was 62 at the time.) both studies showed:
Stage 1, approx 6%
Stage 2, 75-78%
Stage 3, 0%
Stage 4,  0%
REM 16-18%
AHI, 27.3, which I have now gotten down to an average of 1.7 for the last month thanks to the help from this forum.

From the little bit of research I have done it appears that lack of stage 3/4 slow wave sleep is a significant deficiency. Although I was seen by a sleep specialist, this was never discussed with me. Disappointing but not really surprising.

Of course that was 10 yrs ago and just a snapshot. Is it possible to determine stages of sleep from sleepyhead data?

Is this truly a cause for concern?

If so, what can be done to remedy it?

It seems I can't rely on my pulmonolgist, although I do intend to bring it up.

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#2
Lack of Stage 3 NREM and Stage 4 NREM sleep is a cause for concern but it is extremely likely that the awakenings caused by the sleep apnea were the reasons that you did not make it to stage 3 or 4 during your sleep test. Awakenings not being when you come fully awake, but when the adrenaline keeps you from slowing down to the next stage. Some untreated sleep apnea sufferers actually never make it out of Stage 1.

Your slow wave sleep is where most of the recuperative value of sleep actually exists. During slow wave sleep, your heart and a number of other organs relax and slow down to some extent. Having said that, a recording pulse-ox meter might show slow wave sleep by reduced pulse rates. I do not know of any reliable way of identifying stage 3 or 4 sleep from the data collected from your CPAP. I have heard some local theories and maybe they hold true in some individual cases but nothing that I would hang my hat on.

Best Regards,

PaytonA
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#3
I've really been misinformed. I've thought for years that the recuperative value of sleep occurred in REM. Thanks for the response.

Hopefully, now that I've got my AHI well below 1.7 most of the time, I am getting some SW sleep.

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#4
(03-13-2017, 06:22 PM)Melman Wrote: I've really been misinformed. I've thought for years that the recuperative value of sleep occurred in REM. Thanks for the response.

Hopefully, now that I've got my AHI well below 1.7 most of the time, I am getting some SW sleep.

The information that I gave you is from Barry Krakow MD, Head of the sleep center at University of New Mexico. I would think that now you are getting significantly more SW sleep.

Best Regards,

Paytona
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#5
Melman, I don't think you're alone with the lack of Delta sleep. Here is a thread from a few weeks back when I was wondering the same thing. Like you I was always under the impression that REM was the sleep we all longed for. Turns out it is actually Delta sleep that provides the most benefit to the body. Who knew?

Oh-jeez

http://www.apneaboard.com/forums/Thread-...elta-Sleep
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#6
(03-14-2017, 01:28 PM)Cranberry Ray Wrote: Melman, I don't think you're alone with the lack of Delta sleep. Here is a thread from a few weeks back when I was wondering the same thing. Like you I was always under the impression that REM was the sleep we all longed for. Turns out it is actually Delta sleep that provides the most benefit to the body. Who knew?

Oh-jeez

http://www.apneaboard.com/forums/Thread-...elta-Sleep

Thanks for the link. My sleep study results were almost identical to yours but my report dis no include the statement; The sleep architecture was abnormal
with the absence of delta sleep.

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#7
I've been classified as "abnormal" for many things in life so I took the sleep architecture comment in stride.

Crazy
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#8
Mt sleep study was virtually identical, I am waiting the results of my titration so I can attempt to remedy the situation. But I have found my sleep to be non-restful and non-restorative for many years now.
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#9
TASmart, welcome to the Wonderful World of CPAP's. You have found an incredible resource to help you with your journey. You will soon realize that most in the medical profession is not nearly as knowledgeable on fine tuning your treatment for the best results as are the folks on the ApneaBoard. Please keep us posted on your progress and don't ever hesitate to ask questions. Good luck!

Welcome
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#10
Great post. I went back and looked at my sleep study and learned something new.

I had a sleep efficiency of 97.8%

I had 1.8% of my sleep in slow wave. No wonder I never feel rested.
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