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Resmed S10 Airsense vs. Respironics Dream Station
What's the best way to know you ratio of how much you use your machine to get covered by insurance? Insurance says you need to use the machine 70% of the time. I just went back to my sleep study clinic for a follow-up after 2 months of use, and they told me i'm at 40%, and need to use it more, or wear it during the day while working to boost my numbers. How the heck do I know when I'm near this 70% that insurance companies follow?
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They look for a minimum of 4 hours use a night for a 30 day period within the first 90 days use.

My question would be...why are you not using the APAP more? If you are having any other issues, please ask so that we can help. Smile
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(12-28-2015, 01:11 PM)Jackie1 Wrote: What's the best way to know you ratio of how much you use your machine to get covered by insurance? Insurance says you need to use the machine 70% of the time. I just went back to my sleep study clinic for a follow-up after 2 months of use, and they told me i'm at 40%, and need to use it more, or wear it during the day while working to boost my numbers. How the heck do I know when I'm near this 70% that insurance companies follow?

Your profile shows you're using SleepyHead. Look on the Statistics page second line under "Detail", with the heading labeled "Compliance".
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(12-28-2015, 01:11 PM)Jackie1 Wrote: What's the best way to know you ratio of how much you use your machine to get covered by insurance? Insurance says you need to use the machine 70% of the time. I just went back to my sleep study clinic for a follow-up after 2 months of use, and they told me i'm at 40%, and need to use it more, or wear it during the day while working to boost my numbers. How the heck do I know when I'm near this 70% that insurance companies follow?

Jackie, you should start your own thread to discuss your compliance problems. Your Resmed Airsense 10 Autoset reports compliance remotely to the DME who can read it using AirView. You could read it if you download and install ResScan or Sleepyhead. I believe it is available to you on your machine display under Sleep Report. It will tell you the days used, days with 4+ hours, average hours and total use hours. You are in compliance if you use the machine more than 4-hours on at least 21 of 30 days. Any less, and you are not in compliance for CPAP use.
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(12-28-2015, 01:16 PM)OpalRose Wrote: They look for a minimum of 4 hours use a night for a 30 day period within the first 90 days use.

My question would be...why are you not using the APAP more? If you are having any other issues, please ask so that we can help. Smile

Well, we should start another thread, but let's correct this. You forgot the 70% part.

Medicare says "use of PAP devices for 4 or more hours per night on 70% of nights during a
consecutive 30-day period anytime during the first 3 months of initial use"

https://www.cms.gov/Outreach-and-Educati...905064.pdf

Most insurance companies use a similar requirement, but it may vary, especially in terms of whether you have 3 months or not. The DME's, doctors, therapists, and insurance reps often get the details wrong.

In theory, a "night" is noon to noon, but they often get that wrong, too, especially in terms of the clock, time zone, etc. not being set right.
Get the free SleepyHead software here.
Useful links.
Click here for information on the main alternative to CPAP.
If it's midnight and a DME tells you it's dark outside, go and check it yourself.
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(12-28-2015, 06:53 AM)Weird Tolkienish Figure Wrote: I am seriously considering going into the clinicians settings and upping my min pressure to 6 or 7. Is this a bad idea?

My AHI seems to hover around 10 and from what I've read having a low minimum pressure can cause this? Also I get the smothering feeling when I first start the machine, which subsides.

IMHO I don't think it's a bad idea at all. In fact, it might be a good idea to up it to 8.

What is your 95 pressure reported in Sleepyhead?
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(12-31-2015, 08:33 PM)nelamvr6 Wrote:
(12-28-2015, 06:53 AM)Weird Tolkienish Figure Wrote: I am seriously considering going into the clinicians settings and upping my min pressure to 6 or 7. Is this a bad idea?

My AHI seems to hover around 10 and from what I've read having a low minimum pressure can cause this? Also I get the smothering feeling when I first start the machine, which subsides.

IMHO I don't think it's a bad idea at all. In fact, it might be a good idea to up it to 8.

What is your 95 pressure reported in Sleepyhead?

I don't have SH available for my machine but it hovers around 16.
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(01-04-2016, 04:24 PM)Weird Tolkienish Figure Wrote: I don't have SH available for my machine but it hovers around 16.

Hi Tolkienish,

If your average pressure is around 16, I suggest gradually working your start pressure up to 10, and your Min Pressure somewhat higher than that, like between 2 to 4 lower than your 90% pressure. This would be so your machine would not start so far below the pressure you need.

On the other hand, OSA is usually strongly positional, with flat on our back (supine) usually being the very worst sleep position. If you can take precautions to ensure you will never be rolling onto your back while asleep, you may find you need much less pressure.

Many of us have found that we need to take precautions to assure we will not roll over onto our back (and remain in that position) while asleep. Some of us wear a snug teeshirt with a couple tennis balls in pockets or socks sewn along the spine between the shoulder blades and higher. Others wear a light knapsack with something in it light but bulky like some tubes of tennis balls, to assure they don't roll onto their back while asleep. Others use super long "body pillows" under the sheet to help control sleep position. Others find they they cannot sleep on their side and must sleep on their back but find it helps greatly to sleep in a comfortable reclining chair so the spine and neck are aligned but elevated.

Available by prescription is a new positional sensor device called Night Shift Sleep Positioner http://www.advancedbrainmonitoring.com/sleep-medicine which is a vibro-tactile device worn on the back of the neck, which vibrates progressively more strongly to alert us when we are in the supine position, to gently arouse us enough for us to change position and quickly fall asleep again. This can be used along with a CPAP machine, or, if our OSA is mild enough, might be sufficient on its own to train us to avoid the supine position and achieve restful sleep.

Take care,
--- Vaughn
Membership in the Advisory Member group should not be understood as in any way implying medical expertise or qualification for advising Sleep Apnea patients concerning their treatment. The Advisory Member group provides advice and suggestions to Apnea Board administrators and staff on matters concerning Apnea Board operation and administrative policies - not on matters concerning treatment for Sleep Apnea. I think it is now too late to change the name of the group but I think Voting Member group would perhaps have been a more descriptive name for the group.
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Howdy all, first time poster here. I'm a little bummed this thread didn't stay on topic, because the subject line is exactly what I was looking for. So here's my story. I resisted getting on apnea therapy for a long time because I just thought it would really suck. I tried many other avenues including a custom mouth guard and sinus surgery. Now I wish I had just gone this route from the get-go. So I got my Dreamstation Auto this past x-mas eve...I'm now on my third one and looking to replace it with an Airsense 10. My DME provider has been great and has replaced it twice under warranty. But with this third one exhibiting the same problem, I've had enough. It's been truly frustrating. When it's working correctly, it's awesome...purrs like a kitten and you barely know it's in the room. But when it malfunctions, you know it immediately. The compressor randomly just starts spazzing out. You can hear it, you can feel it. It goes fast, slow, fast, slow, etc, etc. It's bizarre because the machine will work perfectly for somewhere from ten days to two weeks. Then one night you'll get in bed, put on your mask, flip it on, and it just goes crazy. You know it within seconds. To make it even more bizarre, if I have my DME or my doctor send a new command to the machine, it will start working correctly again...for about ten days, then you're right back where you were. So now the third machine is doing the same thing. Three strikes, it's out! I see my doctor next week and I think I'm going to press him to change my order to an Airsense. Was curious if anyone had personally tried both machines. After next week, I may be that guy. I got acclimated to the therapy fairly quickly I think. First couple of nights were tough, but like I said, I think I acclimated quickly. I had my doc tweak my pressure settings a few times and feel pretty good now at about 9-9.5cm. Now I just need a machine that will deliver that consistently night after night. For me, the Dreamstation is not that machine. Pity, because it seems like a pretty sweet piece of equipment, but I'm convinced they have some software issues. My provider says he's had other similar complaints with this machine, but Respironics disavowed any knowledge of any such problems. Whatever. Anyway, I'd be interested to hear if anyone else here has had similar experience with a new Dreamstation. My DME pinged my machine today, so hopefully it will be good until I can see my doc next week.
Later,
Daver
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(05-05-2016, 08:06 PM)Dangerous Dave Wrote: Howdy all, first time poster here. I'm a little bummed this thread didn't stay on topic, because the subject line is exactly what I was looking for. So here's my story. I resisted getting on apnea therapy for a long time because I just thought it would really suck. I tried many other avenues including a custom mouth guard and sinus surgery. Now I wish I had just gone this route from the get-go. So I got my Dreamstation Auto this past x-mas eve...I'm now on my third one and looking to replace it with an Airsense 10. My DME provider has been great and has replaced it twice under warranty. But with this third one exhibiting the same problem, I've had enough. It's been truly frustrating. When it's working correctly, it's awesome...purrs like a kitten and you barely know it's in the room. But when it malfunctions, you know it immediately. The compressor randomly just starts spazzing out. You can hear it, you can feel it. It goes fast, slow, fast, slow, etc, etc. It's bizarre because the machine will work perfectly for somewhere from ten days to two weeks. Then one night you'll get in bed, put on your mask, flip it on, and it just goes crazy. You know it within seconds. To make it even more bizarre, if I have my DME or my doctor send a new command to the machine, it will start working correctly again...for about ten days, then you're right back where you were. So now the third machine is doing the same thing. Three strikes, it's out! I see my doctor next week and I think I'm going to press him to change my order to an Airsense. Was curious if anyone had personally tried both machines. After next week, I may be that guy. I got acclimated to the therapy fairly quickly I think. First couple of nights were tough, but like I said, I think I acclimated quickly. I had my doc tweak my pressure settings a few times and feel pretty good now at about 9-9.5cm. Now I just need a machine that will deliver that consistently night after night. For me, the Dreamstation is not that machine. Pity, because it seems like a pretty sweet piece of equipment, but I'm convinced they have some software issues. My provider says he's had other similar complaints with this machine, but Respironics disavowed any knowledge of any such problems. Whatever. Anyway, I'd be interested to hear if anyone else here has had similar experience with a new Dreamstation. My DME pinged my machine today, so hopefully it will be good until I can see my doc next week.
Later,
Daver

I love my Dream station. I use it as much as possible, I think I average about 5 hours a night on it, many nights I get over 7 hours with it. The machine came with a 5 year warranty. No problems here, hope I don't get any.
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