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Reuse of needles w insulin pens
#11
I still have 4 boxes of generic lancets from Walgreens and Wal-Mart. They fit in both styles of Bayer Contour lancet devices (the pen and the short stubby one). The funny thing about it was they didn't work in the newer pens from either Walgreens or Relion. I'm terrible about replacing the lancets, but now I put in a new one every day.
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#12
I use BD Ultra-Fine Nano needles for both my insulin and Victoza; they are 4mm x 32G. I'm pretty sure the hair on my head is thicker than these needles.
As for lancets, I re-use them until I start feeling pain - usually for about a month. But then again I'm not very good at taking my blood more than twice a day.

Since we are on this subject, I'd like to point out my experiences with a couple of the testing equipment. I started out using a Freestyle meter and lancet device; this meter requires a small droplet of blood. About a year ago, I switched to an Accu-chek device because I liked the idea that the meter stored the new test strips internally. Boy, what a mistake that was; this new device requires about twice as much blood as my old meter! I recently told my endo that I'd continue to use the newer device until I'd used up my supply of test strips but then I was going back to a Freestyle machine. Hearing that she gave two new Freestyle meters and a promise to prescribe the test strips when I needed them.
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#13
Lancet size does not depend much on the meter you use - so long as you can squeeze enough blood to cover the strip head, that is all that counts, and of course, you all know to use not the first drop but the second drop after wiping away the first drop, I am sure, so the lancet must penetrate the skin surface enough that you can get two drops out of it (squeeze, of course) and still allow the skin to seal almost immediately after.
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#14
(06-20-2015, 04:29 AM)DocWils Wrote: Lancet size does not depend much on the meter you use - so long as you can squeeze enough blood to cover the strip head, that is all that counts, and of course, you all know to use not the first drop but the second drop after wiping away the first drop, I am sure, so the lancet must penetrate the skin surface enough that you can get two drops out of it (squeeze, of course) and still allow the skin to seal almost immediately after.

that is good information to know. I sure didn't know that and if my teenager coming to visit doesn't know, I will sure share this information. Thanks.
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#15
I've been using the BD 30g Ultra Fine lancets. I put a fresh one in every morning; and I clean the lancing shield with alcohol.
I started this thread about needles for pens as my doc gave me some pens.
Normally, I use syringe and vial. The syringes I use are 30g x 12.7mm and 1 ml capacity. I reuse them for a day... I'd use a new one every time if they would charge a decent price for them. My insurance does not pay for them.

Everything costs double what it cost only a few years ago -- but, "we have no inflation." Our money is just as worthless as a Mark in the Wiemar Republic. Can you change a $100,000 Bill?
[Image: 100k%20Mark%20Front.jpeg]

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#16
Used to have one of those when I was a child - no, I tell a lie, it was a million mark note, good for a litre of milk and some bread. I wonder whatever happened to it, or the rest of my coin collection, for that matter?

For syringes, the answer is clear, new one each time unless otherwise indicated, for pens, it is recommended to change the needle each time, but there are those who manage a few uses per needle. Note that the needle on the pen is designed for single use, so if you do manage two or three uses before it dulls or breaks off in your skin, you are lucky. About the price I can only sympathise - everything is more expensive, and medical supplies are massively more expensive now than twenty years ago. I went to buy some Fixomul Stretch and a gift of a fully loaded up doctor's bag (the latter for a graduating student that I am fond of) and nearly fainted at the price of both - my first bag, fully loaded, cost me around SFR 30, a replacement bag, fully loaded, I bought more or less halfway through my career was SFR 50, now the same bag with the same basic supplies costs almost SFR 500, the Fixomul Stretch tape that I like to use daily was SFR 2.80 a roll only three years ago, the last time I bulk bought for me, now it is SFR14.80 for the same size roll. So I do get where you are coming from. If it is any comfort, our hospital is drowning under the massive increase in costs for disposables and it is constantly pushing up the basic rate of insurance and forcing clinics to cut services.
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#17
(06-20-2015, 04:29 AM)DocWils Wrote: you all know to use not the first drop but the second drop after wiping away the first drop, I am sure, so the lancet must penetrate the skin surface enough that you can get two drops out of it (squeeze, of course) and still allow the skin to seal almost immediately after.

I gave never been told this by any doctor or diabetes educator.
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#18
Depends on who you ask. Some say it matters, some say not. Some say don't squeeze but stroke the finger, some say squeeze.

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#19
(06-19-2015, 10:26 PM)PollCat Wrote: I use BD Ultra-Fine Nano needles for both my insulin and Victoza; they are 4mm x 32G. I'm pretty sure the hair on my head is thicker than these needles.
As for lancets, I re-use them until I start feeling pain - usually for about a month. But then again I'm not very good at taking my blood more than twice a day.

Since we are on this subject, I'd like to point out my experiences with a couple of the testing equipment. I started out using a Freestyle meter and lancet device; this meter requires a small droplet of blood. About a year ago, I switched to an Accu-chek device because I liked the idea that the meter stored the new test strips internally. Boy, what a mistake that was; this new device requires about twice as much blood as my old meter! I recently told my endo that I'd continue to use the newer device until I'd used up my supply of test strips but then I was going back to a Freestyle machine. Hearing that she gave two new Freestyle meters and a promise to prescribe the test strips when I needed them.

what is a freestyle meter and how is it different than the one you use now other than you only need a minute drop of blood with the freestyle meter?
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#20
(06-20-2015, 10:32 PM)PollCat Wrote:
(06-20-2015, 04:29 AM)DocWils Wrote: you all know to use not the first drop but the second drop after wiping away the first drop, I am sure, so the lancet must penetrate the skin surface enough that you can get two drops out of it (squeeze, of course) and still allow the skin to seal almost immediately after.

I gave never been told this by any doctor or diabetes educator.

This is how we were taught and is standard practice here. Can't say for the US.
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