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S9 ClimateControl - what do you give up in 'manual' mode?
#1
I'm not sure how many folks here are using the climate control feature (heated humidifer + heated hose) on the S9, but I could use a little help understand the manual mode.

From reading the clinician manual, I understand that when the ClimateControl mode is 'auto', the machine lets you specify a minimum air temperature and the machine will auto-adjust the humidity level throughout the night so that it keeps a constant 80% relative humidity at the specified temperature to prevent rainout. All fine and good. This is actually the mode I've been using so far. However, I think I'd like to try for some more humidity. Cue manual mode...

Now, when ClimateControl is set to 'manual', my understanding goes out the window. In this mode, the thermostat and humidity level controls are broken out separately. Temperature is the same; still makes perfect sense. Humidity though, is just a vague value ranging from "Off" to "6.0" in 0.5 increments. My gut feeling is that you're supposed to just set the humidity to whatever feels right, but then rainout becomes a concern.

Is it correct that manual mode forfeits rainout protection? Are you supposed to figure out an appropriate hose temperature to prevent rainout, and if so, what's the trick to doing that?

Is there a way to avoid all this voodoo and just instruct the S9 to adjust for a higher humidity level in 'auto' mode (without increasing the temperature too much)?

As always,
Thanks!
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#2
(07-02-2013, 05:32 PM)Paptillian Wrote: Is it correct that manual mode forfeits rainout protection? Are you supposed to figure out an appropriate hose temperature to prevent rainout, and if so, what's the trick to doing that?

The hose temp. doesn't really heat the air enough to notice (just consider the volume of air moving through it). It mostly just heats the wall of the tube to prevent condensation on the inner wall of the tube. I set my hose temp. to 86degF and humidity level to 5.5 or 6 and have never had rainout (running out of water is another issue entirely). If you are really set on keeping the hose temp to a minimum, then I think the only way to find out how high you can go with the humidity setting is by trial and error. It will have a lot to do with the ambient air temp in the room and the relative humidity of the air coming into the PAP.

Quote:Is there a way to avoid all this voodoo and just instruct the S9 to adjust for a higher humidity level in 'auto' mode (without increasing the temperature too much)?

Raising the hose temp is the only way to increase humidity in Auto mode; but, why not try it? Like I said, I don't think the higher hose temp makes a noticeable difference in the temp of the air coming out.

Sleep-well

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#3
(07-02-2013, 06:11 PM)jgjones1972 Wrote: It mostly just heats the wall of the tube to prevent condensation on the inner wall of the tube.

Hmm, perhaps you're right (it makes sense) but I swear I can tell the difference between 78F and 80F. I even tried 76F a couple nights and decided that 78 was the sweet spot. So, as far as I could tell, there was a definite difference just between 2 degrees.

Maybe I'm over-thinking it and it's just a placebo effect. I was scared to try anything over 80 but maybe I'll give it a shot.

So as far as controlling rainout in manual mode, setting your hose at the max. temp seems to do the trick year-round?
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#4
My climate control set on auto @ 27C
If air feel warm reach the dial (in my sleep) and turn toward the wall for down and if air feel cold turn the dial the other way for up

ClimateLine user instruction http://www.resmed.com/au/assets/document...lo_eng.pdf
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#5
(07-02-2013, 10:04 PM)Paptillian Wrote: Hmm, perhaps you're right (it makes sense) but I swear I can tell the difference between 78F and 80F. I even tried 76F a couple nights and decided that 78 was the sweet spot. So, as far as I could tell, there was a definite difference just between 2 degrees.

If you were in Auto mode, then raising the hose temp also raised the temp of the warming plate in the humidifier - along with the water in there. So it makes sense you would be more likely to notice the difference. Raising the hose temp in manual will not raise the temp of the humidifier plate or the water - you have to control that with the humidity setting.

Quote:So as far as controlling rainout in manual mode, setting your hose at the max. temp seems to do the trick year-round?

Yes, I've never had rain out and if I'm only going to sleep for 6 hours or so I set humidity to 6. Factor in that I also like to keep the room at about 65degF (helps me sleep) and I would say that setting the hose at 86degF will prevent rainout in most circumstances.

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#6
Thanks for the advice. I tried 82F last night (on auto) and it seemed okay, so I'll keep going and see what feels best. I noticed my lower lip is bleeding today, but I think it's related to a mask issue I've been having the last few days. Will post about it separately.
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