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Should I bring CPAC to minor surgery
#11
When I had day surgery, been told to bring CPAP with me, just in case or if had to stay overnight for some reason
Its always better to have it and don't need it, than not to have it and need it ... something like that
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#12
I didnt take mine once, wound up using a new mask supplied by the hospital and one of their cpaps.
Now i always take mine, even for "in out same day" cuz never works out that way.
I take the humidifier too.
The hospital will supply sterile water for your humidifier.
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#13
always take the machine - even on same day surgery.
- and show the anesthesiologist how to turn it on. As one said to me, "I don't want to have to figure it out if I need it in recovery, and thanked me for bringing it."
- you might have to stay overnight. You do not want the hospital's equipment because even with the "same setting" they are not, and it will be uncomfortable (rise rates, epr, trigger algorithms, etc.) and might not get the order written in time for bedtime.
- you are the first one operated on in the AM and out of surgery and awake and resting by 9:30 AM. Staying over or not, you won't see repertory (separate department from anesthesia) until early evening and you are probably going to want to take a snooze.
- they will water the humidifier - take it.
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#14
Here is a no vote. Prior to your minor surgery you will briefly meet with the doctor, anesthesiologist and nurses. They will ask about your health history and sleep apnea, and will be prepared to administer oxygen and meet your respiratory needs according to the level and type of anesthesia administered. Following minor surgery you will awaken relatively quickly and won't have a need for CPAP. Even if you have some apnea, it will help you to awaken and move towards discharge. In the unlikely event you have respiratory distress your needs will be met.

When you disclose your sleep apnea, the anesthesiologist may decide to use lighter anesthesia, or ensure you are sufficiently stable to release to recovery. My experience with colonoscopy, cataract surgery and other minor out-patient procedures is that CPAP is not useful or necessary. If you are to be admitted to the hospital, or will spend a night, then that is entirely a different story. If you are concerned about the potential need, then pack the CPAP in the car and have it available through the person accompanying you; but I would not ordinarily take it in for this kind of procedure.
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#15
I just wanted to add, that the last thing you are supposed to do in recovery is sleep. Your job there is to wake up and get out. Most out-patient recovery areas will discourage the use of CPAP.
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#16
When I had a colonoscopy and they found out that I had sleep apnea, my wife had to return home to retrieve it since they put me under deep sedation.
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#17
Take it. Yes, the idea is to wake up and go but there is a lot of snoozing in the meantime. And a lot of snoring that is disturbing not only the other patients but the staff.

It will help the various medication to work better. It will help the oxygen to work better. It will help you to sleep better and wake up better. They may choose to use it during the surgery itself if you are not intubated.
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#18
I had minor foot surgery in 2015 and made sure my anesthesiologist was aware of my severe OSA. He did ask if I had brought my machine (I hadn't). Worse case they would intubate. I had no issues. Doing a replay on the other foot in a couple of months. My machine will be going with me so the anesthesiologist can use it if need be. I'll have my basis covered. Better than a tube stuck down my airway :-)

The critical thing is you make your anesthesiologist aware of your Sleep Apnea.
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