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Sleep Apnea and Service Dogs
#11
The VA is helping a lot of vets to get service dogs but they're being weird about it. What, the VA weird? Say it ain't so!

You can train your own, find someone to help you train, or get on a list for one. There's a lot of organizations around now for that. Some of them charge a HUGE price for them (I've seen some charge over $10K) but many that do also help you with fundraising. Personally, I'd rather train my own. It's not as difficult as it sounds.

Oh, a book for you to get is called Teamwork 1 and Teamwork 2. You can find them at the Dogwise website. The first one is to help a PWD train a dog and the second is how to train a SD. Excellent starting points.

As for the sleep apnea, if you do certain things when you stop breathing, you can train the dog to recognize them. But if you don't then there's nothing to train. Since central apnea doesn't have many signs other than the chest not rising, it would be a challenge.
PaulaO2
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Breathe deeply and count to zen.

INFORMATION ON APNEA BOARD FORUMS OR ON APNEABOARD.COM SHOULD NOT BE CONSIDERED AS MEDICAL ADVICE. ALWAYS SEEK THE ADVICE OF A PHYSICIAN BEFORE SEEKING TREATMENT FOR MEDICAL CONDITIONS, INCLUDING SLEEP APNEA. INFORMATION POSTED ON THE APNEA BOARD WEB SITE AND FORUMS ARE PERSONAL OPINION ONLY AND NOT NECESSARILY A STATEMENT OF FACT.




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#12
(07-17-2013, 07:22 PM)PaulaO2 Wrote: As for the sleep apnea, if you do certain things when you stop breathing, you can train the dog to recognize them. But if you don't then there's nothing to train. Since central apnea doesn't have many signs other than the chest not rising, it would be a challenge.

Don't be too sure. Some dogs can tell when someone's about to have a seizure or if a diabetic's blood sugar is going low. It's usually assumed the dog is smelling something, but they're not sure.

I think dogs may simply be psychic. My dog can be 20 feet away, out of sight, but she can tell when I look at the bag with the doggie treats before I touch it.

Get the free SleepyHead software here.
Useful links.
Click here for information on the main alternative to CPAP.
If it's midnight and a DME tells you it's dark outside, go and check it yourself.
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#13
Paula02,
I appreciated your humor. I laughed out loud when I read your post.

There might be something to training dogs to recognize certain sleep behaviors such as snoring but I think it would be tougher to train than other behaviors because it would be difficult to continually reinforce the dog's actions if you're sleeping. (hope this makes sense)

Dogs are amazing at sensing things that are wrong with their owners. I have read and seen TV broadcasts about regular dogs as pets being able to identify where cancers are in their owners, saving home owners from fires that didn't start until after the owners were up and out of the house, identifying oncoming epilepsy attacks, etc. Obviously your Mike sensed something was wrong, woke you up and then stayed close enough to you in case he needed to help you again.
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#14
Of course, sometimes they're wrong too.

Every so often, mine comes over to me, gives me this very concerned look like something horrible is about to happen, but I can't find anything wrong and nothing happens.

It's sort of like the wolf who cried "boy."
Get the free SleepyHead software here.
Useful links.
Click here for information on the main alternative to CPAP.
If it's midnight and a DME tells you it's dark outside, go and check it yourself.
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#15
(07-18-2013, 12:21 AM)archangle Wrote:
(07-17-2013, 07:22 PM)PaulaO2 Wrote: As for the sleep apnea, if you do certain things when you stop breathing, you can train the dog to recognize them. But if you don't then there's nothing to train. Since central apnea doesn't have many signs other than the chest not rising, it would be a challenge.

Don't be too sure. Some dogs can tell when someone's about to have a seizure or if a diabetic's blood sugar is going low. It's usually assumed the dog is smelling something, but they're not sure.

True. It would be interesting to find out what possible triggers there are with CSA that could be used in training. With diabetes, they train the dog with scent. Cotton balls rubbed on temples or Q-tip inside the cheek during a blood sugar drop. Seizures they aren't sure what it is. Someone else would have to be with you while you napped then train the dog to react to the situation.

Quote:I think dogs may simply be psychic. My dog can be 20 feet away, out of sight, but she can tell when I look at the bag with the doggie treats before I touch it.

I can pick up a banana and start to open it. Mike is here in a heartbeat, like he teleported from wherever he was.
PaulaO2
Apnea Board Moderator
www.ApneaBoard.com


Breathe deeply and count to zen.

INFORMATION ON APNEA BOARD FORUMS OR ON APNEABOARD.COM SHOULD NOT BE CONSIDERED AS MEDICAL ADVICE. ALWAYS SEEK THE ADVICE OF A PHYSICIAN BEFORE SEEKING TREATMENT FOR MEDICAL CONDITIONS, INCLUDING SLEEP APNEA. INFORMATION POSTED ON THE APNEA BOARD WEB SITE AND FORUMS ARE PERSONAL OPINION ONLY AND NOT NECESSARILY A STATEMENT OF FACT.




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#16
When I see some of the TV shows about dogs that can sense things, I keep thinking that there could be some sort of mass screening. You walk by a long line of dogs, each of which is trained for a different medical condition. If the dog alerts, you're given a slip of paper with a number. At the end of the line, you turn in the slips of paper and have a list of medical conditions to check on.

You'd probably need to do the same thing with some bodily fluid samples as well.

It would be a really interesting experiment to try.

"Well, sir, Skippy says you may have bladder cancer, Goldie says you may be diabetic, Spot says you need your vitamin D checked, Maude says you're an a**hole, Fernando thinks you look marvelous."
Get the free SleepyHead software here.
Useful links.
Click here for information on the main alternative to CPAP.
If it's midnight and a DME tells you it's dark outside, go and check it yourself.
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#17
(07-17-2013, 12:34 PM)PaulaO2 Wrote: Service dogs help a single individual with a disability by doing one or more trained tasks. There's a lot of different "kinds" ranging from seizure alert to guide dogs.

Therapy dogs help groups of individuals (either in groups or one at a time) either by doing a specific task or, in most cases, simply being a dog. There's dogs who "help" kids read, work with hospice, and even several dogs who are allowed in courtrooms to help keep a witness calm.

Service dogs are not registered nor certified. There does not exist a national registration or certification for them. As of a few years ago, only dogs (except for some grandfathered-in guide ponies) can be service animals.

Therapy dogs/animals must be registered/certified by specific organizations before they can work in certain settings, such as hospitals and rehab centers. I would expect they need that certification before doing any public work.

Then there are "emotional support" animals. These animals help a specific individual but are not trained to do that help. They are not granted public access like service dogs but are allowed under the Fair Housing Act.

And yes, it was a small closet. It barely had room for the jacuzzi.

PaulaO2, I'm slow @ getting to read the off-topic board, but your humor is a breath of fresh air! I honestly feel that if you can't laugh just for gits-and-shins
to help you through the day, misery is too close !!! Even though my response is out of sync I still love your ablity to keep the humor going KUDOS to you and I give a big ((((((((((((((((therapy dog)))))))))))))))) hugs to your companion for life Okay
I enjoy being with a group who like to share their "Hosehead" experiences, to remind me I am not alone.
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#18
Sorry! How did I miss your post from May? Sheesh.

I am about to get a puppy! And she will be trained to be my Service Dog. Mike washed out. Not that he was bad at his job, but he was far too smart. And he smiles. He kept freaking people out thinking this snarling beast was coming after them. I tried to put it on a cue (make it a trick I could control) but it didn't work.

And I am glad I make you laugh!
PaulaO2
Apnea Board Moderator
www.ApneaBoard.com


Breathe deeply and count to zen.

INFORMATION ON APNEA BOARD FORUMS OR ON APNEABOARD.COM SHOULD NOT BE CONSIDERED AS MEDICAL ADVICE. ALWAYS SEEK THE ADVICE OF A PHYSICIAN BEFORE SEEKING TREATMENT FOR MEDICAL CONDITIONS, INCLUDING SLEEP APNEA. INFORMATION POSTED ON THE APNEA BOARD WEB SITE AND FORUMS ARE PERSONAL OPINION ONLY AND NOT NECESSARILY A STATEMENT OF FACT.




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#19
Hi, I just read this, and from what I know in PA, just because an animal is a service animal, and is "not in setting" doesn't preclude his service animal status and allow him anywhere he wants to go. My point is just because he's a sleep apnea dog wouldn't mean he couldn't be in a shopping mall, or a restaurant. He doesn't need to disclose his service, just his status is enough. If that helps.

I'm not certain of all the local laws here or state to state but I have a friend who has a harness on his retriever that says "please do not pet, service animal on duty". I once commented on the fact that he was obviously a service dog, and you let everyone pet him anyway, so what gives with the sign. It was explained to me that if the service animal is "posted" like that in PA they can't ask anything about him, and it reduced dumb questions.
If everyone thinks alike, then someone isn't thinking.
Everyone knows something, together we could know everything.
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#20
(01-23-2017, 07:03 PM)Galactus Wrote: Hi, I just read this, and from what I know in PA, just because an animal is a service animal, and is "not in setting" doesn't preclude his service animal status and allow him anywhere he wants to go. My point is just because he's a sleep apnea dog wouldn't mean he couldn't be in a shopping mall, or a restaurant. He doesn't need to disclose his service, just his status is enough. If that helps.

The idea behind a service dog (SD) is that they assist you the person with a disability. The law is all about public access. A business can ask 2 questions: "the dog is required because of a disability, and if so what the dog is trained to do" . Based on those two questions and the answers as well as the behavior of the dog, the dog can be denied access. So if I say "my dog helps me with sleep apnea" and I am in a restaurant where I do not intend to sleep, they can legally tell me to leave the dog outside. I don't see a state having a law that says a dog that only assists at home is granted the same public access rights.

Quote:I'm not certain of all the local laws here or state to state but I have a friend who has a harness on his retriever that says "please do not pet, service animal on duty". I once commented on the fact that he was obviously a service dog, and you let everyone pet him anyway, so what gives with the sign. It was explained to me that if the service animal is "posted" like that in PA they can't ask anything about him, and it reduced dumb questions.

Eh, I don't know about that. PA is a tough state for SDs since they don't officially recognize owner-trained dogs. Which is silly because what about tourists? But I digress. I couldn't find it anywhere that they had a statement about the "posted" signage on a dog. Their business how-to is what the feds use and it says two questions, may or may not have a cape, etc.

I will agree that the cape and the signage helps. Not all the time, but enough.
PaulaO2
Apnea Board Moderator
www.ApneaBoard.com


Breathe deeply and count to zen.

INFORMATION ON APNEA BOARD FORUMS OR ON APNEABOARD.COM SHOULD NOT BE CONSIDERED AS MEDICAL ADVICE. ALWAYS SEEK THE ADVICE OF A PHYSICIAN BEFORE SEEKING TREATMENT FOR MEDICAL CONDITIONS, INCLUDING SLEEP APNEA. INFORMATION POSTED ON THE APNEA BOARD WEB SITE AND FORUMS ARE PERSONAL OPINION ONLY AND NOT NECESSARILY A STATEMENT OF FACT.




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