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Sleep study
#1
Hi Everyone,

I am scheduled to have a sleep study test shortly. I wanted to know what to expect. How many sensors, how many things attached to my body, how many hours you were there/slept? I have been doing a lot of resource on OSA and trying to think if I have it or not, probably do. Kind of anxious to have it done since I know that I snore, gasp for breath and grind my teeth at night. I hope it all goes well. Thanks!
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#2
The number of leads for a sleep study PSG (polysomnogram) can vary from 7 to 12. It's not the most fun you can have trying to sleep in a strange place with all the leads and distractions. It helps to get used to falling asleep earlier ahead of time. If you usually go to bed a 11:00, try adjusting to 9:00. It's not easy and that is a big reason you don't want to do it for the first time at the study.

Try to arrange for a split study. If you are found to have apnea, make sure the study allows for titration the same night if possible. It saves a lot of time and money, compared to waiting on results then consultation, then scheduling and performing a titration study separately.

If your insurance is pretty good, it doesn't matter. For people with high deductibles, a home study, followed by self-titration with an Auto CPAP is much more affordable.
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#3
My sleep study was pretty involved - there were 32 different electrodes. However, I had the sleep study partly because it was required for surgery I was planning on having, so it was probably overkill for a simple sleep apnea diagnosis study. I was there from about 8 PM to 5:30 AM - lights off was 10 PM, lights on was 5 AM. My study was split, in that the first half was diagnosis, and if they suspected apnea, the second half was to work with the CPAP device.

I have trouble falling asleep anyway, so I usually take melatonin and diphenhydramine to help me fall asleep. They said that was totally fine - I should take any sleep medications I want / need. Even though medication might influence the results, it should simulate your sleeping situation at home as much as possible. That said, I recommend taking a sleep aid if you're accustomed to doing so.

All in all, my experience wasn't that bad, but my study apparently cost $6000 and had more of a boutique hotel setting. I'm not sure what your clinic will be like, but they vary significantly. If you have specific questions, you should call the facility and get more information.
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#4
Thanks Sleeprider. I'm not sure if I am scheduled for a split study or not. I thought that a split study would be harder since you would be woke up in the middle of the night.

How are apnea or disturbances in breathing measured? Does it have to be so many seconds or what?
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#5
(01-07-2016, 01:55 PM)Inky1 Wrote: How are apnea or disturbances in breathing measured? Does it have to be so many seconds or what?

An apnea is clinically defined as a complete stop in breathing lasting at least 10 seconds. A hypopnea is abnormally shallow breathing (detected by low amplitude in air flow rate) for at least 10 seconds.

Those are the two events that make up your AHI (apnea-hypopnea index), which is the number of events per hour and the metric used to diagnose sleep apnea. Normal is AHI < 5.
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#6
My sleep doctor gives his patients a prescription for 2 Ambian pills when he does the first visit and sets up the sleep study. They have patients bring them to the study and take one as you are getting in bed. He does say he wouldn't use Ambian just for sleep problems at home--but here, in a controlled environment, they can watch you. I slept fine for the first part of my split study--not so good for the second with the CPAP hooked up. Electrodes attached to your head are the worst--they use plenty of goopy, sticky stuff. I couldn't get it out of my very short hair until I got home into the shower.
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#7
Thanks Possum for the information. I'm not really sure if I have anything that lasts for 10 seconds throughout the night.

I mainly notice when I snore is when I sleep on either my right or left side. Sometimes on my back but not as much, as far as I know. I hope that the test results will determine that.
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#8
The test results can measure whether you're asleep or awake (EEG), respiratory effort by measuring chest expansion, airflow, heart rate, oxygen saturation, leg movement, body position, etc. Lots of stuff there. Snoring is an early sign of airway resistance, but people with more severe apnea will be aware of arousals when they don't breath, and their spouses or bed partner will tell them they stop breathing. Usually headaches, fatigue, poor concentration, even falling asleep driving are a pretty big tip-off to a problem. Many people with mild or moderate apnea might not be aware of much more than snoring.
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#9
I wish I had been caught snoring instead of falling asleep while driving and rear-ending a car stopped at a crosswalk! Pretty rough wake up call to get a sleep test!
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#10
Here down under (in Australia), arrive at Laboratory at 6pm, start getting probed up at 7pm. Ready for bed at 9 pm. Glass of wine or two (take your own). Turn off light at 10 pm.

Sleep for one hour - midnight nurse comes in and fixes up one probe that had come off. Struggle for rest of night without sleep due to cold / noise / strange bed / jet lag. 5 am nurse comes in and starts to take probes off. Then shower. TAKE EXTRA SHAMPOO as the brainwave probe gel is mighty sticky. Have cup of coffee. Nurse gives prelim results. (Yes apnea based on one hours sleep!).

Go home - have another shower to remove more gel and markers. Lie down and have a nap or go to work.

I still have my instructions, etc if you pm me your email address but your sleep clinic should give you something?
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