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Snoring Heightens Risk of Cancer
#1
Snoring Heightens Risk of Cancer, Scientists Find Published on Monday 21 May 2012 02:01 by NEWS_SCOTSMAN_COM
PEOPLE who snore and suffer from disturbed sleep may have a heightened risk of dying from cancer, a study has shown.
Snoring is one of the main symptoms of sleep disordered breathing (SDB).
New research has shown an association between SDB and cancer death which increases with severity.
Study participants with severe SDB were almost five times more likely to die of cancer than those not affected by the problem. Experts think the link may be due to breathing problems causing an inadequate supply of oxygen.
Laboratory studies have shown that intermittent hypoxia – or oxygen starvation – promotes tumour growth in mice with skin cancer. Lack of oxygen stimulates the generation of blood vessels that nourish tumours, a process known as angiogenesis.
SDB covers a range of disorders that lead to interrupted breathing during sleep.
By far the most common is obstructive sleep apnoea, in which the airway collapses, leaving the sleeper struggling for breath. Typically this produces snoring and repeated forced waking.
Sleep apnoea is known to be associated with obesity, diabetes, high blood pressure, heart attacks and strokes.
The latest research from the University of Wisconsin-Madison in the US also points to a connection with cancer mortality.
Scientists looked at 22 years worth of data on 1,522 people who took part in a study of sleep problems.
Participants underwent tests that included measurements of sleep and breathing at four-year intervals.
The results showed an association with cancer death that increased sharply with SDB severity.
People with mild SDB were just 0.1 times more likely to die from cancer than those without the problem.
But moderate SDB doubled the chances of cancer death, while severe SDB increased the risk 4.8 times.
Study leader Dr Javier Nieto, from the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, said: “The consistency of the evidence from the animal experiments and this new epidemiologic evidence in humans is highly compelling.
“In vitro [laboratory] and animal studies suggest that intermittent hypoxia promotes angiogenesis and tumour growth, which can explain these observations.
“Ours is the first study to show an association between SDB and an elevated risk of cancer mortality in a population-based sample. If the relationship between SDB and cancer mortality is validated in further studies, the diagnosis and treatment of SDB in patients with cancer might be indicated to prolong survival.
“Additional studies are needed to replicate our results and to examine the relationships between SDB, obesity, and cancer mortality.”
The findings were presented yesterday at the American Thoracic Society international conference in San Francisco.
The scientists made adjustments to take account of age, sex, body mass index (BMI – a measurement relating height and weight), smoking and other factors that may have influenced the results. One surprising discovery was that the association was stronger for non-obese patients than obese patients.
This echoed findings in mice which showed that the effects of intermittent hypoxia on cancer growth was significantly more pronounced in lean animals.
This post is a natural product. The slight variations in spelling and 
grammar enhance its individual character and beauty and in no way 
are to be considered flaws or defects.
 
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#2
Yeah, I read that.

Did you see the very last line of the article?

Something about "they did not test to see if treatment of sleep apnea such as use of CPAP made any difference in the outcome".

Gloom and doom sells more papers.
PaulaO2
Apnea Board Moderator
www.ApneaBoard.com


Breathe deeply and count to zen.

INFORMATION ON APNEA BOARD FORUMS OR ON APNEABOARD.COM SHOULD NOT BE CONSIDERED AS MEDICAL ADVICE. ALWAYS SEEK THE ADVICE OF A PHYSICIAN BEFORE SEEKING TREATMENT FOR MEDICAL CONDITIONS, INCLUDING SLEEP APNEA. INFORMATION POSTED ON THE APNEA BOARD WEB SITE AND FORUMS ARE PERSONAL OPINION ONLY AND NOT NECESSARILY A STATEMENT OF FACT.




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#3
similar articles
Sleep apnea can raise risk of cancer, studies indicate


Published May 21, 2012 Fox News and New York Times

| NewsCore




Two new studies indicate that people who suffer sleep apnea have a higher risk of developing cancer.

Due to be presented in San Francisco this week at an American Thoracic Society conference, the findings have been touted as "striking" by researchers, the New York Times reported.

Scientists say sleep apnea -- a widespread disorder suffered by 28 million Americans, which disrupts breathing and causes snoring -- is linked to low blood oxygen levels. That lack of oxygen can trigger the development of tumors.

One study, conducted at the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health over 22 years, found that severe breathing problems at night increase the likelihood of dying from cancer by 4.8 times, compared to people who had no such breathing issues. People with moderate apnea were found to have double the risk of dying.

A second set of findings, from the Spanish Sleep Network, assessed the incidence of cancer, rather than the mortality rate.

Following 5,200 people over seven years, the study tracked oxygen depletion and found, for example, that people whose oxygen levels dipped below 90 percent, for up to 12 percent of the total time asleep, had a 68 percent greater likelihood of developing cancer, than people who did not have breathing difficulties at night.

Sleep apnea is widely understood to be related to obesity, diabetes, high blood pressure, heart attacks and strokes -- conditions that are also linked to cancer.
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#4
(05-21-2012, 11:03 AM)PaulaO2 Wrote: Yeah, I read that.

Did you see the very last line of the article?

Something about "they did not test to see if treatment of sleep apnea such as use of CPAP made any difference in the outcome".

Gloom and doom sells more papers.

I agree that gloom and doom sell more papers. However, it would follow that if lowering of oxygen saturation of the blood increases tumor growth, then CPAP therapy would prevent the lowering of oxygen saturation and thus lower the incidence of tumor growth.
This post is a natural product. The slight variations in spelling and 
grammar enhance its individual character and beauty and in no way 
are to be considered flaws or defects.
 
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#5
If prolong snoring coincide with drop of oxygen levels than ought to be treated bc its deadly as having full blown apnea
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#6
(05-21-2012, 10:54 AM)Cutter Wrote: [b].....Sleep apnoea is known to be associated with obesity, diabetes, high blood pressure, heart attacks and strokes.
The latest research from the University of Wisconsin-Madison in the US also points to a connection with cancer mortality.
Scientists looked at 22 years worth of data on 1,522 people who took part in a study of sleep problems.
Participants underwent tests that included measurements of sleep and breathing at four-year intervals.
The results showed an association with cancer death that increased sharply with SDB severity.
People with mild SDB were just 0.1 times more likely to die from cancer than those without the problem.
But moderate SDB doubled the chances of cancer death, while severe SDB increased the risk 4.8 times.
Study leader Dr Javier Nieto, from the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, said: “The consistency of the evidence from the animal experiments and this new epidemiologic evidence in humans is highly compelling.
“In vitro [laboratory] and animal studies suggest that intermittent hypoxia promotes angiogenesis and tumour growth, which can explain these observations.
“Ours is the first study to show an association between SDB and an elevated risk of cancer mortality in a population-based sample. If the relationship between SDB and cancer mortality is validated in further studies, the diagnosis and treatment of SDB in patients with cancer might be indicated to prolong survival.
“Additional studies are needed to replicate our results and to examine the relationships between SDB, obesity, and cancer mortality.”
The findings were presented yesterday at the American Thoracic Society iThe scientists made adjustments to take account of age, sex, body mass index (BMI – a measurement relating height and weight), smoking and other factors that may have influenced the results. One surprising discovery was that the association was stronger for non-obese patients than obese patients.

I think this is an interesting report. Most studies which link OSA with Obesity, Diabetes, and hypertension fail at determining which occurs first, the OSA or the condition. In particular obesity is known to cause OSA, diabetes, and hypetension, and even heart failure. But what does OSA cause? Could OSA be present first before the obesity, and ensuing diabetes, hypertension and maybe even heart failure. There are very few longitudinal studies that can tell us what OSA causes over time. There are only associations with suggestions. The question of which comes first, the chicken or the egg remains with many of these conditions associated with OSA. Some would argue there isn't any cause and effect relationship, because very often the OSA remains after the other conditions are successfully managed.

On the other hand, in this study, what is surprising is that the association of sleep apnea with cancer is stronger for NON-Obese subjects. Therefore, obesity did not cause the OSA which then lead to the cancer, as could be argued with obesity causing OSA, diabetes, hypertension, heart failure, etc. Furthermore, the lab data with the mice supports all of this. The question remains, whether CPAP and the relief of OSA, can prevent cancer. Or was the cancer already brewing when the OSA began?
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#7
(05-21-2012, 01:55 PM)BabyDoc Wrote: On the other hand, in this study, what is surprising is that the association of sleep apnea with cancer is stronger for NON-Obese subjects. Therefore, obesity did not cause the OSA which then lead to the cancer, as could be argued with obesity causing OSA, diabetes, hypertension, heart failure, etc.

Huhh? Obese OSA patients are at a higher risk of cancer than non-obese patients. Non-obese OSA patients are at an even higher risk. Obesity could have caused their OSA, or OSA could have caused their obesity. I don't see how you reach our conlusion.

Quote:Furthermore, the lab data with the mice supports all of this. The question remains, whether CPAP and the relief of OSA, can prevent cancer. Or was the cancer already brewing when the OSA began?

One possible explanation given on this evening's ABC World News Tonite is that the oxygen deprivation associated by OSA causes the body to grow additional blood arteries and veins. These extra arteries provide blood flow to the tissue, nourishing it. But it would also nourish tumors.

This is like smoking. It causes damage that can lead to cancer. Stop smoking and you stop the cause of the damage. You are still at risk, but the risk declines with time.

Likewise, going on CPAP therapy stops cause of the damage. You are still at risk, but maybe the risk will decline with time?
Sleepster
Apnea Board Moderator
www.ApneaBoard.com


INFORMATION ON APNEA BOARD FORUMS OR ON APNEABOARD.COM SHOULD NOT BE CONSIDERED AS MEDICAL ADVICE. ALWAYS SEEK THE ADVICE OF A PHYSICIAN BEFORE SEEKING TREATMENT FOR MEDICAL CONDITIONS, INCLUDING SLEEP APNEA. INFORMATION POSTED ON THE APNEA BOARD WEB SITE AND FORUMS ARE PERSONAL OPINION ONLY AND NOT NECESSARILY A STATEMENT OF FACT.
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#8
I'll bet this study is what a doc friend was referring to when he told me about a week ago that apnea is more dangerous to folks who are not overweight. I still plan to ask him when I next see him (didn't have a chance to ask when he first mentioned it).
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