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Sore teeth, but not from grinding
#1
Since starting CPAP I'm waking up with sore front teeth. This is from me extending my lower jaw forward and my lower teeth are pushing my uppers outwards in my sleep. It took me a few nights to realize this but I've caught my self many times doing this during the night now. I'd really love to not rely on yet another piece of headgear - what's going on here?
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#2
Clenching. Get a night guard.
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#3
Hopefully the night guard will be needed only temporarily, as a training device.
Sleepster
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#4
What part of CPAP is causing it?
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#5
I can only guess it's caused by the stress of having to sleep with a hose full of pressurized air in the face. For some of us, myself included, adaptation is (or rather for me was) a stressful experience. It's all temporary. You can pick up a nightguard at the drug store for about $20, as I recall. You could even go cheaper and get one designed for athletic protection. That's actually a good place to start.
Sleepster
Apnea Board Moderator
www.ApneaBoard.com


INFORMATION ON APNEA BOARD FORUMS OR ON APNEABOARD.COM SHOULD NOT BE CONSIDERED AS MEDICAL ADVICE. ALWAYS SEEK THE ADVICE OF A PHYSICIAN BEFORE SEEKING TREATMENT FOR MEDICAL CONDITIONS, INCLUDING SLEEP APNEA. INFORMATION POSTED ON THE APNEA BOARD WEB SITE AND FORUMS ARE PERSONAL OPINION ONLY AND NOT NECESSARILY A STATEMENT OF FACT.
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#6
Oddly enough, I'm past the stress part (consciously). I wake up multiple times with my front teeth hurting and don't even acknowledge the leaf blower attached to my face. I was thinking it's air pressure moving things around but if not, then something strange is happening.
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#7
There is also a nerve in the front of your nose that is somehow "connected" with the nerves from your top, front teeth. New pressure from a nasal mask could result in referral pain when you are not actually clenching or grinding.

I had the same sensation and it gradually diminished over the first 2-4 weeks.
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#8
(05-16-2016, 01:33 PM)chill Wrote: There is also a nerve in the front of your nose that is somehow "connected" with the nerves from your top, front teeth. New pressure from a nasal mask could result in referral pain when you are not actually clenching or grinding.

I had the same sensation and it gradually diminished over the first 2-4 weeks.
No, mine is actually from the lower jaw pushing forward and lower teeth pushing the uppers outwards. I catch it several times a night. More so after upping the pressures a bit. I suspect pressure is somehow moving things around, but I may be in left field - I just don't know. I have a tooth guard I might be trying tonight. More junk to wear...Dont-know
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#9
(05-15-2016, 09:39 PM)Sleepster Wrote: I can only guess it's caused by the stress of having to sleep with a hose full of pressurized air in the face. For some of us, myself included, adaptation is (or rather for me was) a stressful experience. It's all temporary. You can pick up a nightguard at the drug store for about $20, as I recall. You could even go cheaper and get one designed for athletic protection. That's actually a good place to start.

I would say the athletic guards are not good. I was told by a specialist the soft rubber will cause more clenching. It needs to be made from hard plastic, and not contain bpa.
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#10
I think CPAP induced dry mouth may also cause tooth pain.
Get the free SleepyHead software here.
Useful links.
Click here for information on the main alternative to CPAP.
If it's midnight and a DME tells you it's dark outside, go and check it yourself.
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