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SpO2 readings for newbie
#1
Hi all,

I was diagnosed with moderate sleep apnea a few years ago. I haven't done anything other than dental treatments to widen my maxilla and airway, and toning exercises for my tongue and airway.

I used an SpO2 device for the first time last night, and didn't see anything alarming, but would like to know if I'm missing something obvious.

My average SpO2 level was 97%. I had 7 drops of 4% or higher, and the lowest SpO2 level recorded was 90%.

I've attached the report.

Does that seem ok?

Thanks!

[attachment=3372]
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#2
Not bad.

Many people find that sleeping on the side reduces apneas. If you aren't already doing that, test out how that works on your O2 saturation level.
                                                                                                                                                                                  
Please organize your SleeyHead screenshots like this.
I'm an epidemiologist, not a medical provider. 
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#3
how are you sleeping, do you feel that you are ceasing breathing or snoring? what caused you to want to monitor your O2? have you lost significant weight since you had your diagnosis?
you can have moderate apnea without having super-low saturations.
I am not sure that any degenerative diseases such as heart disease, stroke, thyroid diseases or diabetes occur when saturations are not severe. But, maybe.
If you do a new home sleep test, you can confirm your actual new condition.

QAL
Dedicated to QALity sleep.
You'll note I am listed as an Advisory Member. I am honored to be listed as such. See the fine print - Advisory Members as a group provide advice and suggestions to Apnea Board administrators and staff concerning Apnea Board operation and administrative policies. Membership in the Advisory Member group should not be understood as in any way implying medical expertise or qualification for advising Sleep Apnea patients concerning their treatment.
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#4
I don't think anyone would tell you to get a cpap with desaturations to 90% during sleep. According to Dr. Google, that seems quite normal.
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#5
(04-19-2017, 12:09 AM)quiescence at last Wrote: how are you sleeping, do you feel that you are ceasing breathing or snoring?  what caused you to want to monitor your O2? have you lost significant weight since you had your diagnosis?
you can have moderate apnea without having super-low saturations.
I am not sure that any degenerative diseases such as heart disease, stroke, thyroid diseases or diabetes occur when saturations are not severe.  But, maybe.
If you do a new home sleep test, you can confirm your actual new condition.

QAL

I'm not a great sleeper, but that's usually because I have kids waking me up and climbing into bed with me.

I initially got a sleep study done because my wife noticed me snoring and gasping. That was back in 2014. She says it hasn't been as bad of late, so that prompted me to try testing SpO2.

I tested it again last night and it was way worse (way more >= 4% drops, but still only down to 88% saturation at its lowest). The only difference was that I had two gin and tonics just before bed, so maybe that's something to avoid in general!

I know a pulse oximeter isn't a sleep study replacement, but I would like to know if I can get any reassurance from it seeing that my wife hasn't noticed it being as bad, and that I'm not noticing myself gasping for air in the night.

I'd really like to avoid CPAPs and ongoing sleep studies if at all possible.

Thanks!

(04-19-2017, 12:30 AM)ajack Wrote: I don't think anyone would tell you to get a cpap with desaturations to 90% during sleep. According to Dr. Google, that seems quite normal.

Are the SpO2 levels the usual determining factor for getting a CPAP?
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#6
(04-18-2017, 08:25 PM)Beej Wrote: Not bad.

Many people find that sleeping on the side reduces apneas. If you aren't already doing that, test out how that works on your O2 saturation level.

They're definitely worse when I'm on my back.

What's the usual recommendation for helping to enforce side sleeping?
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#7
Hi jamieh,


WELCOME! to the forum.!
Hang in there for more responses to your post.
trish6hundred
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#8
sorry about not getting back to you about the sleep position enforcement tools. most of the ideas float around the basic approach of strapping something on your back that makes it uncomfortable to be in that position. one is sewing a pouch in the back of jammies/shirt, and placing a tennis ball into it. another one is tying a cloth belt and positioning the knot into place in the middle of your back. you could try duct taping a matchbox car to your back. one user created an elaborate wedge shaped trough in their bed, so side sleeping was only thing possible.

QAL
Dedicated to QALity sleep.
You'll note I am listed as an Advisory Member. I am honored to be listed as such. See the fine print - Advisory Members as a group provide advice and suggestions to Apnea Board administrators and staff concerning Apnea Board operation and administrative policies. Membership in the Advisory Member group should not be understood as in any way implying medical expertise or qualification for advising Sleep Apnea patients concerning their treatment.
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#9
(04-19-2017, 12:52 PM)jamieh Wrote:
(04-19-2017, 12:30 AM)ajack Wrote: I don't think anyone would tell you to get a cpap with desaturations to 90% during sleep. According to Dr. Google, that seems quite normal.

Are the SpO2 levels the usual determining factor for getting a CPAP?

see if you can get a copy of your original sleep study, it may shed some light on where you were and where you are now.
Subject to your doctor review. I think the results you showed makes it optional, for personal comfort, if snoring disturbs your wife etc. Looking at your chart, there was one episode that hung around 92-3%. there was a total of 4 single lines that went below this and none below 90%.  
have a google, 4% drops are very normal and all above 90% is ok. google normal spo2 during sleep.

this one of my relative is a bit messy and needs a study. 32 minutes below 88%
http://imgur.com/gallery/FrT8O

my study was 25 minutes below 90%
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#10
A bolstering pillow to prop you on your side can be helpful to support side sleeping.
                                                                                                                                                                                  
Please organize your SleeyHead screenshots like this.
I'm an epidemiologist, not a medical provider. 
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