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Stopping Win 10
#61
(05-10-2016, 11:28 PM)justMongo Wrote:
(05-10-2016, 10:00 PM)Sleeprider Wrote: My newest computer has no DVD drive, and only has USB 3, SD, HDMI and of course fast wi-fi and (surprisingly) wired ethernet. Alan, the huge drives are okay, but the cool trend is solid-state up to 1-GB.

Respectfully, do you mean up to 1 TB? I have a W7 machine I put together with two 1 TB Samsung SSDs. And it boots so fast the Windows flag doesn't get a chance to form.


TB is indeed what I meant. My thoughts are stuck in the 90s when GB was a lot...now my camera and phone each have 64 GB...neither digital technology really existed then.
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#62
I came across this article on M$'s push of WIn10 and thought I'd pass it along.

Microsoft's Windows 10 upgrades are getting even more sneaky-pushy
5-15-2016 - by Lance Whitney

Microsoft has a new way of trying to get Windows 10 onto your computer, whether you want it or not.

Users of Windows 7 and 8.1 have become familiar with -- jaded by, even -- the insistent, seemingly daily popups urging them to "Get Window 10." Those messages have started taking a more aggressive turn.

Instead of simply giving you the option to install its latest operating system (or not), Microsoft now automatically schedules a date and time to update your PC to Windows 10. If you don't want the software update or if you want to change the installation date, you have to take deliberate action: manually click a link in the message, then choose to reschedule it or cancel it altogether.

Kinda sneaky, isn't it? Especially compared with the messages you've been seeing. If you click the OK button, thinking you're just getting rid of the message, the automatic update is scheduled. You'll then find Windows 10 on your PC sometime over the next several days without realizing that you agreed to it.

Microsoft did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

Following the debacle of the little-loved Windows 8, Microsoft has been working hard to convince people to jump to Windows 10, which is available for free to users of Windows 7 or 8.1. That freebie, though, is due to end July 29, the one-year anniversary of version 10's debut. After that date, people will have to pay to upgrade. In other words, they'll have even less incentive.

The latest version of Windows has been making inroads. Earlier this month, Microsoft announced that Windows 10 had found a home on 300 million active devices, a tally that includes PCs, phones and the Xbox One game console. That's nearly a third of the way to the software giant's goal of reaching 1 billion Windows 10 devices within two to three years of the software's release.

Likewise, Windows 10 leapfrogged both Windows 8.1 and the aging, enduring Windows XP earlier this year to become the second most widely used version of the software that once defined personal computing for many. Windows 7 remains top dog, accounting for nearly 50 percent of desktops running versions of the operating system.

After July 29, upgrading to the Home version of Windows 10 will cost $119, while the Pro flavor will be priced at $199. Oh, and sneaking in there sometime this summer, possibly in July, will be another freebie offer: the Windows 10 Anniversary edition, sporting enhancements to the Cortana personal assistant and the Hello login feature, along with support for the HoloLens augmented-reality headset.

Statistics prove that people who have more birthdays live longer.
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#63
(05-16-2016, 12:10 PM)Crimson Nape Wrote: I came across this article on M$'s push of WIn10 and thought I'd pass it along.

Microsoft's Windows 10 upgrades are getting even more sneaky-pushy
5-15-2016 - by Lance Whitney

Microsoft has a new way of trying to get Windows 10 onto your computer, whether you want it or not.

Users of Windows 7 and 8.1 have become familiar with -- jaded by, even -- the insistent, seemingly daily popups urging them to "Get Window 10." Those messages have started taking a more aggressive turn.

Instead of simply giving you the option to install its latest operating system (or not), Microsoft now automatically schedules a date and time to update your PC to Windows 10. If you don't want the software update or if you want to change the installation date, you have to take deliberate action: manually click a link in the message, then choose to reschedule it or cancel it altogether.

Kinda sneaky, isn't it? Especially compared with the messages you've been seeing. If you click the OK button, thinking you're just getting rid of the message, the automatic update is scheduled. You'll then find Windows 10 on your PC sometime over the next several days without realizing that you agreed to it.

Microsoft did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

Following the debacle of the little-loved Windows 8, Microsoft has been working hard to convince people to jump to Windows 10, which is available for free to users of Windows 7 or 8.1. That freebie, though, is due to end July 29, the one-year anniversary of version 10's debut. After that date, people will have to pay to upgrade. In other words, they'll have even less incentive.

The latest version of Windows has been making inroads. Earlier this month, Microsoft announced that Windows 10 had found a home on 300 million active devices, a tally that includes PCs, phones and the Xbox One game console. That's nearly a third of the way to the software giant's goal of reaching 1 billion Windows 10 devices within two to three years of the software's release.

Likewise, Windows 10 leapfrogged both Windows 8.1 and the aging, enduring Windows XP earlier this year to become the second most widely used version of the software that once defined personal computing for many. Windows 7 remains top dog, accounting for nearly 50 percent of desktops running versions of the operating system.

After July 29, upgrading to the Home version of Windows 10 will cost $119, while the Pro flavor will be priced at $199. Oh, and sneaking in there sometime this summer, possibly in July, will be another freebie offer: the Windows 10 Anniversary edition, sporting enhancements to the Cortana personal assistant and the Hello login feature, along with support for the HoloLens augmented-reality headset.

I have a small HP laptop PC and just this afternoon I received a onscreen notice that my laptop will be updated May 18, 2016. I don't want this upgrade, but I'm afraid that if I don't allow it to happen, that neither of my PCs will work right anymore. I am not tech savvy at all. If this update happens and it screws up my machine, that will be the end of my enjoyment of having the Internet. Dont-know

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#64
(05-16-2016, 02:56 PM)GrammaBear Wrote: I have a small HP laptop PC and just this afternoon I received a onscreen notice that my laptop will be updated May 18, 2016. I don't want this upgrade, but I'm afraid that if I don't allow it to happen, that neither of my PCs will work right anymore. I am not tech savvy at all. If this update happens and it screws up my machine, that will be the end of my enjoyment of having the Internet. Dont-know

Supposedly, you have up to 30 days to roll it back to the previous version. If you had Win7, I'd consider rolling it back but if you had Win8 then I would just stick with the Win10 upgrade. Basically Win10 is Win8.1 with lipstick. Big Grin

Statistics prove that people who have more birthdays live longer.
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#65
(05-16-2016, 03:22 PM)Crimson Nape Wrote:
(05-16-2016, 02:56 PM)GrammaBear Wrote: I have a small HP laptop PC and just this afternoon I received a onscreen notice that my laptop will be updated May 18, 2016. I don't want this upgrade, but I'm afraid that if I don't allow it to happen, that neither of my PCs will work right anymore. I am not tech savvy at all. If this update happens and it screws up my machine, that will be the end of my enjoyment of having the Internet. Dont-know

Supposedly, you have up to 30 days to roll it back to the previous version. If you had Win7, I'd consider rolling it back but if you had Win8 then I would just stick with the Win10 upgrade. Basically Win10 is Win8.1 with lipstick. Big Grin

I have Win 7 on my desktop and also on my laptop. Dealing with Microsoft feels like dealing with the Mafia (whatever that might feel like).

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#66
(05-16-2016, 03:22 PM)Crimson Nape Wrote: ...Basically Win10 is Win8.1 with lipstick. Big Grin

[Image: images?q=tbn:ANd9GcRBvSbMAyN1xJxbvpLbiRd...aGiCYibYkY]
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#67
(05-16-2016, 03:39 PM)justMongo Wrote:
(05-16-2016, 03:22 PM)Crimson Nape Wrote: ...Basically Win10 is Win8.1 with lipstick. Big Grin

[Image: images?q=tbn:ANd9GcRBvSbMAyN1xJxbvpLbiRd...aGiCYibYkY]

Love this piggie

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#68
Thank goodness I'm still running Windows xp!
Coffee
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#69
I now have a desktop computer with a totally blank screen after I 'declined' to accept the installation of Windows 10. Did I mention that I hate Microsoft ?? Crying-into-tissue
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#70
It's a good thing you have a nice current backup image to rescue your system.

Dude
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