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Taking a break from CPAP
#21
I sleep without the mask on night a week per my doctors prescription.
I do not feel any different on my off day. I do however, wake up more often on those nights.

I read on the forum that off days are unusual so I question my doctor. He is concerned about something called CPAP dependency that raises the risk of heart attack and stroke.

The big question here is whether you have comorbidities that make you a high risk for stroke, heart failure or desaturations > 3 min
If you have those comorbidities you are already a high risk, and you won't make it any higher by being dependent on the CPAP.

(06-04-2016, 09:57 PM)Jim Bronson Wrote: Anyone take occasional breaks from therapy? I've been on CPAP for about 1.5 years, and I've used it continuously over that period except for once or twice when I've been ill and during a couple of brief vacations. I didn't notice much difference in how I felt in the morning during those breaks, and I slept about as well as I do while using the therapy.

I'm thinking that taking a break once in a while doesn't do any harm.

2004-Bon Jovi
it'll take more than a doctor to prescribe a remedy

Observations and recommendations communicated here are the perceptions of the writer and should not be misconstrued as medical advice.
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#22
(06-06-2016, 11:59 AM)0rangebear Wrote: I sleep without the mask on night a week per my doctors prescription.
I do not feel any different on my off day. I do however, wake up more often on those nights.

I read on the forum that off days are unusual so I question my doctor. He is concerned about something called CPAP dependency that raises the risk of heart attack and stroke.

The big question here is whether you have comorbidities that make you a high risk for stroke, heart failure or desaturations > 3 min
If you have those comorbidities you are already a high risk, and you won't make it any higher by being dependent on the CPAP.

Not using a CPAP when moderate or severe OSA is present, wrecks your cardiovascular system (leading to atrial fibrilation and other problems), among other systems. Even just for naps. The only physicians that use the term "CPAP dependency" are ENT surgeons that promote UPPP surgery as superior to PAP therapy. I would consider the advise from any physician asserting a "higher risk for CPAP dependency" to be suspect at least. Find the clinical study that supports their position. Doesn't exist.
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#23
(06-06-2016, 12:20 PM)Sleeprider Wrote:
(06-06-2016, 11:59 AM)0rangebear Wrote: I sleep without the mask on night a week per my doctors prescription.
I do not feel any different on my off day. I do however, wake up more often on those nights.

I read on the forum that off days are unusual so I question my doctor. He is concerned about something called CPAP dependency that raises the risk of heart attack and stroke.

The big question here is whether you have comorbidities that make you a high risk for stroke, heart failure or desaturations > 3 min
If you have those comorbidities you are already a high risk, and you won't make it any higher by being dependent on the CPAP.
The only physicians that use the term "CPAP dependency" are ENT surgeons that promote UPPP surgery as superior to PAP therapy.

FYI
The doctor I am referring to is a Endocrinologist at the number one respiratory hospital in the US. He is not a surgeon and does not advocate surgery for sleep apnea nor does he advocate bypass surgery for obesity.

He is also registered with the Colorado Bar association as an expert witness for Sleep disorder evidence.

http://denvercolorado.org/health-and-fit...sh-health/
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#24
(06-06-2016, 12:20 PM)Sleeprider Wrote:
(06-06-2016, 11:59 AM)0rangebear Wrote: I sleep without the mask on night a week per my doctors prescription.
I do not feel any different on my off day. I do however, wake up more often on those nights.

I read on the forum that off days are unusual so I question my doctor. He is concerned about something called CPAP dependency that raises the risk of heart attack and stroke.

The big question here is whether you have comorbidities that make you a high risk for stroke, heart failure or desaturations > 3 min
If you have those comorbidities you are already a high risk, and you won't make it any higher by being dependent on the CPAP.

Not using a CPAP when moderate or severe OSA is present, wrecks your cardiovascular system (leading to atrial fibrilation and other problems), among other systems. Even just for naps. The only physicians that use the term "CPAP dependency" are ENT surgeons that promote UPPP surgery as superior to PAP therapy. I would consider the advise from any physician asserting a "higher risk for CPAP dependency" to be suspect at least. Find the clinical study that supports their position. Doesn't exist.

Here's 2 cents: If you have/had blood relatives with any of the named comorbidities,(if you have been diagnosed with) you may consider getting on the bus. It is your choice to live a healthier life, & with the histories in your back pocket, you might think about doing some research about the compounding affects sleep apnea causes to any of the issues... I have done a lot of research on lots of these issues and the evidence is strikingly overwhelming! Not a doctor, just saying.... did your doctor give you a reason for the more frequent wake-ups during the "off xPAP nights" or do you have an idea why? What does your gut tell ya'? Second opinions from a sleep specialist (if available) can't hurt either. 2 cents added to the pot.

I enjoy being with a group who like to share their "Hosehead" experiences, to remind me I am not alone.
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#25
(06-06-2016, 12:42 PM)0rangebear Wrote: FYI
The doctor I am referring to is a Endocrinologist at the number one respiratory hospital in the US. He is not a surgeon and does not advocate surgery for sleep apnea nor does he advocate bypass surgery for obesity.

He is also registered with the Colorado Bar association as an expert witness for Sleep disorder evidence.

http://denvercolorado.org/health-and-fit...sh-health/

While your doctor has excellent qualifications, he is expressing an opinion, not a vetted study that shows improved efficacy or cardiovascular results for intermittent CPAP therapy. All of the clinical evidence I have seen seems to contradict his opinion. As I said before, show me the study or evidence that this has even been looked at, let alone finding repeatable results.
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#26
No strokes, Heart attacks, or Cancer in my family history. I have many 80-98 year old obease diabetics in the family. About half of them are on CPAP. Some of them have been on it for 20 years. So far no noticeable difference in the age of death by the users.

The awakenings appear to be related to urination. This is a topic in the forum about why you urinate less on therapy. On therapy I sleep through the night half the time. On my night off I am always up once. sometimes twice.

Good question Luvmyzzz

(06-06-2016, 12:51 PM)Luvmyzzz Wrote:
(06-06-2016, 12:20 PM)Sleeprider Wrote:
(06-06-2016, 11:59 AM)0rangebear Wrote: I sleep without the mask on night a week per my doctors prescription.
I do not feel any different on my off day. I do however, wake up more often on those nights.

I read on the forum that off days are unusual so I question my doctor. He is concerned about something called CPAP dependency that raises the risk of heart attack and stroke.

The big question here is whether you have comorbidities that make you a high risk for stroke, heart failure or desaturations > 3 min
If you have those comorbidities you are already a high risk, and you won't make it any higher by being dependent on the CPAP.

Not using a CPAP when moderate or severe OSA is present, wrecks your cardiovascular system (leading to atrial fibrilation and other problems), among other systems. Even just for naps. The only physicians that use the term "CPAP dependency" are ENT surgeons that promote UPPP surgery as superior to PAP therapy. I would consider the advise from any physician asserting a "higher risk for CPAP dependency" to be suspect at least. Find the clinical study that supports their position. Doesn't exist.

Here's 2 cents: If you have/had blood relatives with any of the named comorbidities,(if you have been diagnosed with) you may consider getting on the bus. It is your choice to live a healthier life, & with the histories in your back pocket, you might think about doing some research about the compounding affects sleep apnea causes to any of the issues... I have done a lot of research on lots of these issues and the evidence is strikingly overwhelming! Not a doctor, just saying.... did your doctor give you a reason for the more frequent wake-ups during the "off xPAP nights" or do you have an idea why? What does your gut tell ya'? Second opinions from a sleep specialist (if available) can't hurt either. 2 cents added to the pot.

2004-Bon Jovi
it'll take more than a doctor to prescribe a remedy

Observations and recommendations communicated here are the perceptions of the writer and should not be misconstrued as medical advice.
Post Reply Post Reply


#27
A few years ago, after quite a long period of successful CPAP use, I suddenly found it impossible to tolerate. I had a lot of things going on in my life and it became just one more thing that I didn't want to deal with. I ended up not using it for nearly 3 months.
It wasn't that I noticed any difference after a couple of days, but in hindsight, I know over time my health and wellbeing deteriorated slowly, which in a way was worse because I didn't notice it so much. I guess my point is, even if you don't feel any different after a couple of nights, there may still be damage going on. I'm happy to say I came back from the brink of abandoning CPAP altogether and my conviction in using it is stronger than ever. I never miss a night now, I take it everywhere with me even if it's sometimes a hassle, which it undoubtedly is. I kick myself now for gambling with my health for those few months, it just wasn't a risk worth taking. These days, to me, going somewhere without my CPAP would be like a diabetic not bringing a supply of insulin. Whatever you decide to do, I'd recommend you keep these breaks to a minimum, and in the long term, maybe eliminate them altogether. Good luck Smile
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#28
(06-06-2016, 06:02 PM)andyjh64 Wrote: A few years ago, after quite a long period of successful CPAP use, I suddenly found it impossible to tolerate. I had a lot of things going on in my life and it became just one more thing that I didn't want to deal with. I ended up not using it for nearly 3 months.
It wasn't that I noticed any difference after a couple of days, but in hindsight, I know over time my health and wellbeing deteriorated slowly, which in a way was worse because I didn't notice it so much. I guess my point is, even if you don't feel any different after a couple of nights, there may still be damage going on. I'm happy to say I came back from the brink of abandoning CPAP altogether and my conviction in using it is stronger than ever. I never miss a night now, I take it everywhere with me even if it's sometimes a hassle, which it undoubtedly is. I kick myself now for gambling with my health for those few months, it just wasn't a risk worth taking. These days, to me, going somewhere without my CPAP would be like a diabetic not bringing a supply of insulin. Whatever you decide to do, I'd recommend you keep these breaks to a minimum, and in the long term, maybe eliminate them altogether. Good luck Smile

Very Well said andyjh64, there are many who don't realize (or don't want to know) the implications of their choices. I hope your wakening words are heeded.

Good Luck to YouThanks and most of all Sleep-well
I enjoy being with a group who like to share their "Hosehead" experiences, to remind me I am not alone.
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#29
How well a person sleeps is subjective. You could be waking up 10 times an hour to breathe, for example, have no memory of it, and be under the impression that you got a good night's sleep. But your alertness may suffer, and motorcycle accidents are more dangerous than automobile accidents.

Maybe skipping CPAP therapy won't hurt you, but it definitely won't help you.

BTW, I've never heard of the issue of CPAP dependency, and I don't understand any associated dangers. I've also never heard of anyone being advised to intentionally skip CPAP therapy.
Sleepster
Apnea Board Moderator
www.ApneaBoard.com


INFORMATION ON APNEA BOARD FORUMS OR ON APNEABOARD.COM SHOULD NOT BE CONSIDERED AS MEDICAL ADVICE. ALWAYS SEEK THE ADVICE OF A PHYSICIAN BEFORE SEEKING TREATMENT FOR MEDICAL CONDITIONS, INCLUDING SLEEP APNEA. INFORMATION POSTED ON THE APNEA BOARD WEB SITE AND FORUMS ARE PERSONAL OPINION ONLY AND NOT NECESSARILY A STATEMENT OF FACT.
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#30
(06-06-2016, 08:10 PM)Sleepster Wrote: How well a person sleeps is subjective. You could be waking up 10 times an hour to breathe, for example, have no memory of it, and be under the impression that you got a good night's sleep. But your alertness may suffer, and motorcycle accidents are more dangerous than automobile accidents.

Maybe skipping CPAP therapy won't hurt you, but it definitely won't help you.

BTW, I've never heard of the issue of CPAP dependency, and I don't understand any associated dangers. I've also never heard of anyone being advised to intentionally skip CPAP therapy.

Valid points Sleepster, the dependency (I don't think)is necessarily with the machine , but on the QUALITY of sleep itself. I read and heard that if the body struggles for air... the struggles eventually takes a toll on the most apparent systems, starting with the circulation... and the domino effect starts, I personally don't believe anyone should EVER skip this therapy, I won't, not if I can help it.
But we are all adults here, we know we have to live with ALL the decisions we make regarding our health, our happiness, and the immediate world around us.
Thank you for your valid points, all well taken.
I enjoy being with a group who like to share their "Hosehead" experiences, to remind me I am not alone.
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