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The HDM Z1
#21
Article about the Z1 CPAP:

Sleep apnea device company’s big lesson on marketing to patients: Make them feel cool


by Lindsey Alexander


With the drive to value from volume, medical device companies need to start focusing on how to effectively market to patients, their newest customers. Human Design Medical, the company that just launched the smallest, lightest CPAP machine on the market, has done extremely smart marketing for its smart product.

When reading about it, I could envision a perfect customer immediately, several people in particular sprang to mind. I actually called them to tell them to look into the device to see if it fit their needs. I look at dozens of innovative devices a week. I hardly ever encourage friends and family to look into them. While some might scoff–She’s a writer, not a doctor–and I’d tend to agree, this is how sales are made and a great reputation is born. Even in 2013, you can’t beat word-of-mouth.

Here are three lessons medical device manufacturers who will be selling directly to patients should take from HDM’s smart Z1 launch:

1) Unlike what many headlines would have you believe, not all obese patients are the same. You’re going to need to narrow your audience.

While many sleep apnea patients may benefit from the company’s Z1 CPAP, HDM focuses on the jetset patient: business people, flying from airport to airport. This audience wants to make it quickly through airport security. They want to be able to sleep soundly on an international flight

2) No one wants to think of themselves as obese.

This isn’t all about weight. Everyone’s definition of beauty is different. It’s about medicalization. When a medical device is as integrated into a patient’s life as a CPAP, used at least a third of the day, it needs to fit well into the patient’s lifestyle. It also doesn’t need to scream disease or condition at it every time they look at it.

Browse HDM’s website. Obesity isn’t mentioned once as far as I can tell. (Sleep apnea is not just a condition obese patients may suffer from, but many sleep apnea patients are obese.)

Rather they focus on its cool design features and portability. Rather than stereotypical marketing art of patients (?) sitting awkwardly in rocking chairs or playing baseball, the images are of the device in front of settings a CPAP normally wouldn’t cut it. This allows it to appeal to both the great outdoorsman, the city slicker businessman and those who just aspire to be. (Plus, of course, those who keep telling themselves they’d take a trip only if a device fit their needs.)

Medical device manufacturers need to focus on helping to create the dream life–rather than minimal quality of life–and do it in every part of branding.

3) At their best, devices shouldn’t be indicators of illness, but cool conversation pieces.

Aside from convenience, the device is designed to fit into a patient’s life. At the airport, he’s not going to get harassed in the security check, reminded of his condition. In fact, it looks sort of. . . cool.

Check out this blog post from user and SVP of Sales and Marketing Steve Moore, who talks about what people think the device is. (Hint, they don’t think it’s a medical device.)

Bottom line: Of course, the first step is to have an excellent, necessary device. From that point on, the marketing begins. And good marketing begins with good product design.


Fair Use from:
http://medcitynews.com/2013/11/lesson-sl...feel-cool/

The above post may contain copyrighted material the use of which has not always been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. The material available is intended to advance the understanding of Sleep Apnea treatment and to advance the educational level of Sleep Apnea patients with regard to their health. Sometimes included is the full text of articles and documents rather than a simple link because outside links frequently "go bad" or change over time. This constitutes a "fair use" of any such copyrighted material as provided for in section 107 of the US Copyright Law. In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. Section 107, the material in this post is distributed without fee or payment of any kind for research and educational purposes. If you wish to use copyrighted material from this post for purposes of your own that go beyond "fair use", you must obtain permission from the copyright owner.
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#22
Hi there can someone tell me how to enter the clinician mode on the Z1 so I can adjust the pressure? Thanks
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#23
(12-03-2013, 11:14 PM)sleeperawake Wrote: Hi there can someone tell me how to enter the clinician mode on the Z1 so I can adjust the pressure? Thanks
http://www.apneaboard.com/forums/Thread-...DM-Z1-cpap

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#24
Hi sleeperawake,
WELCOME! to the forum.!
trish6hundred
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#25
I've been a very satisfied user of a System One for 3 1/2 years, but have been traveling more, and it's a nuisance to carry around, so I just purchased a Z1, and it arrived yesterday.

My main concerns were the static pressure (system one is an auto cpap), and the humidifier, or lack thereof; but I think I will be OK on both of these. The bigger issue, as has been mentioned above, is the exhale pressure, in fact the whole "algorithm" is going to be hard to get used to. Maybe because I grew accustomed to my current machine, which has a very natural feeling breathe in-and-out, almost from the first time I put it on, loved it. In contrast, the Z1, despite touting the algorithm as a unique selling point, is very uncomfortable thus far for me. Even on the #2 setting, it feels too slow. I find I'm exhaling against pressure, which only slowly subsides, and then I'm inhaling against suction. Could I be breathing too fast? It seems only in sync with long, sloooooow, relaxed breathing of about 3 seconds per cycle, whereas about 2 seconds feels right for me. At this point I can only hope I will either be able to get used to it (hard for a travel machine as I'll be switching back and forth), or that there will be a firmware upgrade for it as it's been mentioned this is possible. I'm sure hoping I don't end up with a $600 brick. I tried it last night for a few hours, but couldn't sleep and switched back to my regular machine. I'll try again on an overnight trip soon.
The humidifier worked fine for me, didn't dry out over the few hours I had it on, felt comfortable.
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#26
Hi jflorencejr,
WELCOME! to the forum.!
Best of luck with your new travel machine and I hope you are able to get used to it soon.
trish6hundred
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#27
(12-31-2013, 11:01 AM)jflorencejr Wrote: I've been a very satisfied user of a System One for 3 1/2 years, but have been traveling more, and it's a nuisance to carry around, so I just purchased a Z1, and it arrived yesterday.

My main concerns were the static pressure (system one is an auto cpap), and the humidifier, or lack thereof; but I think I will be OK on both of these. The bigger issue, as has been mentioned above, is the exhale pressure, in fact the whole "algorithm" is going to be hard to get used to. Maybe because I grew accustomed to my current machine, which has a very natural feeling breathe in-and-out, almost from the first time I put it on, loved it. In contrast, the Z1, despite touting the algorithm as a unique selling point, is very uncomfortable thus far for me. Even on the #2 setting, it feels too slow. I find I'm exhaling against pressure, which only slowly subsides, and then I'm inhaling against suction. Could I be breathing too fast? It seems only in sync with long, sloooooow, relaxed breathing of about 3 seconds per cycle, whereas about 2 seconds feels right for me. At this point I can only hope I will either be able to get used to it (hard for a travel machine as I'll be switching back and forth), or that there will be a firmware upgrade for it as it's been mentioned this is possible. I'm sure hoping I don't end up with a $600 brick. I tried it last night for a few hours, but couldn't sleep and switched back to my regular machine. I'll try again on an overnight trip soon.
The humidifier worked fine for me, didn't dry out over the few hours I had it on, felt comfortable.
Hello jflorencejr, I would be happy to speak with you about your Z1 experience and see if there could be a remedy for the concern you mentioned. If you would send me an email: steve.moore@hdmusa.com we can set up a time to chat. Thank you, Steve
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#28
As a followup, just spent four nights with the Z1 and was able to get used to it, and would definitely recommend this as a travel cpap. The exhale issue decreased over the night, and was also reduced by not using ramp. It is a tad noisy -- not sure if its the hose, or the machine, as moving the hose away from me reduced the noise. Also, whether the in-line humidifier units are worth it at $5 ea/ (one per night) remains to be seen I suppose. I was in a dry area and experienced a bit of discomfort, even while using the humidifier, but not enough to be a deal-breaker.

The form factor, size and weight of the "i-cpap" are just great, and it's great to have this option available for travel.
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#29
(11-26-2013, 08:29 PM)stick Wrote:
(11-26-2013, 10:17 AM)SuperSleeper Wrote: I'd like to know if the Data Viewing software for the PC is available for the end-user, or is it for use by the sleep doctor primarily? If it's also for the patient to monitor progress, how is the software distributed, via CD along with the machine or via download?

The Z1™ software ('HDM Data Viewer') will be for every user and will be included for free by download (the OSX version will be available soon after the initial release). We anticipate that the software will be available within the month at no charge to Z1™ owners.

FYI- We believe that access to sleep-data is really important and we want every user to be involved in their therapy:-)

Still no sign of the software. Anybody have any idea when this will occur?
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#30
The Data Viewer will be available for users and clinicians. It will be a download from our site when it is ready. Soon we will release a PC version that is very easy to use and complete with usage & leak information. Shortly after that will be a MAC version of the same software. We are headed to a multi-platform software with AHI information once we have FDA clearance. When this happens it will not matter what your platform is and the Bluetooth capability will be enabled on the Z1.

(01-13-2014, 11:00 PM)Mickps Wrote:
(11-26-2013, 08:29 PM)stick Wrote:
(11-26-2013, 10:17 AM)SuperSleeper Wrote: I'd like to know if the Data Viewing software for the PC is available for the end-user, or is it for use by the sleep doctor primarily? If it's also for the patient to monitor progress, how is the software distributed, via CD along with the machine or via download?

The Z1™ software ('HDM Data Viewer') will be for every user and will be included for free by download (the OSX version will be available soon after the initial release). We anticipate that the software will be available within the month at no charge to Z1™ owners.

FYI- We believe that access to sleep-data is really important and we want every user to be involved in their therapy:-)

Still no sign of the software. Anybody have any idea when this will occur?

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