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This is really getting old.
#1
This is really getting old.
They found their way up the mountain, so I say let the dumb-asses find their own way back down. 

Obviously, they all have more money than they do common sense. Am I just being harsh?  Rolleyes

https://www.yahoo.com/gma/8-climbers-mis...ories.html
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#2
RE: This is really getting old.
This is a more complete account of the situation https://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-india-48488802

Apparently rescue efforts returned 4 individuals that were stranded on the mountain. The situation does not seem favorable for survival of the remaining 13 members of the expedition who lost communications following avalanche activity on the peak May 26. I think you know that the mountain climbing community is pretty tight, and these are well-known and experienced mountaineers, not the yahoos on Everest. I wish them safe return, but they are in extremely harsh conditions at altitudes that don't support survival for long. Ice falls and avalanches are uncontrollable hazards that even experienced mountain climbers can't always read. I suspect they are lost, and yeah, I think you're being a bit harsh. We all choose our risks according to our tolerance and the risk-reward. Even people that don't take risks wind up on the wrong side of a fall, traffic accident or random fatal encounter.
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#3
RE: This is really getting old.
(06-02-2019, 07:04 PM)Sleeprider Wrote: This is a more complete account of the situation https://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-india-48488802

Apparently rescue efforts returned 4 individuals that were stranded on the mountain.  The situation does not seem favorable for survival of the remaining 13 members of the expedition who lost communications following avalanche activity on the peak May 26.   I think you know that the mountain climbing community is pretty tight, and these are well-known and experienced mountaineers, not the yahoos on Everest.  I wish them safe return, but they are in extremely harsh conditions at altitudes that don't support survival for long.  Ice falls and avalanches are  uncontrollable hazards that even experienced mountain climbers can't always read.  I suspect they are lost, and yeah, I think you're being a bit harsh.  We all choose our risks according to our tolerance and the risk-reward.  Even people that don't take risks wind up on the wrong side of a fall, traffic accident or random fatal encounter.

All these climbers know exactly how dangerous such a trek can be. And yet, they choose to proceed. They were willing to risk it all for a claim to fame, however tentative that might be. 

I don't wish harm to any of them. If you make it up and then back down, that's great. I'd bet my last dollar though, that if they knew from the start, that if they chose to proceed, and if they got into trouble, that no one would come for them, they'd still choose to give it a shot and chance losing everything in the process. 

That indicates to me, that they are not concerned about their own well-being / mortality. If they are not concerned about their own, why should others be?  Dont-know
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#4
RE: This is really getting old.
So apply your argument to a motorcycle rider, and tell me how that works out for you.
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#5
RE: This is really getting old.
(06-02-2019, 08:41 PM)Sleeprider Wrote: So apply your argument to a motorcycle rider, and tell me how that works out for you.

A m/c is a mode of transportation. I've been riding on the street for 48 yrs. Only been hit once by a car. The driver was a young female licensed to drive for less than 3 months. 

I don't ride to challenge anyone or anything. I do so, primarily for pleasure. Years ago, I rode to and from work here and there. I don't do that any longer. 

The single most dangerous thing a person can do on a daily basis, is to simply get into a vehicle and drive. The vast majority of drivers don't give that a second thought. If they did, and were well aware of the nut jobs on the road, they'd most likely pay way more attention to driving and others on the road. 

In this day & age, driving is more a necessity than an option. Even riding in an Uber or Lyft can be dangerous. My adult step-son is a new Uber driver. He's seriously rethinking his choice to be one. 

If by some chance I did go down while riding, I'm not asking anyone to risk their life to come to my aid. I was in LE for 30 yrs. I'm well versed when it comes to responding to the aid of others, and putting my life on the line, when needed. That happened way more than I like to recall. 

Anyways, not quite sure of the line of logic that you are pursuing in regards to m/c riders and mountain climbers. One is a simple daily way of life, and the other, not so much.
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#6
RE: This is really getting old.
It's the same, and similar choices. Not to be morbid, but there are many former motorcyclists vegetating in nursing homes at public expense for their choice. Someone less risk tolerant than you, might view your everyday mode of transportation an unreasonable and foolish risk, and if you have an accident, they will consider it your own fault, even if you're not at fault. But let's get back to mountaineers. They pursue a passion and don't expect or ask for a rescue mission. In all likelihood these individuals will have their eternal rest in the ice and snow of that high peak. The search and rescue operation may or may not get answers, but they almost certainly will not rescue anyone, and they also won't recover a body at the risk of endangering themselves. So you view them as unreasonable risk takers, and they have spent their lives learning to mitigate that danger...sometimes it's not enough.

People engage in many different levels of risk. From recreational skiers to extreme backcountry skiers, from bicyclists to extreme downhill Xcross, from parachuting to extreme flight suits, from sightseers to extreme selfie photographers, from cruising to stunting, or just lacking skill and taking a curve too hot. There are thousands of ways people have devised to kill themselves, and i guess you are free to judge them or not, but I have to respect a skilled mountaineer dying doing what he loves. We don't have to approve of what they do to understand they made the ultimate sacrifice for their own passion. It beats the really dumb ways Darwin award winners come up with.
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#7
RE: This is really getting old.
The reader comments are interesting, if nothing else. 

Foolish or not, may they RIP. 

https://www.yahoo.com/news/search-missin...22754.html
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#8
RE: This is really getting old.
My next door neighbor, who was a career police officer, took a ride on his motorcycle with his wife one Saturday afternoon. He and his wife often rode in our rural neighborhood just for the sheer pleasure of riding and having some fresh air. Less than 5 miles from home a pickup truck ran a stop sign because he said he didn't see any harm because no one was coming. Because he ran that stop sign, he hit and killed my neighbor who was just 2 weeks from retirement after 25 years on the force. He also permanently injured my neighbors wife. To this day we all miss him because he was just that kind of person.
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#9
RE: This is really getting old.
(06-03-2019, 03:59 PM)GrammaBear Wrote: My next door neighbor, who was a career police officer, took a ride on his motorcycle with his wife one Saturday afternoon.  He and his wife often rode in our rural neighborhood just for the sheer pleasure of riding and having some fresh air.  Less than 5 miles from home a pickup truck ran a stop sign because he said he didn't see any harm because no one was coming.  Because he ran that stop sign, he hit and killed my neighbor who was just 2 weeks from retirement after 25 years on the force.  He also permanently injured my neighbors wife.  To this day we all miss him because he was just that kind of person.

Motorcyclists, those who have ridden for many years, know that they are invisible to most motorists in cars and trucks. Knowing that, they have to place that burden on themselves, accept that responsibility, and ride accordingly. 

During my career, I responded to countless motorcycle vs. car accidents. The outcomes were varied. One thing that did stand out, was the fact that the motorists were to blame over 90% of the time. The most common excuse was......I didn't see the motorcycle. 

From the very moment you rise out of bed and get up for the day, there is no guarantee that you'll be going back to bed that night. Even though the odds are in your favor that you will, it can be a crap shoot at best sometimes, if for no other reason, the negligence of others.
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