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To humdify or not to Humidify!!!
#11
The function of the upper respiratory tract is to warm and humidify inhaled air to near body temperature an 100% humidity by the time it reaches the aveoli in the lungs. Depending on the ambient air, this can take considerable heat and moisture that the body must provide with each breath. Using CPAP, the upper respiratory tract does work fairly normally to supply this heat and moisture need, however most individuals, especially in cooler and dryer climates find added humidity is more comfortable. In ventilation patients, the heat and humidity is vital.

In short, you may not need humidification in a high humidity, warm climate, however if you use air conditioning the relative humidity and absolute temperature are lower. The function of the humidifier is to bring the temperature up to about 80 degrees F and increase relative humidity; it does not do all the work of raising temperature to 98 degrees F and 100% humidity.

Do what feels good, but humidity serves an important function in comfort, and can help prevent irritation that cold lead to illness or injury in cases where the respiratory tract cannot provide the needed conditioning. A search on keywords: humidification mechanical noninvasive ventilation, should yield a lot of results. https://www.google.com/search?q=humidifi...8&oe=utf-8
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#12
Right now, humidifier is on auto. Once it is warm enough that I leave the windows open at night, I shut off the humidifier until Fall heat is back on. If we have a string of very hot, humid nights, then I might turn the humidifier on again since the A/c quickly dries the air, but otherwise, I was just getting congested sinus'. I also switch from the heated hose to the Slimline hose. It's a mileage varies with each person thing. During a free shipping sale at one of the suppliers', I bought the side panel for my machine so I can just take the humidifier out.
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#13
I dont have a humidifier option. Do you mean climate control?

I cant seem to find it.
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#14
Yes, Climate Control is exactly right. You can leave it on auto (the sensor for it is on the mask end of your heated hose so make sure that isn't under the blanket!) or switch to manual and you can do the setting yourself (I think it's 1-5 where 5 is the most humidity). You can also turn it to OFF.
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#15
I use distilled water in mine, less than $1 for a gallon and no mineral buildup. In the winter I set it at 2 on my Remstar M+ and in the summer months I keep the reservoir filled and let it passively release moisture. I have not hooked up my new to me Aircurve 10 so I don't know how I will run it yet.
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#16
HI,

I am doing some traveling and don't want to take the water/humidifier with me since I don't use it.

How do I find the piece you bought?

Thanks.
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#17
(05-07-2017, 03:27 PM)Matzaball2016 Wrote: HI,

I am doing some traveling and don't want to take the water/humidifier with me since I don't use it.

How do I find the piece you bought?

Thanks.

Do a search for CPAP Heat Moisture Exchanger HME. it should be attached inline near the mask.
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#18
I think I found it.

Is this the piece that I need?

Commercial Link Removed, instead search Supplier #3, ResMed AirSense 10 Cpap Side Panel

Charcoal - 37303 - My machine is black.

Thanks









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#19
I have found that I am much more comfortable using a humidifier set to supply quite a high level. My machine does not have a heated hose, but I use an insulated hose cover, and although the climate here in Western Kentucky is usually quite humid I experience far less nasal congestion when I use the humidifier. Ordinarily I us about 8 or 10 oz.of water (270 ml) in a 6 hour sleep period. And I try to always have a supply of Wal-Mart distilled water on hand. I do realize that some users do not prefer much humidity, but that is an individual choice.

TheDuke
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#20
Yes, that is exactly what you want to order. Works slick too. Disables the humidifer functions so you don't have to be scrolling through unnecessary details.

I totally agree about using distilled water because it reduces the need for cleaning your humidifier bin, but remember, in a pinch, use whatever is drinkable. When you get home, just put in some vinegar and voila, no more sediment. I had trouble getting distilled water in a rural area without going 28 miles (one way, I kid you not), so just made do with the water in the house and cleaned the bin when I got home. Looks pristine. Some people have been told that it is a health reason why you are supposed to use distilled water. That is NOT TRUE. It is only to ease cleaning and lengthening the life of your humidifier bin.
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