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Traveling and CPAP machines
#1
Traveling and CPAP machines
My wife and I have been retired since early 2010. We are at a stage in life that we rarely need to travel any more. If we do, it's to go visit family. 

I despise flying commercial. Always have! If I NEVER have to fly commercial again in my life, it will STILL be too soon. From start to finish, it's a royal PITA.  

Excluding any emergency, we travel via automobile. I haven't had to travel anywhere since starting on my CPAP in early Sept. Traveling by auto, and taking my CPAP machine with me won't be an issue at all. 

My question is this. I know everyone is different, but I don't see my OSA as being so serious, that I need to take it with me on short trips, lasting only a few days or so. 

If I happen to take a nap (rarely) during the day, I don't use my CPAP. If we were to go somewhere upwards of a week or longer, then yes, I would take my machine along. 

I've seen some posts on here in regards to mini-CPAP's. I've also seen posts about having a spare machine on hand. I haven't considered acquiring a spare machine. Or, one designed specifically for traveling. 

The way I see it, if I have to sleep a couple of nights w/o a machine, it's no big deal. Am I incorrect thinking like that? Or, is my situation just not as severe as others? 

I'm just curious as to what I'm feeling, as all of this is still very new to me. This forum has been very helpful and I do value the thoughts, opinions, views, and guidance of others.
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#2
RE: Traveling and CPAP machines
One of the chief outcomes of apnea is daytime drowsiness - exactly what you don't want if you're driving long distances. If you take a micronap at the wheel, you could put your own life in danger, as well as your wife and people around you.

Personally I wouldn't want to share the road with somebody who needs apnea treatment but has let it go for a few days while they go on a driving vacation.
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INFORMATION ON APNEA BOARD FORUMS OR ON APNEABOARD.COM SHOULD NOT BE CONSIDERED AS MEDICAL ADVICE. ALWAYS SEEK THE ADVICE OF A PHYSICIAN BEFORE SEEKING TREATMENT FOR MEDICAL CONDITIONS, INCLUDING SLEEP APNEA. INFORMATION POSTED ON THE APNEA BOARD WEB SITE AND FORUMS ARE PERSONAL OPINION ONLY AND NOT NECESSARILY A STATEMENT OF FACT.
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#3
RE: Traveling and CPAP machines
(11-30-2018, 10:46 PM)DeepBreathing Wrote: One of the chief outcomes of apnea is daytime drowsiness - exactly what you don't want if you're driving long distances. If you take a micronap at the wheel, you could put your own life in danger, as well as your wife and people around you.

Personally I wouldn't want to share the road with somebody who needs apnea treatment but has let it go for a few days while they go on a driving vacation.

I can and do understand your concerns. But, my apnea is not the kind that I find myself falling asleep involuntarily. That issue has never been a concern for me. 

I was a police officer for 30 yrs. A very good portion of those years included working the midnight shift. Many shifts were 12 hrs. or longer at times. The entire 30 yrs. consisted of working rotating shifts. The longest shift rotation was one week. 

Falling asleep at unexpected / inopportune times wasn't a problem.......ever. I've heard of the problem though that others deal with.
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#4
RE: Traveling and CPAP machines
If you skip a few nights at home do you notice a difference?

I don't like the idea of long drives if I miss a night.

It's really no big deal to take the CPAP in a car. The hardest part is finding an electric outlet on your preferred side of the bed. During the day I tuck the CPAP, hose, and washed and dried mask into the travel bag. Then I set that under the night stand or on a dresser.

Flying can be a pain. I carry on, so it's one more thing I have to drag around.
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#5
RE: Traveling and CPAP machines
(11-30-2018, 11:17 PM)KSMatthew Wrote: If you skip a few nights at home do you notice a difference?

I don't like the idea of long drives if I miss a night.

It's really no big deal to take the CPAP in a car.  The hardest part is finding an electric outlet on your preferred side of the bed.  During the day I tuck the CPAP, hose, and washed and dried mask into the travel bag.  Then I set that under the night stand or on a dresser.

Flying can be a pain.  I carry on, so it's one more thing I have to drag around.

I started using my CPAP on Sept. 10th of this year. I've used it every night since. I didn't even know I had sleep apnea until I took a sleep test. 

My issue was my breathing stopped often during my sleep. 60-70 times per hour. I plan on using it every night while at home. I use it from the time I go to bed until I get up for the day. The transition of getting used to it has been very smooth and seamless for me. 

You are right. It's not a big deal to take it in a car when traveling. When I do that, I plan on taking an extension cord along as well, to make plugging it into an inconvenient wall outlet all that much easier.
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#6
RE: Traveling and CPAP machines
Hiya Big Guy

Now with renewed energy with treated apnea, I travel at least twice a year flying out of the country. We are allowed to carry on our CPAP machine as an extra due to it being a medical equipment. Yes, it is a fag but my alertness whilst on holiday is even more important to me. I want to enjoy my well earned holiday.

I believe AHI of 60-70 is severe as defined. Its not just a case of the risks to your life and others when you are on the road but you are also putting your long term health in danger by knowingly not treating your apnea.

The autoset packs away neatly in its bag. Have to say, I am not embarrassed by using the resmed bag but have never come across another at all in the last 2 years. Cannot believe there is no other sufferer passing through European airports in the last 2 years. Others must do a better job of being discreet.
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INFORMATION ON APNEA BOARD FORUMS OR ON APNEABOARD.COM SHOULD NOT BE CONSIDERED AS MEDICAL ADVICE. ALWAYS SEEK THE ADVICE OF A PHYSICIAN BEFORE SEEKING TREATMENT FOR MEDICAL CONDITIONS, INCLUDING SLEEP APNEA. INFORMATION POSTED ON THE APNEA BOARD WEB SITE AND FORUMS ARE PERSONAL OPINION ONLY AND NOT NECESSARILY A STATEMENT OF FACT.
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#7
RE: Traveling and CPAP machines
You seem like the kind of guy that knows how to live by the Boy Scout motto, Be Prepared. It is no problem to take your CPAP along in the car, so do that. If you want or need it, it will be there. If it makes you feel adventurous to do without, that is your choice. While traveling with your wife, you might consider if your sleep is the only thing possibly disrupted, or if your snoring without the therapy disrupts her sleep as well. Smile
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#8
RE: Traveling and CPAP machines
(12-01-2018, 09:15 AM)Sleeprider Wrote: You seem like the kind of guy that knows how to live by the Boy Scout motto, Be Prepared.  It is no problem to take your CPAP along in the car, so do that.  If you want or need it, it will be there.  If it makes you feel adventurous to do without, that is your choice.  While traveling with your wife, you might consider if your sleep is the only thing possibly disrupted, or if your snoring without the therapy disrupts her sleep as well.  Smile

Good point in regards to the snoring. I used  to do that. Now, since using my CPAP, I am a silent sleeper. My wife is very grateful. 

As some of you have mentioned, it's not a big deal to take it along on car trips. I plan on doing that. 

Thanks to all for the responses.
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#9
RE: Traveling and CPAP machines
I'll Ditto others. Better to take it whether you choose to use it or not. IMO it's better to have it along than to have not brought it wishing you did.
Dave

I'm not a doctor in real or fictional life. My posts include opinions based upon user experience regarding CPAP therapy and should not be considered medically professional direction or advice. Even a 1,000 mile trip requires a good first step. My recommended first steps include getting good walking shoes, 1 great cup of coffee, and a good GPS.

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#10
RE: Traveling and CPAP machines
(12-01-2018, 12:15 AM)Big Guy Wrote:
(11-30-2018, 11:17 PM)KSMatthew Wrote: If you skip a few nights at home do you notice a difference?

I don't like the idea of long drives if I miss a night.

It's really no big deal to take the CPAP in a car.  The hardest part is finding an electric outlet on your preferred side of the bed.  During the day I tuck the CPAP, hose, and washed and dried mask into the travel bag.  Then I set that under the night stand or on a dresser.

Flying can be a pain.  I carry on, so it's one more thing I have to drag around.

I started using my CPAP on Sept. 10th of this year. I've used it every night since. I didn't even know I had sleep apnea until I took a sleep test. 

My issue was my breathing stopped often during my sleep. 60-70 times per hour. I plan on using it every night while at home. I use it from the time I go to bed until I get up for the day. The transition of getting used to it has been very smooth and seamless for me. 

You are right. It's not a big deal to take it in a car when traveling. When I do that, I plan on taking an extension cord along as well, to make plugging it into an inconvenient wall outlet all that much easier.

Something to think about:  You are getting used to the CPAP, your body is getting adjusted to it, and your sleep debt getting repaid.  Pick a weekend when you don't have anything else going on and skip a couple nights - you'll quickly see the results and get to know how you will respond to the sudden onset of apneas.

I suspect I had apnea for many years before I was diagnosed and started CPAP.  Since then, maybe 15 yrs (?), I only miss a few days a year.  2 nights because I camp outside, and any others whenever I have a cold or other sinus problem and can't breathe through my nose.  I'll take the CPAP with me on any road trip.  It's a pain to haul it around even in the car, but it's a small price for the benefits.

I don't take an extension cord - more and more motels are adding bedside lamps that have outlets built into the base.  So many people now want convenient cell-phone charging locations that hotels are being more accommodating.  Still, you can run into the case where there is a single outlet next to the bed and it's taken with some combination of desk lamp, floor lamp, and clock radio.  The first thing I do is look for the best outlet and make the bed selection based on that.  The bigger problem is where to set it during the night - I tend to put it on the floor, setting it on the carry bag or phone book so it stays off the carpet.  If possible, I'll set it on the lower open shelf of the nightstand.
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