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Traveling with CPAP
#31
(06-01-2015, 10:20 AM)OMyMyOHellYes Wrote: If I were you , I would NOT use humidification onboard the aircraft. It may draw more power than the in seat plugs are designed to handle ( some are limited to around 50-60 watts) and more importantly, in flying an aircraft, sometimes weird G-forces can be encountered that might slosh water back into the blower unit and that is a bad thing. Think turbulence.

OMMOHY

Nah. Any laptop I've owned for many years has the same 90 watt switching power supply a CPAP machine has. If the plane has AC power outlets, it won't be a problem. I've used my CPAP machine aboard an airplane. If there is enough turbulence that I'd worry about the water in the humidifier sloshing around, I'd just power it down and remove the tank. It's a jet. It's not like bouncing around in a Skyhawk or a Cherokee.

I don't understand all the fretting about flying with a CPAP machine. Mine fits just fine in my roll-aboard. The TSA security people see them constantly on the X-Ray machine conveyer belt. If I have a lousy boarding number, I just tell the gate agent I have medical equipment in my roll-aboard I'm not willing to gate check and ask to board early. Nobody is going to refuse that request.

It requires a bit more planning on a small turboprop. I toss a spare canvas bag in my roll aboard, put the CPAP machine & accessories in that bag at the gate, gate-check my roll-aboard, and carry my CPAP machine and laptop aboard.

I fly enough on business that I never ever check bags unless it's a gate check on a turboprop where they hand the bag to me on the ramp at my destination.
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#32
Yep. I just put it into a bin, the bag in another, send it through the xray. No big deal. Like Geoff said, they see them all the time. I have more trouble with my 17" laptop than I do my CPAP. Every once in a while I get an agent who won't believe it is a real laptop because it is so big. They always turn it on or send it through twice. Or both.

Anyway, it is easy and simple. Take your time, be polite, watch the process as you approach, nothing to it.
PaulaO2
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Breathe deeply and count to zen.

INFORMATION ON APNEA BOARD FORUMS OR ON APNEABOARD.COM SHOULD NOT BE CONSIDERED AS MEDICAL ADVICE. ALWAYS SEEK THE ADVICE OF A PHYSICIAN BEFORE SEEKING TREATMENT FOR MEDICAL CONDITIONS, INCLUDING SLEEP APNEA. INFORMATION POSTED ON THE APNEA BOARD WEB SITE AND FORUMS ARE PERSONAL OPINION ONLY AND NOT NECESSARILY A STATEMENT OF FACT.




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#33
(05-29-2015, 03:14 PM)DariaVader Wrote:
(05-29-2015, 02:27 PM)PaulaO2 Wrote: No way in heck would I put my CPAP in my luggage. I'm not talking about it getting lost, I'm talking about it getting busted. Or, worse, it showing up on the xray and they pulling it to examine then not putting the suitcase back together right and then it getting busted. Airplane cargo holds are being crammed to the gills. And unless you have a hard sided suitcase, that CPAP is getting pushed on, shoved on, etc.

not only that, but last time I flew, my bags showed up drenched everything inside was sopping wet. Sucked for my clothes... but at least I had chosen to stay at a hotel with laundry facilities, and had packed durable washable items. Really happy my CPAP was not exposed to that!

How about the number of TSA agents who have been caught stealing from checked luggage? Any lock you have on your checked luggage must be such that the TSA can open it. A bunch of thieves have your luggage key! Not that they would want to steal your CPAP but incidental loss or damage is possible.

Drifting off topic, a news story today tells of an internal test by the agency itself, on how well the TSA catches explosives and weapons. Test subjects posing as passengers tried to sneak these items past TSA agents at airports. The TSA agents failed to spot them, 95% of the time.
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#34
That's why I don't even bother with locks. If I have something I don't want stolen or messed with, it goes with me. Or I ship it ahead of time.
PaulaO2
Apnea Board Moderator
www.ApneaBoard.com


Breathe deeply and count to zen.

INFORMATION ON APNEA BOARD FORUMS OR ON APNEABOARD.COM SHOULD NOT BE CONSIDERED AS MEDICAL ADVICE. ALWAYS SEEK THE ADVICE OF A PHYSICIAN BEFORE SEEKING TREATMENT FOR MEDICAL CONDITIONS, INCLUDING SLEEP APNEA. INFORMATION POSTED ON THE APNEA BOARD WEB SITE AND FORUMS ARE PERSONAL OPINION ONLY AND NOT NECESSARILY A STATEMENT OF FACT.




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#35
I have never carried documentation with my machine on any flight (including an international flight recently). TSA knows what a CPAP machine is, and it varies as to whether you have to remove the machine from the bag or not. Sometimes they want me to, other times not. Though, come to think of it, since I got signed up for PreCheck, I never have to remove it. Australia's equivalent of TSA didn't bat an eyelash or require me to remove it either.

And no flight attendants have hassled me about it, either. I think they all know what a CPAP machine is also. And I think they'll take your word for it that it's necessary medical equipment without documentation.

I NEVER check the machine. And I always carry my prescription meds with me as well. I have, unfortunately, had luggage lost (temporarily, thank goodness). I never check valuables of any kind. The CPAP is an expensive machine and baggage handlers are gorillas. Especially when traveling internationally, never check anything that you cannot live without for a night or two. That's just common sense to me.
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#36
(06-01-2015, 04:55 PM)GeoffD Wrote:
(06-01-2015, 10:20 AM)OMyMyOHellYes Wrote: If I were you , I would NOT use humidification onboard the aircraft. It may draw more power than the in seat plugs are designed to handle ( some are limited to around 50-60 watts) and more importantly, in flying an aircraft, sometimes weird G-forces can be encountered that might slosh water back into the blower unit and that is a bad thing. Think turbulence.

OMMOHY

Nah. Any laptop I've owned for many years has the same 90 watt switching power supply a CPAP machine has. If the plane has AC power outlets, it won't be a problem. I've used my CPAP machine aboard an airplane. If there is enough turbulence that I'd worry about the water in the humidifier sloshing around, I'd just power it down and remove the tank. It's a jet. It's not like bouncing around in a Skyhawk or a Cherokee.

Do not, I repeat, Do Not put water in your cpap humidifier if you are using it during flight! That is akin to playing Russian Roulette with your expensive equipment!

I am a retired airline pilot, and I have had way too many encounters with CAT (Clear Air Turbulence) to ignore the potential risk to your machine if you have water in it.........it's just a matter of time before you would regret that practice.

Just ask my copilot that was pinned to the ceiling of the cockpit with no warning on a beautiful clear night at 41,000' because he was dumb enough not to be belted in his seat. All I could do was look straight up at him and laugh.
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#37
From my 560P manual:

Traveling with the System
When traveling, the carrying case is for carry-on luggage only. The carrying case will not protect the system if it is put through checked baggage.
For your convenience at security stations, there is a note on the bottom of the device stating that it is medical equipment and is suitable for airline use. It may be helpful to bring this manual along with you to help security personnel understand the REMstar Auto A-Flex device.
If you are traveling to a country with a line voltage different than the one you are currently using, a different power cord or an international plug adaptor may be required to make your power cord compatible with the power outlets of the country to which you are traveling. Contact your home care provider for additional information.

Airline Travel
The REMstar Auto A-Flex device is suitable for use on airlines when the device is operating from an AC or DC power source.
Note: It is not suitable for airline use with any of the modems or humidifiers installed in the unit.
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#38
From Airsense clinical manual:

[Image: image.jpg1_7.jpg]
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#39
(06-01-2015, 04:55 PM)GeoffD Wrote:
(06-01-2015, 10:20 AM)OMyMyOHellYes Wrote: If I were you , I would NOT use humidification onboard the aircraft. It may draw more power than the in seat plugs are designed to handle ( some are limited to around 50-60 watts) and more importantly, in flying an aircraft, sometimes weird G-forces can be encountered that might slosh water back into the blower unit and that is a bad thing. Think turbulence.

OMMOHY

Nah. Any laptop I've owned for many years has the same 90 watt switching power supply a CPAP machine has. If the plane has AC power outlets, it won't be a problem. I've used my CPAP machine aboard an airplane. If there is enough turbulence that I'd worry about the water in the humidifier sloshing around, I'd just power it down and remove the tank. It's a jet. It's not like bouncing around in a Skyhawk or a Cherokee.

I actually kind of enjoy moderate turbulence. And yes, in a light AC you get it a lot, especially in summer. But I have also been on a B747-400, mid Pacific, and hit turbulence so bad that had I not been belted, I would have been thrown around the cabin. Nobody seriously hurt - but folks up and about the cabin did fall. No warning. No WX to report in the area.

OMMOHY
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#40
Flying military (E-# AWACS nav) I saw turbulence so bad I had black and blues from my shoulder harness from being thrown around. We got caught in some light turbulence that rapidly went to severe and we were trying to get out of it. I pitied the backend crew and how they were getting bounced around.

I always fly with my seatbelt on.

Homer
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