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Weight Gain From Water Retention
#11
(08-05-2015, 03:14 PM)DariaVader Wrote: Good thread on the subject of CPAP causing water retention: http://www.apneaboard.com/forums/Thread-...-retention


DariaVader...Thanks for the link!
Very interesting and informative.
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#12
(08-05-2015, 05:52 PM)eseedhouse Wrote:
(08-04-2015, 09:16 PM)Louis R. Wrote: I have no intentions in continuous self-prescribing but I did take one today out of desperation... I was major bloated, even breathing was difficult when I bent over.

If it were me I'd have gone to the emergency ward of the nearest hospital right quick.

Ed,
I would have gone to the emergency room if I would have had more symptoms along with the bloating. My wife gave me one of her Lasix and it did the trick by eliminating the retention. Let me explain further since you took the time to address my bloating problem and have made suggestions.
I am a month shy of 61... but thank God I don't suffer from any known medical ailments other than our battle with OSA. With the exception of an occasional elevated blood glucose, my blood pressure, blood work, lungs, heart and other organs are good (knock on wood).
Also, my lovely wife who has had the misfortune of suffering from kidney disease (Lupus nephritis), is my source of an amazing amount of medical knowledge. Besides, she works for a major residency program in plastic surgery and is able to get a lot of medical opinion... I've gone to have lunch with her and have had courtesy impromptu doctor's visits.
However, I do think that this retention problem needs to be addressed and diagnosed (by doctors) before it gets worse. Ironically, on Monday I called the sleep doctor's office and then again Tuesday to tell him what is happening and I still haven't been contacted. It's tempting to self medicate: huh:

As always, I am very appreciative of this forum's comments and concerns and I welcome your input. I will post any developments when available... THANKS

LOU

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#13
(08-05-2015, 03:14 PM)DariaVader Wrote: Good thread on the subject of CPAP causing water retention: http://www.apneaboard.com/forums/Thread-...-retention

Yes Vader... but I'm a bit surprised that there haven't been more folks with the same experience. By the way, on my first go around with a BiPAP and now with the CPAP I'm getting the same water retention problem.???

Thanks!
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#14
If you don't get CA from it, max out your EPR. Perhaps when on bilevel you did not have pressure support dialed high enough? There have been several folk who have issue - however seems that the majority do not. Mine is getting somewhat better after 9 months of treatment, maxing EPR and increasing diuretic med.

and..... get a full workup on other causes! you might be borderline somewhere and thoracic pressure increase knocked you over a line.
هههههه هههههه هههههه هههههه هههههه هههههه هههههه هههههه هههههه هههههه هههههه هههههه هههههه هههههه
Tongue Suck Technique for prevention of mouth breathing:
  • Place your tongue behind your front teeth on the roof of your mouth
  • let your tongue fill the space between the upper molars
  • gently suck to form a light vacuum
Practising during the day can help you to keep it at night

هههههه هههههه هههههه هههههه هههههه هههههه هههههه هههههه هههههه هههههه هههههه هههههه هههههه هههههه
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#15
(08-06-2015, 11:23 AM)DariaVader Wrote: get a full workup on other causes! you might be borderline somewhere and thoracic pressure increase knocked you over a line.
The "borderline" thing may be a factor, so it should be determined with blood work and a diagnosis. The rest of what you say is Chinese to me... I'm still in kindergarten with all this stuff. Furthermore, I still haven't succeeded in downloading Sleeyhead.... got to go back and try again when I have some time (from the honey do's). Cool

Thanks... LOU

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#16
After getting Doc to verify there is no other reason... the bottom line to fixing the CPAP induced issue is sufficient pressure relief on exhale. A-flex = 3 is the max you can get with your APAP. A Bipap will allow you to set IPAP (Breathe in) and EPAP (Breathe out) separately. Subtracting EPAP from IPAP is the amount of pressure relief. Means you breathe out against less incoming pressure.

The changing pressures causes some folk to have CPAP induced complex apnea, and the need for pressure relief must be avaluated against the sleep architecture to get the best therapy for YOU.
هههههه هههههه هههههه هههههه هههههه هههههه هههههه هههههه هههههه هههههه هههههه هههههه هههههه هههههه
Tongue Suck Technique for prevention of mouth breathing:
  • Place your tongue behind your front teeth on the roof of your mouth
  • let your tongue fill the space between the upper molars
  • gently suck to form a light vacuum
Practising during the day can help you to keep it at night

هههههه هههههه هههههه هههههه هههههه هههههه هههههه هههههه هههههه هههههه هههههه هههههه هههههه هههههه
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#17
(08-06-2015, 12:42 PM)DariaVader Wrote: A Bipap will allow you to set IPAP (Breathe in) and EPAP (Breathe out) separately. Subtracting EPAP from IPAP is the amount of pressure relief. Means you breathe out against less incoming pressure.

The changing pressures causes some folk to have CPAP induced complex apnea, and the need for pressure relief must be avaluated against the sleep architecture to get the best therapy for YOU.

Yes, I had figured that BiPAP allowed for exhaling by dropping the pressure. And, can I safely assume that the magic combination of machine and settings comes from trail and error (both with the doctor and ourselves) tweaking things. I guess that in the end (but before the pearly gates) what we will get is an optimized xPAP therapy, or a variety of "NDE's" Oh-jeez When we see the white light we'll know for sure.

And is Lasix ultimately going to be a daily med for me to take??
On Aug. 20th I guess I will know when I see the doc.

Thank you Daria.
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#18
(08-06-2015, 02:05 PM)Louis R. Wrote:
(08-06-2015, 12:42 PM)DariaVader Wrote: A Bipap will allow you to set IPAP (Breathe in) and EPAP (Breathe out) separately. Subtracting EPAP from IPAP is the amount of pressure relief. Means you breathe out against less incoming pressure.

The changing pressures causes some folk to have CPAP induced complex apnea, and the need for pressure relief must be avaluated against the sleep architecture to get the best therapy for YOU.

Yes, I had figured that BiPAP allowed for exhaling by dropping the pressure. And, can I safely assume that the magic combination of machine and settings comes from trail and error (both with the doctor and ourselves) tweaking things. I guess that in the end (but before the pearly gates) what we will get is an optimized xPAP therapy, or a variety of "NDE's" Oh-jeez When we see the white light we'll know for sure.

And is Lasix ultimately going to be a daily med for me to take??
On Aug. 20th I guess I will know when I see the doc.

Thank you Daria.

Good morning,
Last time you weighed in on the weight gain issue you spoke about the problem regarding thoracic pressure with CPAP, and that you were considering BiPAP.
Since my post in August, and with the slowly upward weight gain, I've had appointments with my sleep doctor and my primary doctor. Both say that there is no medical studies indicating a link between CPAP and weigh gain. They suggested blood work and I had it with no existing problems found. Basically I wasted time going to see them.
The sleep doctor said to stop using the machine to see if my weight goes down but that will cause me to suffer the original severe OSA.
He also said to go to a dentist and maybe try a MAD mouth piece. Dentist made devices are very expensive and insurance doesn't cover it... so I bought an inexpensive SNORE RX ($99) brand on-line and I got it yesterday. After boiling it and biting for fitting purposes I found it very tight when I went to sleep and aborted it's use, so I will try again tonight re-boiling and refitting.
Other than a daily Glucophage I'm taking one Lasix a week.
All I know is that the weight gain has continued, and it is very stressful (an understatement) for me and for my concerned wife.
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#19
Is your Cpap pressure sub-optimal? One theory that can potentially explain the water retention is if your Cpap pressure is not keeping your O2 level steady(even though AHI may look good). If your O2 is dropping multiple times, your heart has to work really hard to transport oxygen to all body parts and water removal gets de-prioritized, leading to edema (especially in limb extremities).

Easy initial fix to try would be switch on aflex to 3, and move your apap range from 4-8 to 6-10. Then you may also want to check your spo2 using an overnight pulse oximeter.

If O2 is dropping still, then next step is get a bilevel machine with more pressure support.

My 2 cents. YMMV. You may want to talk this with your physician.
Reply


#20
(09-09-2015, 09:12 AM)Louis R. Wrote: Good morning,
Last time you weighed in on the weight gain issue you spoke about the problem regarding thoracic pressure with CPAP, and that you were considering BiPAP.
Since my post in August, and with the slowly upward weight gain, I've had appointments with my sleep doctor and my primary doctor. Both say that there is no medical studies indicating a link between CPAP and weigh gain. They suggested blood work and I had it with no existing problems found. Basically I wasted time going to see them.
The sleep doctor said to stop using the machine to see if my weight goes down but that will cause me to suffer the original severe OSA.
He also said to go to a dentist and maybe try a MAD mouth piece. Dentist made devices are very expensive and insurance doesn't cover it... so I bought an inexpensive SNORE RX ($99) brand on-line and I got it yesterday. After boiling it and biting for fitting purposes I found it very tight when I went to sleep and aborted it's use, so I will try again tonight re-boiling and refitting.
Other than a daily Glucophage I'm taking one Lasix a week.
All I know is that the weight gain has continued, and it is very stressful (an understatement) for me and for my concerned wife.

Louis: Do you have a cardiologist? Given your age and sleep apnea, it is wise to consult a cardiologist and have a workup. Such as echocardiogram or SPECT scan under exercise.
INFORMATION ON APNEA BOARD FORUMS OR ON APNEABOARD.COM SHOULD NOT BE CONSIDERED AS MEDICAL ADVICE. ALWAYS SEEK THE ADVICE OF A PHYSICIAN BEFORE SEEKING TREATMENT FOR MEDICAL CONDITIONS, INCLUDING SLEEP APNEA. INFORMATION POSTED ON THE APNEA BOARD WEB SITE AND FORUMS ARE PERSONAL OPINION ONLY AND NOT NECESSARILY A STATEMENT OF FACT.
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