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Weight Question
#1
I've been reading about how weight loss, or the lack of being able to lose weight, is difficult due to disrupted sleep.

Question for all the seasoned "Pappers." ...taking out most of the other variables, do you find it easier to lose weight now after having successful apnea therapy vs before therapy? I know there are many other factors that go hand in hand with weight reduction; motivation, energy, etc.

After 3 days on cpap therapy, I already feel like a new person and can not remember EVER waking up at 5:30 AM WITH 8 hours of sleep and feeling this fantastic! I just want to jump on the treadmill and get going. Was hoping that in real life vs what I have been reading, that the reports are true about how much easier it is to lose weight.
A good laugh and a long sleep are the best cures....
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#2
In my case, weight loss is a frame of mind. The only way I can lose weight and keep it off is to exercise/cycle. Being on CPAP therapy for so long, I have no memory of what it was like to attempt to lose weight before - or even if I attempted to do so. oldman Sorry!
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#3
It stands to reason that if you're feeling better and have more energy, you're likely to be more active and burn more calories. That will translate into weight loss unless of course, you use your new found energy on more trips to the fridge... Nonosign
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#4
(04-13-2014, 09:41 AM)JimZZZ Wrote: It stands to reason that if you're feeling better and have more energy, you're likely to be more active and burn more calories. That will translate into weight loss unless of course, you use your new found energy on more trips to the fridge... Nonosign

Ha, yeah! I need to put a padlock on it with all the extra energy. Or better yet, channel that energy into a more intelligent, weight loss endeavor!
A good laugh and a long sleep are the best cures....
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#5
I think I once read about a hormone imbalance or something that arises from inadequate sleep. Leptin maybe? I'll have to research it again.

A good laugh and a long sleep are the best cures....
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#6
Sleep is essential to proper hormonal regulation... especially cortisol.
Losing weight with untreated apnea can be difficult to impossible.

In the absence of other factors, like say, diabetes, it may be possible that the re-regulation of cortisol combined with the extra energy of being well rested will result in weight loss without much effort.

It is my sincere hope that will happen for you. Live long and prosper!
[Image: 1F4m9Ift.jpg]
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#7
(04-13-2014, 08:24 AM)Stargazer Wrote: I've been reading about how weight loss, or the lack of being able to lose weight, is difficult due to disrupted sleep.

I just want to jump on the treadmill and get going. Was hoping that in real life vs what I have been reading, that the reports are true about how much easier it is to lose weight.

I've always done an hour of elliptical, and more, even when lack of sleep made it impossible to function throughout a normal day. Maintaining weight and keeping motivated was impossible. My ankles and knees were becoming injured. The last eighteen months it was a losing battle.

With a month+ of CPAP behind me I can challenge myself with cross-training and turn up the resistance too. Again I enjoy the post exercise rush ... as opposed to struggling and trying to finish a session with minimal resistance. What a difference! For me the path of least effort is CPAP, moderate exercise, and monitoring carbs in my diet (with frequent postprandial testing).

Although early days for me, I can foresee weight control not being a major preoccupation and I can move on to a more productive use of my time.
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#8
(04-13-2014, 10:09 AM)justMongo Wrote: Sleep is essential to proper hormonal regulation... especially cortisol.
Losing weight with untreated apnea can be difficult to impossible.

In the absence of other factors, like say, diabetes, it may be possible that the re-regulation of cortisol combined with the extra energy of being well rested will result in weight loss without much effort.

It is my sincere hope that will happen for you. Live long and prosper!

Leptin and ghrelin were the hormones I was trying to remember. The more obese we get, the more leptin-resistant we get! From what I read, upon finally obtaining the required amounts of sleep, these two hormones supposedly begin to balance back out, aiding in the ability to better control hunger and lose weight if that's the goal.

Cortisol is important as well especially if/when we become stressed. Can't think of a time in my life these past years I was more stressed and most, if not all, have been because of inadequate sleep!

Hopefully, resistance is NOT futile and I will begin to break the reign of the out-of-control hunger hormones' grip!
A good laugh and a long sleep are the best cures....
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#9
(04-13-2014, 12:07 PM)Stargazer Wrote:
(04-13-2014, 10:09 AM)justMongo Wrote: Sleep is essential to proper hormonal regulation... especially cortisol.
Losing weight with untreated apnea can be difficult to impossible.

In the absence of other factors, like say, diabetes, it may be possible that the re-regulation of cortisol combined with the extra energy of being well rested will result in weight loss without much effort.

It is my sincere hope that will happen for you. Live long and prosper!

Leptin and ghrelin were the hormones I was trying to remember. The more obese we get, the more leptin-resistant we get! From what I read, upon finally obtaining the required amounts of sleep, these two hormones supposedly begin to balance back out, aiding in the ability to better control hunger and lose weight if that's the goal.

Cortisol is important as well especially if/when we become stressed. Can't think of a time in my life these past years I was more stressed and most, if not all, have been because of inadequate sleep!

Hopefully, resistance is NOT futile and I will begin to break the reign of the out-of-control hunger hormones' grip!

You are correct that Leptin and Ghrelin are involved in hunger.
Cortisol and high levels of circulating insulin are the culprits that create central obesity. Cortisol has a circadian (daily) rhythm to it that is disturbed when our sleep is disturbed. Lowering carbohydrate intake will lower levels of circulating insulin.

Most know exogenous insulin as often necessary to the diabetic. It also circulates in high levels in people who are centrally obese or who consume too much carbohydrate. It's a knife with a double edge. Necessary for blood glucose control; but, also a fat storage hormone. It signals fat storage; and makes release of fat from storage difficult.

[Image: 1F4m9Ift.jpg]
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#10
First week on PAP, felt better even with less than 4 hours sleeping and waking up on the hour. After the honeymoon is over or some might call it 'beginners luck' took a while to get back on tracks. IMO, 'how you feel' can be misleading guide because after being sick for many years, take a bit of medicine and you feel better but stay the course of the treatment and you,ll feel even better

As for weight loss, all about calories and the opposite of your bank balance ... red is good, black is bad while bank balance to be healthy ... red is bad, black is good (something like that) Coffee
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