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Weight gain
#31
Well, Sleepster, I guess I need a "head-ectomy" too. I have gained 5 lbs since starting treatment in January. I'm not eating any more that I ever did, and have actually cut out a lot of the junk I usually eat around the holidays, but I guess I may be underestimating what I actually consume, as well as how active I am. I'm sure I still haven't ramped up my activity enough, even though I'm not as tired during the day anymore...I think changing my habits will go a long way to get my motivation back to start exercising regularly. Trying to watch sugar in foods though. That diabetes/sleep apnea connection sounds interesting.
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#32
As others have postulated here weight gain or loss boils down to a simple formula once your apnea issue is well controlled. When the AHI is not controlled the cells do not get the proper oxygen saturation to work as intended and weight gain usually follows. I gained 20 pounds with untreated OSA and couldn't lose it. CPAP doesn't make you lose weight but it can create the proper environment for which to lose weight IF calories in are less than calories out. I've lost 5 pounds since starting CPAP therapy a month ago. More to follow hopefully.....
Coffee

Happy Pappin'
Never Give In, Never Give Up


INFORMATION ON APNEA BOARD FORUMS OR ON APNEABOARD.COM SHOULD NOT BE CONSIDERED AS MEDICAL ADVICE. ALWAYS SEEK THE ADVICE OF A PHYSICIAN BEFORE SEEKING TREATMENT FOR MEDICAL CONDITIONS, INCLUDING SLEEP APNEA. 
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#33
(05-31-2015, 04:46 AM)DocWils Wrote: For everyone - I is not the CPAP ultimately - it is how much you eat as opposed to how much you burn. The science on that is in. If you feel better you may have a healthier appetite, which might lead to weight gain, so just have a look at your caloric intake and outgo and stop hooking it on the therapy. It is nice and convenient to blame a little black box for your weight woes, but it is the little round hole that is the problem; stop trying to fill it and you will lose weight. Plain and simple. <SNIP>


After years of suffering from the devastating effects of sleep apnea now we gotta be blamed for overfilling the pie hole? I know first hand feeling bad compels me eat junk for the soothing effect of carb consumption. I had thought getting a good nights sleep would help reduce my cravings and in fact that seems to be the case. However if one has gained weight as have I and not materially changed one's caloric intake I would suggest you doc types look at the effect of adrenalin and fight or flight stress. When being choked all night with the resultant release of adrenalin to kick start your body your does not your metabolism increase? Does this carry into the day in the form of stress and anxiety? Would I be amiss thinking waking in a pool of sweat produced from my body's nightly battle to survive has got to burn a few extra calories? No more pounding of heart? Six trips to the head every night is now one or two? The days following night sweats were particular grueling. So yes absolutely calories in/calories out but perhaps an unexpected effect of cpap therapy may well be reduction in net calories burned? How about we inform new members a possible result of cpap therapy is weight gain? Forewarned is forearmed? I know my stress and anxiety levels have decreased. One need only look at my initial posts here to see I was a stressed out mess Dielaughing


I use my PAP machine nightly and I feel great!
Updated: Philips Respironics System One (60 Series)
RemStar BiPAP Auto with Bi-FlexModel 760P -
Rise Time x3 Fixed Bi-Level EPAP 9.0 IPAP 11.5 (cmH2O)
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#34
I only eat calorie removed foods. For instance, I have discovered that when you mix pecans into a pie, a chain reaction occurs that causes all the calories in the pie guts to evaporate. It's amazing when you think about it.
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#35
I found all the pounds that I lost.

If you want to check out studies, go do some internet searches on the subject. There may be a certain satisfaction and stress relief associated with the hormonal rebalancing that we gain from CPAP treatment.

When we swear we are eating less (though not tracking calories) and yet increase weight, it does give us cause to wonder if there are better and worse metabolic states we can be in, and the use of calories might change as those states change.

Anyway, hope I find ways to cope with my size, as it may also hold a key to future reduction of apneas.

Suggestions for those that do searches on the web, please consider adding "NIH" to the search as "{subject} NIH" filters out the non-study material and gives you more publically released studies to browse through.

I, for one, do not like getting my info from societyofpeoplethinkingmyway.pl who "say" something is true. I like to at least try to check it out. That's why I don't go to sites that sell the super sleep pill for my info.

I am glad to hear the perspectives of others on our wonderful apneaboard. It really helps to hear that others are seeking some of the same answers.

QAL
Dedicated to QALity sleep.
You'll note I am listed as an Advisory Member. I am honored to be listed as such. See the fine print - Advisory Members as a group provide advice and suggestions to Apnea Board administrators and staff concerning Apnea Board operation and administrative policies. Membership in the Advisory Member group should not be understood as in any way implying medical expertise or qualification for advising Sleep Apnea patients concerning their treatment.
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#36
(05-31-2015, 10:51 AM)Mark Douglas Wrote: However if one has gained weight as have I and not materially changed one's caloric intake I would suggest you doc types look at the effect of adrenalin and fight or flight stress. When being choked all night with the resultant release of adrenalin to kick start your body your does not your metabolism increase? Does this carry into the day in the form of stress and anxiety? Would I be amiss thinking waking in a pool of sweat produced from my body's nightly battle to survive has got to burn a few extra calories? No more pounding of heart? Six trips to the head every night is now one or two? The days following night sweats were particular grueling. So yes absolutely calories in/calories out but perhaps an unexpected effect of cpap therapy may well be reduction in net calories burned? How about we inform new members a possible result of cpap therapy is weight gain? Forewarned is forearmed?

My thinking, too.
Membership in the Advisory Member group should not be understood as in any way implying medical expertise or qualification for advising Sleep Apnea patients concerning their treatment. The Advisory Member group provides advice and suggestions to Apnea Board administrators and staff on matters concerning Apnea Board operation and administrative policies - not on matters concerning treatment for Sleep Apnea. I think it is now too late to change the name of the group but I think Voting Member group would perhaps have been a more descriptive name for the group.
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#37
You gain weight from only two things. Eating more calories than you are using OR edema. Now, medications such as prednisone can make you hungry and result in a significant weight gain (there is also edema - most visible in the face). As you age, you gain weight more easily.

However, if you are confident that you have not changed eating habits, then I would check in with your doctor for other problems. A 10 pound weight gain could be expected based on the comments here, but 20 pounds is a awful lot in a fairly short time for someone who isn't normally overweight. My sleep doc said roughly 40% of his patients actually lose weight once their sleep apnea is under control for a variety of reasons. He was not including any patients who had bariatric surgery in that estimate. I have a lot of pounds to lose and stopped losing not because I wasn't losing fat, but because I was gaining water in edema in my legs and the apnea was worsening dramatically.
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#38
(05-31-2015, 10:51 AM)Mark Douglas Wrote: I would suggest you doc types look at the effect of adrenalin and fight or flight stress.

We did - not sufficient a factor. End of story.

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#39
(05-31-2015, 10:51 AM)Mark Douglas Wrote: However if one has gained weight as have I and not materially changed one's caloric intake

How do you establish that? You could keep track of everything you eat, which includes weighing it to know how much of it you've eaten, and add up the calories. Or you could make an estimate. Most people estimate.
Sleepster
Apnea Board Moderator
www.ApneaBoard.com


INFORMATION ON APNEA BOARD FORUMS OR ON APNEABOARD.COM SHOULD NOT BE CONSIDERED AS MEDICAL ADVICE. ALWAYS SEEK THE ADVICE OF A PHYSICIAN BEFORE SEEKING TREATMENT FOR MEDICAL CONDITIONS, INCLUDING SLEEP APNEA. INFORMATION POSTED ON THE APNEA BOARD WEB SITE AND FORUMS ARE PERSONAL OPINION ONLY AND NOT NECESSARILY A STATEMENT OF FACT.
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#40
Do I record every morsel that crosses my lips? No.
I do however weigh myself daily under the same conditions. I allow the scale to zero each time and weigh myself twice to check for hysteresis in the scale. The scale records each measurement and compares to previous day and gives me the difference up or down. I record this on a calendar. My weight is much too high but very consistent over several years. There are seasonal trends and I am normally loosing weight this time of year not gaining. Now on cpap my weight is creeping up. Doc can say what he wants but the available data says I am gaining weight with no other changes in habit or diet. Furthermore this phenomena seems pretty common amongst our membership. Logic suggests if I am sleeping quietly instead of thrashing around, making trips to the head, upright and awake reading to calm my pounding heart, watching the box, I am likely burning less energy. Or if I sleep more hours I possibly have fewer active hours. Something has changed and cpap appears to be the catalyst.
.
After the engineers designed it, and the factory built it, I'm the guy who went out into the field and made it actually work in the real world - not in the lab. When what I see before me conflicts with what the 'book' says I don't assume I am blind. I look for errors in the book.
I use my PAP machine nightly and I feel great!
Updated: Philips Respironics System One (60 Series)
RemStar BiPAP Auto with Bi-FlexModel 760P -
Rise Time x3 Fixed Bi-Level EPAP 9.0 IPAP 11.5 (cmH2O)
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