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Weight loss - at what point would a cure kick in?
#1
Weight loss - at what point would a cure kick in?
I lost 20 lbs (I'm now 180lbs, 5'10" and about 18% body-fat). I have "mild OSA" according to the Registered Portable Monitoring" mail-in sleep study I did last week. I didn't do a test at the higher weight - but self diagnosed based on symptoms and Oximeter readings.

Would it follow that if I lost another 10 or even 20 lbs, I might come in as cured? I wouldn't mind being thinner (although the 20lbs was very hard to lose).

I guess I'm really wondering what the limits are with the relationship between weight and apnea.
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#2
RE: Weight loss - at what point would a cure kick in?
I would think that everyone is different.

I am currently listening to a neurologist's presentation regarding her experience with Vitamin D, B12, and sleep apnea. She mentions that many of her patients (with sleep apnea) are not overweight. I've heard this before from other sources but cannot recall specifically where.

My own father probably has sleep apnea (loud snoring, visibly stops breathing) and has never been overweight. Same with my son, although he was overweight for a time and his weight can fluctuate. Dont-know
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#3
RE: Weight loss - at what point would a cure kick in?
I think losing weight helps to a point. But as you get older skin starts to sag and that can block your airway. Also dieting won't help if you have a narrow airway to start with. With mild Apnea and youth I'd say you could cure it short term if that was the only cause. But be prepared for it to come back later as you get older.
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#4
RE: Weight loss - at what point would a cure kick in?
We have members that are lean and fit, as well as many who are overweight. The stereotype that obstructive sleep apnea is correlated with weight is not entirely undeserved, but it is a fallacy that weight loss will result in diminished symptoms or remission. That is actually relatively rare. Your odds are better with mild apnea, compared to moderate or severe. Keeping weight off long-term is challenging, DAMHIK.
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#5
RE: Weight loss - at what point would a cure kick in?
Sometimes weight is not the only factor at play, there are other causes of sleep apnea.
The shape of the jaw and throat etc can also affect things.
So there is always a slim chance that loosing weight will not always cure Sleep Apnea, however, that is no reason why you should not give it every try.
There is a lot to be gained from loosing a bit of weight, if nothing you will probably feel a lot fitter not having to haul about the extra fat reserves.
So give it a go, yo may be one of the lucky ones.  I know a few that has lost weight and does not have Sleep Apnea anymore.
I am NOT a doctor.  I try to help, but do not take what I say as medical advice.


Every journey, however large or small starts with the first step.

Sleep-well
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#6
RE: Weight loss - at what point would a cure kick in?
(12-15-2017, 11:58 AM)Sleeprider Wrote: Keeping weight off long-term is challenging

Yes it is, it is more of a challenge than loosing it in the first place.
I am NOT a doctor.  I try to help, but do not take what I say as medical advice.


Every journey, however large or small starts with the first step.

Sleep-well
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#7
RE: Weight loss - at what point would a cure kick in?
(12-15-2017, 10:06 AM)gcritchley Wrote: I lost 20 lbs (I'm now 180lbs, 5'10" and about 18% body-fat). I have "mild OSA" according to the Registered Portable Monitoring" mail-in sleep study I did last week. I didn't do a test at the higher weight - but self diagnosed based on symptoms and Oximeter readings.

Would it follow that if I lost another 10 or even 20 lbs, I might come in as cured?

It's possible. It depends on whether or not weight gain was the cause. One thing that's much more likely is that weight loss will allow you to lower your pressure. This makes CPAP therapy more comfortable, and makes it easier to get a good mask fit.

Rather than focus on a cure I would recommend focusing on how you feel and what the data shows. Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) is diagnosed by statistical means, it's not so much a question of whether you have it as it is a question of how bad it is. Regardless, my point is that if CPAP therapy can improve your quality of life, and its drawbacks are outweighed by its benefits, then you might want to consider continuing it even if you can reach that magic AHI threshold of 5.

You can try setting your pressure at 4, the lowest possible setting, and see what happens to your AHI, your blood oxygen levels, and see how you feel during the day.

By the way, the pressure range you show in your profile is awfully high. Analysis of your data might reveal that a narrower range would improve the effectiveness of your therapy.
Sleepster

INFORMATION ON APNEA BOARD FORUMS OR ON APNEABOARD.COM SHOULD NOT BE CONSIDERED AS MEDICAL ADVICE. ALWAYS SEEK THE ADVICE OF A PHYSICIAN BEFORE SEEKING TREATMENT FOR MEDICAL CONDITIONS, INCLUDING SLEEP APNEA. INFORMATION POSTED ON THE APNEA BOARD WEB SITE AND FORUMS ARE PERSONAL OPINION ONLY AND NOT NECESSARILY A STATEMENT OF FACT.
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#8
RE: Weight loss - at what point would a cure kick in?
Sleepster

QUOTE: By the way, the pressure range you show in your profile is awfully high. Analysis of your data might reveal that a narrower range would improve the effectiveness of your therapy.QUOTE

Thanks all for your responses.

I need to update my profile settings - I'll do that now. My range is now 6 - 7.5. Last night my AHI was .08, and it was from 4 x 10 second hypopneas. I still feel tired though.
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#9
RE: Weight loss - at what point would a cure kick in?
Just as another data point, I am 5'9" and my doctor wanted me to get down to 175 which he regarded as my ideal weight. I think if you lost another 20 lbs. you would be skinny, unless you have a small frame. Congratulations on losing the 20 pounds; may it stay lost!
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#10
RE: Weight loss - at what point would a cure kick in?
Watch your charts on Sleepyhead.
If you are beginning to have many nights with an AHI of zero, or only "centrals" but they are concentrated around the times when you are in twilight sleep in the morning or evening (false positives), then start watching your pressures.

The machine responds to flow limitations and hypopnea events by increasing your pressure, up to the limit that the machine is programmed for.
If you are "cured", your pressure will be at or near your minimum pressure and you will have few or no events.

Generally, CPAP therapy is a lifetime commitment. As stated above, there are aspects of aging that contribute to apnea, some of which can even be made worse by weight loss, particularly rapid weight loss when things can get a bit, uhh, "floppy".

That doesn't mean that you won't get to the point that you may be able to get a good night sleep without therapy every now and then, such as when visiting friends, camping, etc.
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