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Your Personal CPAP Success Story - Post Here
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DrWho? Offline

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Post: #301
RE: Your Personal CPAP Success Story - Post Here
Hi, I'm a newby having just joined a few minutes ago

I've been using a CPAP machine for 3 years. Even after a few nights I niticed the difference in better sleeping. Whick I had been diagnosed with OSA before diagnosis 3 years ago!

I'm not a Doctor but a fan of The Doctor. any views,comments etc are my own
11-05-2013 02:23 AM
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robysue Online
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Machine: PR Dreamstation BiPAP Auto
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Location: Buffalo, NY

Post: #302
RE: Your Personal CPAP Success Story - Post Here
I've been using CPAP/BiPAP for over three years now. I was not one of those people who had instant results. Far from it. The short version? The first three months of PAPing was hell for me. I felt about 100 to 1000 times worse on PAP than I did before I started PAP. The next three months of PAPing were purgatory. The downward spiral at least stopped spiraling downward, but things didn't seem to be improving much either. But towards the end of the first six months of PAPing, the phrase Woke up with no hand or foot pain this morning began to appear on a regular basis in my sleep journal. That was the first sign that PAPing was doing something positive for me.

Here's the long version of my story:

Pre-diagnosis: How I was feeling and what my symptoms were (and what they weren't)
In August 2010 I was diagnosed with moderate sleep apnea. I was just past my 53rd birthday. (My diagnostic AHI = 23.3, with the bulk of the score being made up of "hypopneas with arousal" scored under the AASM Alternative Standard.)

Prior to my official OSA diagnosis I had no problems with daytime sleepiness. I described the subjective quality of my sleep as "ok, but not good." (It had been genuinely good when I was in my 30s and early 40s.) ln the morning I would wake up with a lot of pain in my hands and feet. On the worst mornings, I'd tell hubby that it felt like I'd slept with my hands and feet in fists all night. The pain had been written off as "minor arthritis" by my PCP, and since it got better as the day progressed, I didn't really spend too much time dwelling on it. I suffered chronic headaches, but I'd suffered from chronic headaches from the time I was a child. My headaches did not resemble the classic OSA headache. Or rather: The OSA part of my chronic headaches was well masked by all the other types of headaches that I suffer from. I did have a lot of daytime fatigue. The fatigue had been ascribed to menopause and not getting enough sleep on a nightly basis: Bedtime was typically around 11 or 11:30, but it would take me 30-45 minutes (sometimes an hour) to get to sleep, and the alarm would go off around 6:30 or 7:00. I'd sleep in on weekends.

Sometime in my late 40s, hubby began noticing that I would stop breathing for "alarmingly long periods of time" in my sleep. He nagged me for a few years to get a sleep test before I finally consented to in August 2010.


Diagnosis and Buying the Machine: How I avoided getting stuck with a brick
I met with the sleep doctor in August 2010 after the diagnostic sleep study and expressed my concerns about CPAP therapy and my desire for a full data machine. The sleep doctor blew me off and told me, "You don't need a full data machine because you'll feel better in two weeks." I went ahead and scheduled the titration study for 8/29/2010.

Shortly after the titration study, the sleep doc's office started calling daily wanting me to authorize them to fax my prescription to the DME next door to their office---a DME that I'd already rejected because they were intending on setting me up with a brick that would record nothing but usage data. It got so bad that I had hubby call them and tell them that if they called me one more time that I would fire the damn doctor and take my business elsewhere or some such thing. That got the doc's harassing phone calls to stop.

Meanwhile I was phoning my insurance company and interviewing DMEs with information that I'd learned from two other CPAP forurms. (I had not discovered this one way back then.) I eventually found a small DME that specialized in CPAP equipment that set all their new customers up with the customer's choice of a Resmed S9 AutoSet or a PR System One Auto (Series 50). I found out they worked with my insurance, and I told them to order the S9 AutoSet, contacted the doc's office to have them fax over the prescription, and set up the appointment to pick up my machine.


Oct-Dec 2010: My first three months of PAPing were Hell
I picked up my S9 AutoSet and started my CPAP adventure on September 23, 2010. My brand new S9 AutSet was set to straight CPAP mode at 9cm of pressure (as per my prescription) with EPR = 3 and a ramp of 45 minutes.

And that first night I had one of the worst night's sleep that I've ever had in my entire life. And it got worse during the first two weeks. By the end of the first two weeks, I was having an incredibly hard time just facing the idea of going to bed each night. And I was starting to delay going to bed as long as possible in hopes that I'd be able to fall asleep quicker with the damn mask on my nose. And it wasn't working.

And I was waking up multiple times during the night with severe aerophagia. As in it felt like I'd swallowed a basketball. It looked like I'd swallowed a basketball too. My stomach was visibly distended and rock hard on many mornings. I was in tears much of the time and highly emotional. I was physically exhausted and emotionally exhausted. I was craving sleep and falling asleep at my desk. I was frightened of falling asleep while driving for the first time in my life and I started relying on my husband to drive me to and from work. (I'm a tenured math professor at a SUNY college.) People at school started asking me what the hell was wrong with me because of the deep dark circles around my eyes and the fact that I was obviously no longer functioning very well in terms of committee work (I resigned as the chair of one department committee that semester) and I could not keep up with my grading that semester. In short, I had become a walking zombie within two weeks of starting CPAP.

And yet as tired and as sleepy as I was during the daytime, as soon as I put the damn mask on at night and turned the machine on, I was instantly woken up with severe discomfort to the point where I simply could not relax enough to fall asleep in a timely fashion. And the longer I lay there with the mask on, the more the sensory stimuli coming from the machine would disturb me and wake me up.

Hubby took things into his own hands and called the sleep doc about two weeks into this ordeal (and about 2 or 3 weeks before my first follow up appointment was scheduled). He insisted that I be seen by somebody and that I be seen by somebody within a day or two. At the meeting with the PA (I never did see the sleep doc again), the PA dutifully listened to all my complaints and concerns and even took the ten page hand written list of them for her files. She then suggested switching me to APAP for a two week autotitration. (and she was surprised to find out that I had an APAP and the DME would only have to change the settings.)

The switch to APAP was with the machine running wide open---as in 4-20 cm with EPR still set to 3. It took the edge off the aerophagia, but did not end it. At least now the stomach was no longer visibly distended every single morning. I was still having severe problems getting to sleep every night and I still dreaded bedtime. At the end of the titration period, hubby and I returned to see the PA. The PA tried to get me to take sleeping pills, but I was unwilling to do so. (There is a family history of addictive behavior and substance abuse.) The PA agreed to switch me permanently to APAP with a 4-8 cm range. And a follow up in late November was scheduled.

Both before and after the post-titration visit with the PA, in October the CPAP-induced bedtime insomnia was growing out of control. But once I'd finally get to sleep, I'd usually manage to stay asleep for several hours. Hubby found it difficult to wake me up in the morning, and so my sleep schedule started to drift further and further out of whack with what it needed to be. I was finding myself unable to get to sleep until after 3 or 4 am much of the time. Hubby was allowing me to sleep until 9 or 10 when my teaching schedule allowed me to sleep that late. But even so, I was falling asleep on my feet at this point as in literally falling asleep in micronaps while teaching math classes. I was still afraid to drive and I was finding it harder and harder to keep up with the grading for the classes I was teaching.

Throughout November, my daytime functioning was still terrible---particularly compared to my pre-CPAP days. I still looked and felt terrible. Aerophagia was still an on going problem, but at least was not at the level of severity of the "basketball in the stomach" it had been in the first two weeks of PAPing. In the November appointment, the PA admitted that she was running out of ideas on what to suggest since my leaks were non-existent. She and the sleep doc finally talked about my case at some point and they decided to recommend a bilevel titration study. The bilevel titration study was scheduled for Tuesday night before Thanksgiving.

That study was interesting to say the least. I thought I slept about 4 hours out of the 7 hour sleep study period. When the data came back, it showed I'd slept for just under 2 hours. Sad WOW. The insomnia was worse that even I thought it was. But (and it is an important but) lying in bed with the bipap blowing air down my throat was much less uncomfortable than lying in my own bed every night with the S9 blowing air down my throat was.

So December was spent researching bi-level machines (the Resmed S9 VPAP was NOT yet on the market and it was unknown when it would become available) and ordering the PR System One BiPAP I now use. And the insomnia continued to grow worse.

But I continued to do serious thinking about the data off that bi-level titration study. I simply could not ignore the implications of the study saying I'd slept 111 minutes when I'd truly thought I'd slept for about four hours. I was finally able to acknowledge that the CPAP-induced insomnia beast was larger than I could conquer on my own.


Jan-March 2011: My next three months of PAPing were Purgatory
On Dec. 31 I and the PA met to review the first week with the BiPAP and also to talk about the insomnia. We jointly designed a largely cognitive behavior therapy for insomnia program designed to rein in the CPAP-induced insomnia. I also agreed to take sleeping pills on an as needed basis to prevent too many sleepless nights from happening in a row.

And so the New Year started with a declaration of war on the Insomnia. The First War on Insomnia was largely waged with sleep restriction, a sleep log, a rigid wake up time, and a bed time that was set as the later of (1:30 am OR "when you first get sleepy").

At the same time, I was also fighting the First War on Migraines. In retrospect it's become clear that some of the extreme sensory overload I felt from the CPAP during Fall 2010 was aggravating my migraines in a serious fashion and there was a serious "positive feedback loop" going on that was adversely affecting things by making my migraines much worse during that time frame.

During the first three months of the First War on Insomnia, my daytime functioning started to stabilize. I wasn't feeling much better than I had been feeling in December. But at least I was no longer feeling any worse. And that was an accomplishment: The downward spiral had finally been stopped and I could finally start to recover.

During January aerophagia continued to be a problem. Another titration study in February 2011 and another pressure adjustment (to my current tight BiPAP Auto range: Max IPAP = 8cm , min EPAP = 4cm) finally took care of the aerophagia problems.

The sleep restriction during the first three months of the War on Insomnia really helped to consolidate my sleep cycles. I began to remember fewer wakes. And more importantly, I began to remember less discomfort during the night at those wakes. And the latency to sleep began to shorten dramatically, which increased my comfort sleeping with the machine even more.

Still, there was a lot of "two steps forward, one step backwards" progress during this time frame. The War on Migraines was being waged with antiepileptic medication and I was finding the side effects intolerable. And as the side effects of each antieplieptic med grew to be intolerable, it halted progress in the War on Insomnia. And when the War on Insomnia was going badly, then sleeping with the CPAP would also become problematic. It was all tied together. *sigh*

But the general trend was in the right direction. And the sleep log was the check on reality. And about 2 months into the War on Insomnia (and 5 months into PAPing) a phrase started to appear in the sleep log now and then: Woke up with no hand and foot pain this morning..

By 3 months into the War on Insomnia and 6 months into PAPing, that phrase was occurring on a regular basis. On more mornings than not, I was writing: Woke up with no hand and foot pain this morning. That was the very first sign that PAP was doing anything positive for me at all.

When I asked the PA about it at the next appointment, she said that her best guess was that the hand and foot pain had been caused by OSA-related inflammation. And that with six months of PAPing, my body had finally managed to heal enough where the inflammation levels had been reduced so the hand and foot pain were no longer present.

My own theory is that inflammation is part of the story. And that part of the story is that the OSA-related arousals were pumping a lot of cortisol and other stress related hormones through my system. And that I actually was sleeping with my hands and feet in fists much of the night---as in my body was preparing to "fight" whatever enemy there was that was threatening it.


April-September 2011: My second six months of PAPing were a slow recovery to normality
During this time frame the War on Insomnia and the War on Migraines continued. Both eventually are "won" in the sense of reining in the monsters (although neither monster is completely defeated.) By June, I wound up switching sleep docs and by the end of the summer I also was engaged in a War on TMJ problems which had been largely ignored for too long and which also had some serious implications in just how badly I was sleeping during my early CPAP adjustment period.

As the Insomnia and the Migraines were brought under control, my mood lightened considerably. My energy levels slowly started to improve, and by my 1 year CPAP anniversary I was actually starting to feel better than I had felt pre-CPAP in terms of daytime functioning. On my best days I was feeling like I'd felt back in my early 40s. On my worst days I was feeling no worse than I'd felt in my late 40s---and much, much better than I'd felt in the hellish days right after starting CPAP.


And now?
It's now November 2013. Things have been up and down since my first CPAP anniversary. It's not the CPAP and it's not the OSA. It's just that I have a number of other chronic conditions that have more affect on my daily life than I want to admit.

Since November 2012, I've been battling a nasty tangle of chronic headaches, tmj problems, and insomnia (again). And, as always, whenever the Insomnia monster raises his ugly head, the aerophagia monster seems to come around again as well.

The discomfort of lying in bed with my mask on waiting for sleep to come is significant. And that's the one thing that I really still miss from my pre-CPAP days: I used to lie in bed daydreaming for hours if I could not get to sleep and it never bothered me. And now I can't because I get a serious stomach ache from the air that gets into my stomach. Or my eyes start to hurt from the air that gets blown into them through my tear ducts. Or the back my throat starts to tickle from the air being blown down it. In order to make this crazy therapy work, I have to fall asleep within about 10-15 minutes of putting my mask on. And that's tough to do without the Ambien on a lot of nights. I really wish I didn't have to take the Ambien.

But still: With BiPAP I wake up with no hand and foot pain on almost every morning. I like the fact that I no longer kick and thrash around the bed as much as I used to. Hubby likes the fact that he no longer wakes up wondering if I'm going to start breathing again.

And when my migraines, tmj pain, and tension headaches are all under control, I feel like I did back in my 40's, and that's a positive. And I know that I can't blame my migraines, tmj pain, and tension headaches on the damn BiPAP machine. Much as I hate the BiPAP's presence in my life (and I do still hate how it crimps my lifestyle), I also like what it does in terms of reducing pain.
11-07-2013 05:12 PM
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me50 Offline

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Posts: 2,559
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Machine: resmed S9 VPAP Auto
Mask Type: Nasal mask
Mask Make & Model: Wisp and Silicone Head gear
Humidifier: resmed H5i
CPAP Pressure: 18/8
CPAP Software: SleepyHead

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Post: #303
RE: Your Personal CPAP Success Story - Post Here
have you thought of trying a natural over the counter sleep aid?

Sounds like you have been to hell and are coming back from there more and more.

I still wake up all night long. I am looking for a new sleep doctor because the last one did not listen to me during my first appointment, did not ask me how I felt after the recent sleep study, did not ask me how I felt when I slept at home, how I felt when I woke up, etc. I tried to tell him but he just wasn't interested.

Hope you get it all figured out and glad you have seen improvement. I didn't have trouble with the CPAP machine but I have never slept throughout the night even when I was sick. I sleep a lot when I am sick but never straight through. After my last sleep study, I slept most of the weekend. Here is hoping the new sleep doc will be better at listening and helping.

So much is being cut out of medical coverage now with this new health plan requirement that it is scary.
11-07-2013 08:57 PM
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sphilipps Offline

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Machine: PR Sustem One ReMstar BIPAP ST machine
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Post: #304
RE: Your Personal CPAP Success Story - Post Here [copied from old forum]
(02-20-2012 11:24 PM)SuperSleeper Wrote:  
jeffy1958 Wrote:I'm on cloud nine. Go ahead- I dare you to ask me why?

Oh what the heck I just came from my Dr's office - the E.N.T. (ear, nose, throat). I have got this machine under my full and complete control along with what I'm suppose to be doing!!!! The big thing is my AHI. Are you ready for this - 0.6!!! Yes that right 0.6!!! No the decimal point is not in the wrong place, it's suppose to be in front of the 6!!! My leak rate is a - drum roll please - 7.2 median, 95th%: 13.4 and the max was 23.4!!! And that may be due to the itching problems I get once in a while and the fact I may be opening my big mouth a time or two. To go along with that o.6 how about this: Apnea index - 0.5 Obstructive: 0.3. I'm so below mild I scare myself.

I am proof that anyone can do this with the positive outlook I have. I can relate to: Frustrating - Aggravating - Irritating and any other ing you can thinkl of. It always wasn't the "bed of roses" it is now - trust me!!! I too do not wake up with the headaches. I have more energy to get through the day. I actually look forward to going to bed and hooking up!!! How can anyone NOT sleep with a big chunk of plastic and a 6 foot hose - they must be crazy - they are the abnormal people of the world - we are the normal ones!!!

Did I tell you my AHI was 0.6???

I am floating on cloud nine - the sun has been shinning all day - the temp hit 47 today - what could possibly... Oh crap we loose an hour of sleep this weekend. Oh well - can't have it all perfect can we!!!

How did you get this knowledge? You are talking about your Apneu index and a lot of other stuff that I do not understand. Are you a technician yourself? I was deagnosed in April of 2013 and all I know is that I stop breathing 97 times in an hour. How to I get your knowledge. I live in the Netherlands, here they do not discuse any of this stuff with the patient. Please help me till where you can. Thank you
How did you get this knowledge? You are talking about your Apneu index and a lot of other stuff that I do not understand. Are you a technician yourself? I was deagnosed in April of 2013 and all I know is that I stop breathing 97 times in an hour. How to I get your knowledge. I live in the Netherlands, here they do not discuse any of this stuff with the patient. Please help me till where you can. Thank you
(This post was last modified: 11-12-2013 03:18 AM by sphilipps.)
11-12-2013 03:17 AM
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DeepBreathing Offline
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Machine: Resmed S9 VPAP Adapt
Mask Type: Full face mask
Mask Make & Model: F&P Simplus
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CPAP Pressure: EPAP: 9 - 15 PS: 3 - 10
CPAP Software: ResScan SleepyHead

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Sex: Male
Location: Perth, Western Australia

Post: #305
RE: Your Personal CPAP Success Story - Post Here
Hi sphilipps , welcome to the forum. Most of us here learned this stuff from this forum. Start reading the posts in the main forum and ask all the questions you can, You can also read up on some of the material at the Apnea Board Wiki http://www.apneaboard.com/wiki/index.php?title=Wiki_Home

I believe that healthcare is a partnership between the patient and the professional. Don't forget - it's your health we're talking about. Start by asking questions. As him/her to explain what's happening to you, and how the machine will help. Ask about pressures and other settings. Don't be afraid to push. If your doctor doesn't want to engage in a partnership, then maybe you should look for a new doctor.

One way to help yourself understand is to download software to interpret what's happening. Have a look at SleepyHead http://sourceforge.net/projects/sleepyhead/ It's not hard to use and will show on a minute-by-minute basis just what's happening.

Again, welcome to the forum, and ask as many questions as you can.

DeepBreathing
Apnea Board Moderator
www.ApneaBoard.com


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INFORMATION ON APNEA BOARD FORUMS OR ON APNEABOARD.COM SHOULD NOT BE CONSIDERED AS MEDICAL ADVICE. ALWAYS SEEK THE ADVICE OF A PHYSICIAN BEFORE SEEKING TREATMENT FOR MEDICAL CONDITIONS, INCLUDING SLEEP APNEA. INFORMATION POSTED ON THE APNEA BOARD WEB SITE AND FORUMS ARE PERSONAL OPINION ONLY AND NOT NECESSARILY A STATEMENT OF FACT.
11-12-2013 07:32 AM
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jrolli1509 Offline

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Joined: May 2013

Machine: ResMed S9
Mask Type: Full face mask
Mask Make & Model: ResMed F10 +Thornton myTAP (mandibular advancem device)
Humidifier: ResMed h5i w/climateLine
CPAP Pressure: APAP8-20, was on BiPap 19/15
CPAP Software: ResScan

Other Comments: Severe Structural OSA undx 40yrs/now chronic sleep deprivation; tx TORS tongue reduction

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Location: Austin

Post: #306
RE: Your Personal CPAP Success Story - Post Here
Thank you for sharing Robysue! Congratulations on your wonderful progress and journey to normalcy. Towards the end of your launch story, you mentioned that you were continuing to battle tmj pain along with other issues. BUT are you aware that current research is finding that bruxism and craniofacial pain can be related to hypoxia? Apparently it is a very primal reflex to clench jaw when desat as it is another mechanism that jolts us back to wakefulness and breath. Plus I experienced akathesia side effects of SSRI antidepressants, and even broke a molar crown before I learned the significance, and now wear a dental occlusal splint (ego retainer) during the day. The akathesia is more common that you think, and "SSRI effect" was tucked into almost every sleep study I had.
The sequelae of sleep apnea is all over the place, and often discovery is left to the individual in time. Hope this helps elucidate.
11-12-2013 08:35 AM
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robysue Online
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Machine: PR Dreamstation BiPAP Auto
Mask Type: Nasal pillows
Mask Make & Model: Swift FX
Humidifier: PR Dreamstation humidfier
CPAP Pressure: min EPAP = 4; max IPAP = 9;
CPAP Software: SleepyHead EncoreBasic EncorePro

Other Comments: Papping since September 2010

Sex: Female
Location: Buffalo, NY

Post: #307
RE: Your Personal CPAP Success Story - Post Here
(11-12-2013 08:35 AM)jrolli1509 Wrote:  Thank you for sharing Robysue! Congratulations on your wonderful progress and journey to normalcy. Towards the end of your launch story, you mentioned that you were continuing to battle tmj pain along with other issues. BUT are you aware that current research is finding that bruxism and craniofacial pain can be related to hypoxia?
Yes, I'm aware of this. But in my case, the TMJ pain is really related to how the joint is put together and a powerful tendency for my brain to establish positive feedback loops with regards to grinding (both in the daytime and at night). I need the guard to protect the teeth from a certain baseline amount of grinding due to a bad bite and tension, but the typical guard then triggers my brain to send out the signal to "chew harder" instead of just relaxing and getting use to the guard being in my mouth.

My TMJ history predates my OSA by at least 20-30 years. The TMJ settled in during or immediately following the removal of my braces at 18. (There was no evidence that I developed OSA until my late 40s.) Braces addressed, but did not completely fix all my bite problems. (Braces may also have been a contributing factor in the development of my OSA later in life since they reduced the space for my tongue in my mouth.)

Throughout my 20s and 30s, my TMJ problems were kept under control by night guards (but I chewed through them regularly) and I was waking up refreshed and rested on most mornings after getting 6 1/2 to 7 1/2 hours of sleep. Daytime sleepiness and fatigue was never an issue. Hubby was not making any comments about me snoring or stopping breathing at night. Sometime in my late 40s, however, hubby started noticing soft snoring and started commenting that I would quit breathing at night. I was still sleeping 6 1/2 to 7 1/2 hours per night, but not waking up feeling particularly refreshed or rested. I still had no daytime sleepiness, although daytime pain and fatigue was not uncommon. The TMJ pain did not get any worse, but I continued to chew through the guards

Fast forward to my early 50s: Hubby finally persuaded me to get tested for OSA and I started CPAP. Notably, on my diagnostic sleep study there were no clinically significant O2 desats scored. All of my hypopneas were scored under the "Alternative standard" which allows for scoring if there is an associated EEG arousal regardless of whether there is a desat. In my case, all my events were scored because of EEG arousals; none of them were associated with O2 desats.

After starting CPAP, my TMJ problems exploded, along with my headache problems, in addition to the CPAP-induced insomnia problems. This is atypical. For most people, initiating CPAP reduces headaches and it often reduces TMJ problems because of the connection between bruxism and hypoxia (and hence the OSA-desats.)

It became clear that the TMJ had to be addressed by a specialist after my primary care dentist made yet another night guard about 6-7 months after I started CPAP and the new guard cracked within one month. Since September 2011, I've had 4 guards made because I keep chewing through them or cracking them. Each guard has been a slightly different type, and the last guard required substantially more measurements. The goal was to design a guard that would not trigger the positive feedback loop that results in more chewing rather than less. It's now almost 8 weeks old and it looks promising---very few chew marks and the ones that are there are very minor.

Quote:Apparently it is a very primal reflex to clench jaw when desat as it is another mechanism that jolts us back to wakefulness and breath. Plus I experienced akathesia side effects of SSRI antidepressants, and even broke a molar crown before I learned the significance, and now wear a dental occlusal splint (ego retainer) during the day. The akathesia is more common that you think, and "SSRI effect" was tucked into almost every sleep study I had.
The sequelae of sleep apnea is all over the place, and often discovery is left to the individual in time. Hope this helps elucidate.
Having never taken an SSRI antidepressent, I don't think that would be part of my problem. And since all six of my sleep studies were done with my night guards in place, bruxism did not pop up as a concern on any of the tests. I do agree that the sequelae of sleep apnea are all over the place.

But I also think that the sensory aspects of CPAP therapy are not well understood. And for a minority of new CPAPers, I think the sensory overload aspects of CPAP therapy and their potential (negative) affects on the subjective quality of sleep and hence the quality of the new PAPer's life are largely ignored by the Sleep Medicine professionals.
11-12-2013 09:53 AM
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fb4mark Offline

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Post: #308
RE: Your Personal CPAP Success Story - Post Here
I've been on CPAP 1 mo. I sleep better when I sleep. I still can not stay asleep longer than 45 min. at one time. My CPAP has a card that shows when I wake I have no restriction and I am breathing fine. Most of the time I wake it is at the end of a dream. I wake peacefully with no gasping or leg movement. I can go back to sleep within 10 - 15 min. but I wake up again in less than 45 min. Has anyone else had this problem? Thanks for any help.

MARK
11-12-2013 12:36 PM
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Sleepster Offline
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CPAP Pressure: MaxI 13.6 | MinE 5.2 | PS 4.4
CPAP Software: ResScan SleepyHead

Other Comments: Diagnosed Nov 2011. Conquered aerophagia.

Sex: Male
Location: Houston, Texas

Post: #309
RE: Your Personal CPAP Success Story - Post Here [copied from old forum]
(11-12-2013 03:17 AM)sphilipps Wrote:  How did you get this knowledge? You are talking about your Apneu index and a lot of other stuff that I do not understand. Are you a technician yourself? I was deagnosed in April of 2013 and all I know is that I stop breathing 97 times in an hour.

Two things: Your AHI was 97, so you know that means 97 events per hour. That was without the machine, so hopefully it's much lower than that now that you have the machine.

The other thing is leak rates.

You can check your leak rate by looking at the "Percent time in large leak" in the on-screen menu. You can also check your 7-day and 30-day AHI averages the same way.

Beyond that get some software such as the free SleepyHead program and take a closer look at your data.

More than any of this, though, the most important thing is using your machine. If you're one of the lucky ones who has no trouble adapting then give thanks.

Sleepster
Apnea Board Moderator
www.ApneaBoard.com


INFORMATION ON APNEA BOARD FORUMS OR ON APNEABOARD.COM SHOULD NOT BE CONSIDERED AS MEDICAL ADVICE. ALWAYS SEEK THE ADVICE OF A PHYSICIAN BEFORE SEEKING TREATMENT FOR MEDICAL CONDITIONS, INCLUDING SLEEP APNEA. INFORMATION POSTED ON THE APNEA BOARD WEB SITE AND FORUMS ARE PERSONAL OPINION ONLY AND NOT NECESSARILY A STATEMENT OF FACT.
11-12-2013 10:18 PM
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mastiffdude Offline

New Members

Posts: 1
Joined: Nov 2013

Machine: Philips
Mask Type: Full face mask
Mask Make & Model: quatro 4
Humidifier: Philips
CPAP Pressure: 12
CPAP Software: Other Software

Other Comments:

Sex: Male
Location:

Post: #310
RE: Your Personal CPAP Success Story - Post Here
I have been on CPAP for about 18 months now.I went to a sleep clinic after i had very nearly choked to death in my sleep.It wasnt the first time but the last time was enough to tell my doctor about it.So i did 2 sleep studies, the first one, they didnt have time to try the mask out.If i can say one thing is that i Fiddled around with the wrong masks for about 4 months,leading my therapist to keep changing my pressure.MAKE SURE THE MASK FITS!I tried 6 different masks before i got the right one to make a good seal with my face.Also clean your mask parts as much as you can, i got a rash around my mouth when i hadnt cleaned the mask for awhile.Im good with the CPAP now and i havent had a choking incident and i sleep better too.
11-18-2013 09:53 PM
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