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co2
#11
RE: co2
(02-13-2018, 02:02 PM)Sleep2Snore Wrote: It is quite simple really, if you are breathing normally there is only a slight increase in CO2 levels in the blood during the night, but those with Sleep Apnea and Central events stop breathing during the night and this causes co2 to rise, because you are not breathing the by-products in your body build up.
This leads to a higher than normal co2 levels than people without Sleep Apnea.
Levels go up slightly in most people during the night as peoples breathing slows down, however, Apnea patients have other problems that cause it to rise higher than other people, usually due to CA events or just stopping breathing.
You take in oxygen with each breath and you expel co2 when you breath out.
Patients with Sleep Apnea also can have lower levels of oxygen in their blood before treatment, this is why they monitor your oxygen levels when you go for a sleep study.

Levels go up slightly in most people during the night as peoples breathing slows down, however, Apnea patients have other problems that cause it to rise higher than other people, usually due to CA events or just stopping breathing.

You take in oxygen with each breath and you expel co2 when you breath out.
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#12
RE: co2
This debate all goes to a more complex discussion of Respiratory Drive and Hypoxic Drive.  It is hard to make a simple discussion, or as Walla says, "one size fits all".   The effect of pressure support varies a lot between individuals. 

Nito, what effect does EPR have in your current results? If you use more EPR and have centrals as a result, then bilevel is not your solution.
Sleeprider
Apnea Board Moderator
www.ApneaBoard.com

____________________________________________
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INFORMATION ON APNEA BOARD FORUMS OR ON APNEABOARD.COM SHOULD NOT BE CONSIDERED AS MEDICAL ADVICE. ALWAYS SEEK THE ADVICE OF A PHYSICIAN BEFORE SEEKING TREATMENT FOR MEDICAL CONDITIONS, INCLUDING SLEEP APNEA. INFORMATION POSTED ON THE APNEA BOARD WEB SITE AND FORUMS ARE PERSONAL OPINION ONLY AND NOT NECESSARILY A STATEMENT OF FACT.
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#13
RE: co2
(02-13-2018, 02:27 PM)jerry1967 Wrote:
(02-13-2018, 02:02 PM)Sleep2Snore Wrote: It is quite simple really, if you are breathing normally there is only a slight increase in CO2 levels in the blood during the night, but those with Sleep Apnea and Central events stop breathing during the night and this causes co2 to rise, because you are not breathing the by-products in your body build up.
This leads to a higher than normal co2 levels than people without Sleep Apnea.
Levels go up slightly in most people during the night as peoples breathing slows down, however, Apnea patients have other problems that cause it to rise higher than other people, usually due to CA events or just stopping breathing.
You take in oxygen with each breath and you expel co2 when you breath out.
Patients with Sleep Apnea also can have lower levels of oxygen in their blood before treatment, this is why they monitor your oxygen levels when you go for a sleep study.

Levels go up slightly in most people during the night as peoples breathing slows down, however, Apnea patients have other problems that cause it to rise higher than other people, usually due to CA events or just stopping breathing.

You take in oxygen with each breath and you expel co2 when you breath out.
Isn't that what I just said?
I am NOT a doctor.  I try to help, but do not take what I say as medical advice.


Every journey, however large or small starts with the first step.

Sleep-well
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#14
RE: co2
Sleeprider,
MY EPR is two and I still get pairs of centrals together with hypoapneas no matter if my fixed pressure is 13 or 12. I was discussing this yesterday with my doctor and he ordered an arterial blood gas test which I did this morning.
If carbon dioxide turns out to be High he wants to upgrade me to a new machine: ASV or Bipap
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#15
RE: co2
I think what the forum does with sleepyhead, is work with pressure induced ca and the co2/o2 balance with a new user. As per sleeprider's link. Then advise those that don't settle down, to go back to their doctor.
Your's is a different case, where the doctor thinks you are retaining co2, We/the forum, don't have the tools at hand to help you with this. Even a spo2 meter won't show retained co2 properly.

The doctor is doing the right thing and getting a blood gas analysis. This will show your blood gas levels and other markers. As near as I can figure out. The reason for retaining co2 will determine what machine will be used. More than likely you will be titrated, If it's low o2 and no major issues, you may be titrated to a higher cpap pressure, or BPAP. If it's the nervous system not telling the system to breathe, it may be an ASV. If it's obesity, COPD or weak muscles, it may be a BPAP/VAPS.
mask fit http://www.apneaboard.com/wiki/index.php...ask_Primer
For auto-cpap, from machine data or software. You can set the min pressure 1 or 2cm below 95%. Or clinicians commonly use the maximum or 95% pressure for fixed pressure CPAP, this can also be used for min pressure.
https://aasm.org/resources/practiceparam...rating.pdf
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#16
RE: co2
Thanks Ajack. I will keep you all posted as soon as I collect the results of the arterial blood gas test
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#17
RE: co2
Pco2 is ok within normal range: 36,8
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#18
RE: co2
Nito, your event rate as I recall has been consistently less than 1 AHI, and in fact consists of just an isolated one or two events per night. I think you give those minor events a lot more attention than they deserve.
Sleeprider
Apnea Board Moderator
www.ApneaBoard.com

____________________________________________
Download OSCAR Software
Soft Cervical Collar
Optimizing Therapy
Organize your OSCAR Charts
Attaching Files
Mask Primer
How To Deal With Equipment Supplier


INFORMATION ON APNEA BOARD FORUMS OR ON APNEABOARD.COM SHOULD NOT BE CONSIDERED AS MEDICAL ADVICE. ALWAYS SEEK THE ADVICE OF A PHYSICIAN BEFORE SEEKING TREATMENT FOR MEDICAL CONDITIONS, INCLUDING SLEEP APNEA. INFORMATION POSTED ON THE APNEA BOARD WEB SITE AND FORUMS ARE PERSONAL OPINION ONLY AND NOT NECESSARILY A STATEMENT OF FACT.
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#19
RE: co2
Nito, if you are down to a few events per night, I don't think changing the machine will do a lot of good.
There may be other reasons outside Sleep Apnea that is causing this, your doctor will get the results (he may well be doing the right thing by getting this checked) and decide he wants to give you a new machine.  But I would be doing other tests like lung capacity and efficiency rather than a new machine.
Most people with quite a few events per night might not have raised levels so much as to cause concern, so if the tests come back that you have raised levels or co2 that is high enough to worry about I would be asking for tests to find out why they are at raised levels.  Rather than blame a cpap machine that has got you down to a few events per night.
Discuss this with the doctor, he might still try you on a new machine, but to be honest I don't think you need one.
If gasses are high it may be for another reason.

Good luck in any case.
I am NOT a doctor.  I try to help, but do not take what I say as medical advice.


Every journey, however large or small starts with the first step.

Sleep-well
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#20
RE: co2
(02-13-2018, 02:31 PM)Sleep2Snore Wrote:
(02-13-2018, 02:27 PM)jerry1967 Wrote:
(02-13-2018, 02:02 PM)Sleep2Snore Wrote: It is quite simple really, if you are breathing normally there is only a slight increase in CO2 levels in the blood during the night, but those with Sleep Apnea and Central events stop breathing during the night and this causes co2 to rise, because you are not breathing the by-products in your body build up.
This leads to a higher than normal co2 levels than people without Sleep Apnea.
Levels go up slightly in most people during the night as peoples breathing slows down, however, Apnea patients have other problems that cause it to rise higher than other people, usually due to CA events or just stopping breathing.
You take in oxygen with each breath and you expel co2 when you breath out.
Patients with Sleep Apnea also can have lower levels of oxygen in their blood before treatment, this is why they monitor your oxygen levels when you go for a sleep study.

Levels go up slightly in most people during the night as peoples breathing slows down, however, Apnea patients have other problems that cause it to rise higher than other people, usually due to CA events or just stopping breathing.

You take in oxygen with each breath and you expel co2 when you breath out.
Isn't that what I just said?
yes, just putting it under my name so I can find it better.
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