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elevated blood pressure at night from apnea
#11
(11-11-2014, 07:20 AM)laurie h Wrote: Hi, Thanks for your quick response. I went to a sleep doctor who has a very good reputation and he said that in 25 yrs of practice, i am one of his most challenging cases. lol. They had their best techs work with me and tried numerous masks and settings.
In my case, while i was in the sleep lab 3 separate nights, both the cpap and bi-pap machines increased my central episodes. Only at an extremely high setting, did it seem to help even a little and the Dr felt the risk of air leak to my eyes is not worth the risk as it did not much help.
they tried oxygen in the sleep lab and found it helped my apnea so i use it at home but still wake up 4-6 x a night with bp of 150/92 and higher.
Just wondered if anyone else here is dealing with this.

What was happening is what they call "pressure induced central apnea events". It is easy to treat and I am shocked this "doctor of 25 years" did not know this. When you further pursue this, go to another sleep doctor since he is obviously going on information that is very outdated and is not keeping up-to-date on the information in his field.

The treatment is to start at a pressure where the obstructive events are best decreased but the central events are not overly increased yet. Delicate balance. After a few months, the pressure is increased again. This is easier to do with an autoPAP. I was much like you where the pressure horribly increased my central events.

When you wake, your BP is up because you are had an apnea event. Seriously, this "doctor" needs to lose his license!

Call them, ask for a copy of your sleep study reports. Don't let them say you won't understand it or that it is a huge document. Say you want it anyway. Mention HIPPA (they know it as pronounced hip-uh). When you get it, make an appt with another sleep doctor and go there. You probably won't need another sleep study, just someone to write the prescription for the machine and the correct pressure range. INSIST on a data capable autoPAP. When you get that prescription, we'll help you figure out what to do with it.
PaulaO2
Apnea Board Moderator
www.ApneaBoard.com


Breathe deeply and count to zen.

INFORMATION ON APNEA BOARD FORUMS OR ON APNEABOARD.COM SHOULD NOT BE CONSIDERED AS MEDICAL ADVICE. ALWAYS SEEK THE ADVICE OF A PHYSICIAN BEFORE SEEKING TREATMENT FOR MEDICAL CONDITIONS, INCLUDING SLEEP APNEA. INFORMATION POSTED ON THE APNEA BOARD WEB SITE AND FORUMS ARE PERSONAL OPINION ONLY AND NOT NECESSARILY A STATEMENT OF FACT.




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#12
Yep apnea will increase your BP, cause ventricular afterload, which in my case cause thickening of my left ventricle walls. However the short time Ive been on pap treatment that is slowly reversing. Getting my apena took care of also stopped bouts of Afib that ablations surgery 3 years before didnt stop. And almost stopped even the rare "now" bout of PVCs.

My lung capacity is better. I can do things now that I could not do before because I would simply run out of breath and my heart go into Afib or heavy PVCs.

Less than ninety days on the machine, Ive lost a tad over 60 lbs. No diet but because I CAN now walk a mile a day I normally do. I couldnt before. The thing that sometimes limits that degenerative spinal disease but pap isnst going to fix that.
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#13
It makes sense that apnea would raise your blood pressure while you sleep if you're having many events per hour. As I understand it from my "...but I've stayed at a Holiday Inn" level of understanding, each time you stop breathing, your body gives you a shot of adrenaline every time to wake you enough so you breathe again.
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#14


What was happening is what they call "pressure induced central apnea events".

I had both Central and obstructive episodes the first night, BEFORE they put any machine on me, they were just monitoring me to see if I had apnea.

I am going to get my studies and get a second opinion.
Thanks to all who have responded.
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#15
All the more reason your alleged sleep doctor is an idiot. A second opinion is indeed called for. If a patient has the diagnosis of central apnea prior to the titration, the sleep doc should know a regular CPAP or even bilevel is not going to work.

However, we cannot help you if you do not give us the complete information from the beginning. I don't believe you told us you had been diagnosed with CSA prior to the titration study. Or were there just CA events that happened during the initial sleep study?
PaulaO2
Apnea Board Moderator
www.ApneaBoard.com


Breathe deeply and count to zen.

INFORMATION ON APNEA BOARD FORUMS OR ON APNEABOARD.COM SHOULD NOT BE CONSIDERED AS MEDICAL ADVICE. ALWAYS SEEK THE ADVICE OF A PHYSICIAN BEFORE SEEKING TREATMENT FOR MEDICAL CONDITIONS, INCLUDING SLEEP APNEA. INFORMATION POSTED ON THE APNEA BOARD WEB SITE AND FORUMS ARE PERSONAL OPINION ONLY AND NOT NECESSARILY A STATEMENT OF FACT.




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#16
(11-13-2014, 09:36 AM)PaulaO2 Wrote: All the more reason your alleged sleep doctor is an idiot. A second opinion is indeed called for. If a patient has the diagnosis of central apnea prior to the titration, the sleep doc should know a regular CPAP or even bilevel is not going to work.

However, we cannot help you if you do not give us the complete information from the beginning. I don't believe you told us you had been diagnosed with CSA prior to the titration study. Or were there just CA events that happened during the initial sleep study?


I am sorry you feel i was withholding information but I didn';t mean to.
I only found out there are 2 kinds of apnea when i went for my first study.I didn't know anything about apnea before that and I still have much to learn.After my first study they told me I have both.They then tried many different masks and both cpap and bi-pap machines.Everything they did increased my apneas except for plain oxygen which they said helped me.
I now sleep with oxygen 2 ml's but still wake up every hour to hour and a half all night.
I went for a 2nd opinion today and they are going to do another study with a ASV machine
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#17
(11-20-2014, 10:50 PM)laurie h Wrote: I went for a 2nd opinion today and they are going to do another study with a ASV machine

Hi laurie,

That's great. Good going.

Recent ASV models work much like an APAP and automatically slowly adjust the exhale pressure (EPAP) in order to reduce or avoid obstructive events (obstructive apneas, obstructive hypopneas, RERA, Flow Limitation, snoring).

The extra thing that ASV machines do is quickly (breath by breath) increase or decrease the amount of Pressure Support (PS). PS is the amount of pressure boost which is applied during inhalation.

The inhalation pressure (IPAP) always equals the (lowly self-adjusting) exhalation pressure (EPAP) plus the (quickly self-adjusting) Pressure Support: IPAP = EPAP + PS

If a central apnea begins, the ASV machine will immediately start automatically cycling between IPAP and EPAP, so that the higher IPAP pressure will cause our lungs to inhale, and then the lower EPAP pressure will allow our lungs to exhale. Pressure Support, the difference between the IPAP pressure and the EPAP pressure, typically may be as high as 10 (in units of cm H2O, meaning centimeters of water column) if the machine is doing for us all the work of breathing.

As soon as we again start to do some of the work ourselves, the amount of Pressure Support will decrease back down to a normal amount, so that the amount of air we are inhaling per minute (which is called the Minute Ventilation) is maintained at a steady amount. When we are breathing on our own the PS typically returns to a small value like 2 or 4.

Take care,
--- Vaughn

Membership in the Advisory Member group should not be understood as in any way implying medical expertise or qualification for advising Sleep Apnea patients concerning their treatment. The Advisory Member group provides advice and suggestions to Apnea Board administrators and staff on matters concerning Apnea Board operation and administrative policies - not on matters concerning treatment for Sleep Apnea. I think it is now too late to change the name of the group but I think Voting Member group would perhaps have been a more descriptive name for the group.
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#18
Sidenote question?:

"Avg % of patient triggered breaths" - what does this mean? And, if I am bouncing around 86 to 89% is this good or bad?
*I* am not a DOCTOR or any type of Health Care Professional. My thoughts/suggestions/ideas are strictly only my opinions.

"Only two defining forces have ever offered to die for you. Jesus Christ and the American Soldier. One died for your Soul, the other for your Freedom."
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