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humidifier questions
#1
I dug up my Reperonics LX passover humidifier that I bought and used probably a night or two 16 years ago. When I tried it years ago it was hard to breathe in and out. There was way too much drag on the air.. I thought perhaps with my new auto cpap that that might change and work out for me. As it was it was way hard to breathe in and out again. The inside of my humidifier has all kinds of baffles and looks like a maze. It seems to me, no wonder it's hard to breath on that thing.

I'm wondering if the new integrated humidifiers work any better. Do they allow you to breathe easily or is there some drag on the air? Can you tell a difference when using it as compared to not using it?

Also wondering if I got the new humidifier whether I can use it as a passover humidifier with no heat and to do so without it plugged in or turned on.

The other thing I'm wondering is I live in Florida and we all know there's more humidity here than other places around the country. I wonder if I really, really will benefit from a humidifier at all.

I do have some nasal tenderness, sometimes stuffiness and sometimes a runny nose probably largely because I use Afrin on a regular basis along with Naxonex, Zyrtec and Pseodophed PE.

During the winter we hardly use the heat and tend to leave the AC set to around 72 so if anything year round I tend to breathe cool air. As a matter of fact I often notice the tip of my nose feels cold to the touch when I get up.

Any tips appreciated.
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#2
No idea about your particular machine, but this is what I have found with y machine.
1. yes I can turn off the heat and use passive humidity, I have gone as far as putting ice cubes in the chamber with the water
2. My machine does not have a problem blowing air past any baffles in the water chamber
3. I personally do have a problem exhaling into pressure, this is the reason for the BiLevel machine I use, but this has nothing to do with the water chamber.
4. I am very sensitive to humidity levels and do not at all like to breathe warm air
5. I have my hose temperature set to 65 degrees, humidity set to 2 and for now it is okay
6. time of year and room temperature/humidity makes a difference in my machine settings

Hope this helps
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#3
(09-08-2016, 09:35 PM)Lanco Wrote: As it was it was way hard to breathe in and out again.

I'm wondering if the new integrated humidifiers work any better.

Do they allow you to breathe easily or is there some drag on the air? Can you tell a difference when using it as compared to not using it?

Also wondering if I got the new humidifier whether I can use it as a passover humidifier with no heat and to do so without it plugged in or turned on.

The other thing I'm wondering is I live in Florida and we all know there's more humidity here than other places around the country. I wonder if I really, really will benefit from a humidifier at all.

I do have some nasal tenderness, sometimes stuffiness and sometimes a runny nose probably largely because I use Afrin on a regular basis along with Naxonex, Zyrtec and Pseodophed PE.

During the winter we hardly use the heat and tend to leave the AC set to around 72 so if anything year round I tend to breathe cool air. As a matter of fact I often notice the tip of my nose feels cold to the touch when I get up.

Any tips appreciated.

The pressure delivered to the mask is what it is -- the blower is providing air at pressure to you, you are not sucking air from the machine. And, you are not exhaling through the humidifier, but out the controlled leak ports in the mask. Therefore, if you are experiencing difficulty breathing, you appear to have a settings issue.

The humidifier in an integrated unit is between the blower and the hose so it will act as a pass over humidifier if there is water in the chamber and the heater and hose temperature controls are off. The amount of water (humidity) carried by the unit to your mask is a function of ambient conditions.

The humidifier is a "comfort" item that prevents dry tissues and a more pleasant experience.

Have you spoken with your physician regarding nasal tenderness and your use of OTC products on a consistent basis? You should also check the pressure settings on your machine to deal with your difficulties in breathing. Some machines have a pressure relief feature that drops the pressure on the exhale to ease breathing.

About the best advice I can give is to suggest that you speak to your respiratory technician at your DME company or sleep physician to evaluate your particular issue.

Best of luck. Have you considered moving to Southern California where we have better weather (much less humidity), no bugs the size of Volkswagens, no alligators to speak of, and better eating oranges?
"The object in life is not to be on the side of the majority, but to escape finding oneself in the ranks of the insane." -- Marcus Aurelius
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#4
Lanco, the integrated machines from Respironics or Resmed have pressure sensors that are capable of compensating for resistance in the humidifier, tubing and mask and ensure delivered therapy pressure is accurate. Your Apex is a complete unknown. I have no idea how you got stuck with this Asian anomaly, but I'd complain and try to get one of the better known brands.
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#5
hi Lanco,

One thought about humidity in warm climates: it might be humid outside but if it is also hot outside and the A/C is on most of the time, then the inside air could still be very dry.

Also, agree with the others that difficulty breathing due to humidifier drag was a fig newton of your imagination to explain what was probably caused by other pressure settings.

I use auto settings for humidity on my machine. I think I set the tube temperature and let the machine auto adjust the humidity. Haven't touched that setting in a long time so I might have that reversed or both might be auto. Anyways, if you have the option, try the auto settings for the humidifier.

Finally, based on my own life experience (woof! see my avatar), a cold wet nose is an indicator of good health and vitality. Smile

Saldus Miegas
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#6
(09-09-2016, 01:19 AM)srlevine1 Wrote: Have you considered moving to Southern California where we have better weather (much less humidity), no bugs the size of Volkswagens, no alligators to speak of, and better eating oranges?

I hear Boron CA is nice. Big Grin

Admin Note:
JustMongo passed away in August 2017
Click HERE to read his Memorial Thread

~ Rest in Peace ~
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#7

Hi Lanco.

You live in FL and I know by my own experience that over there almost every day of the year is really wet because the lakes, swamps, the sea proximity, etc.
Maybe you really don't need the humidifier at all in FL.
My advice is that you give it a try with the lower settings and watch the results.
In modern machines the humidification system doesn't mess with the way that you breath.
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#8
The OP states that this is not a "standard" humidifier. And further that is has many baffles.
It is my opinion that the humidifier described in the OP would provide pressure drop with flow that cannot be calculated or compensated for.
ergo: IMHO, it should not be used.

[Image: resp%20passover%20hum.jpg]

Admin Note:
JustMongo passed away in August 2017
Click HERE to read his Memorial Thread

~ Rest in Peace ~
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#9
JM I just posted a separate discussion comparing various APAP machines in the Advisory Member forum. One problem that the Apex XT Auto has is its very slow response to increase pressure in response to obstructive events, and I'm sure it would not do well with the addition of a humidifier not designed for use with the machine. Next to the French Dreamstar, the Apex was the slowest to respond to OA by increasing pressure, and never achieved a pressure to restore normal breathing in the simulation in this comparative assessment. http://openres.ersjournals.com/content/1/1/00031-2015 Lanco's reported sense of not getting enough air with the humidifier in place is consistent with that article. The takeaway is that the Apex XT and machines in that category need to be more finely tuned to provide adequate minimum pressure.
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#10
(09-09-2016, 12:48 PM)natyprueba Wrote: Hi Lanco.

You live in FL and I know by my own experience that over there almost every day of the year is really wet because the lakes, swamps, the sea proximity, etc.
Maybe you really don't need the humidifier at all in FL.
My advice is that you give it a try with the lower settings and watch the results.
In modern machines the humidification system doesn't mess with the way that you breath.

I live in N. Florida and have lived in Florida most of my life. It is humid here, but that humidity is at odds with our air conditioning. Assuming you sleep with your windows open I would agree with you, but otherwise, assuming you use air conditioning - it gets more complicated.

I am learning cello, and just purchased a fairly good one. As part of my care and feeding of the cello (which stays in my bedroom where my practice studio takes up about 1/2 the area) I monitor the humidity closely and try to maintain it in a range of 45% to 55%. (Large swings of humidity can crack a cello and result in very expensive repairs) Staying at 50% would be optimum. So, I have a humidifier in the room which fights with the air conditioner - and we go though about 1 gallon of distilled water a day in response to the humidified trying to keep the humidity in that range, and the AC drying the air and dripping all that expensive water outside.

I still use the humidifier on my CPAP machine, and it uses about 1/2 of the tank (1 cup?) over night with it set at 4 - what ever that means.

Given all that moisture, I still get VERY dry mouth if I spring a leak. Seriously cracking the mucus membranes inside my cheeks dry. The forced air blowing though your mouth unchecked will suck a lot of water out of you in very little time - say 15 to 30 minutes.

Oh, and I do occasionally use lavender in the room humidifier as a "relaxation" method and it is pretty strong inside the mask!
I am not a Medical professional and I don't play one on the internet.
Started CPAP Therapy April 5, 2016
I'd Rather Be Sleeping
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